Ami's SOA Today's Date in Lincoln's Life

LoyaltyOfDogs

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I believe the last time he would see his faithful dog. I don't think he ever visited Springfield for the rest of his life. And I doubt Fido made it to D.C.
I think you're right, @frontrank2. I recall reading that Lincoln never did visit Springfield, and Fido continued to live with the Rolls. Here's a little summary I wrote about Lincoln and Fido:

Fido and Lincoln Legend.jpg


Lincoln's Springfield barber, William de Fleurville, wrote the President a letter that mentioned Fido, asking Lincoln to let Willie and Tad know that their dog was doing well. After Lincoln was assassinated, as Springfield prepared for his funeral and burial, a member of the Roll family took Fido to the Lincoln home to greet the crowds of people who had gathered there. Sadly, Fido met his own fate a short time later, when he was stabbed by a local man. There is some speculation that the stabbing might have been accidental, according to a newspaper article referenced in a popular CivilWarTalk thread about Fido.
 
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frontrank2

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I think you're right, @frontrank2. I recall reading that Lincoln never did visit Springfield, and Fido continued to live with the Rolls. Here's a little summary I wrote about Lincoln and Fido:

View attachment 390654

Lincoln's Springfield barber, William de Fleurville, wrote the President a letter that mentioned Fido, asking Lincoln to let Willie and Tad know that their dog was doing well. After Lincoln was assassinated, as Springfield prepared for his funeral and burial, a member of the Roll family took Fido to the Lincoln home to greet the crowds of people who had gathered there. Sadly, Fido met his own fate a short time later, when he was stabbed by a local man. There is some speculation that the stabbing might have been accidental, according to a newspaper article referenced in a popular CivilWarTalk thread about Fido.
Photo of Fido

Fido_the_dog.jpg
 

frontrank2

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Tuesday February 12, 1861

Indianapolis, IN.

After breakfasting at governor's mansion, Lincoln accompanies Gov. Morton (Ind.) to Capitol, where he exchanges greetings with members of legislature.
Shortly after 10 A.M. he appears for third time on balcony of Bates House and, in response to crowd which had gathered, makes practically same remarks as on previous evening.
Welcomes Mrs. Lincoln and sons to presidential party and takes affectionate leave of old Illinois friends, Jesse K. Dubois and Ebenezer Peck.
Boards train at 11 A.M., escorted by governor and committee from legislature.
Meets welcoming committee from Ohio and Kentucky on train.
Speaks from rear platform at Indiana towns of Morris, Shelbyville, Greensburg, and Lawrenceburg, during four-hour ride to Cincinnati.
Arrives in Cincinnati shortly after 3 P.M., receives immense ovation, and is welcomed by Mayor Richard M. Bishop.
Rides in carriage with mayor, escorted by Washington Dragoon regiment, for two hours and arrives at Burnet House, where he addresses huge crowd: "I hope that, although we have some threatening National difficulties now—I hope that while these free institutions shall continue to be in the enjoyment of millions of free people of the United States, we will see repeated every four years what we now witness."
Attends public reception in hotel dining room during evening. Goes to balcony at 8 P.M. and speaks to several thousand members of German Industrial Association: "I deem it my duty—a duty which I owe my constituents—to you, gentlemen, that I should wait until the last moment, for a development of the present national difficulties, before I express myself decidedly what course I shall pursue. . . . Mr. Chairman, I hold that while man exists, it is his duty to improve not only his own condition, but to assist in ameliorating mankind; and therefore, without entering upon the details of the question, I will simply say that I am for those means which will give the greatest good to the greatest number."
 

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Wednesday February 13, 1861

Cincinnati, Oh.

Lincoln and party, under escort of committee from Ohio Legislature, leave Burnet House at 8:30 A.M. in eight carriages for depot of Little Miami Railroad and leave city at 9 A.M. Lincoln makes short speeches at Ohio towns of Milford, Loveland, Miamiville, Morrow, Corwin, Xenia, and London.
Arrives in Columbus at 2 P.M. Receives national salute; gets enthusiastic welcome from crowd of 60,000.
In Columbus, Lincoln speaks to Ohio's General Assembly. He acknowledges that he has revealed little about "the policy of the new administration." Lincoln explains, "In the varying and repeatedly shifting scenes of the present, and without a precedent which could enable me to judge by the past, it has seemed fitting that before speaking upon the difficulties of the country, I should have gained a view of the whole field . . . being at liberty to modify and change the course of policy, as future events may make a change necessary."
Speaks to public from steps of Capitol immediately following visit to legislature: "The manifestations of good-will towards the government, and affection for the Union which you may exhibit are of immense value to you and your posterity forever."
At 4:30 P.M. receives telegram from Washington, informing him that he is duly elected President of the United States. Attends levee in full evening dress for members of legislature, army and militia officers, Lincoln party, and special guests at residence of Gov. William Dennison (Ohio).
Returns to Capitol after supper and again receives public. Later accompanies Governor to Deshler Hall, where guards are giving military ball in his honor. Leads grand promenade with captain's wife.
Lincoln family spends night as guests at governor's home.
 

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Thursday February 14, 1861

Columbus, Oh.

Lincoln and family leave governor's mansion at 7 A.M. under escort for depot. Train departs shortly before 8 A.M. with throngs of people standing under umbrellas waving farewells.
Lincoln travels most of way to Pittsburgh in rain, but makes number of stops for speeches where crowds are waiting. Responds to welcome at Ohio towns of Newark, Frazeysburg, Dresden, Coshocton, Newcomerstown, Uhrichsville, Cadiz Junction, Steubenville, Wellsville, and at Pennsylvania towns of Rochester, Allegheny City, and Pittsburgh.
At Cadiz Junction Lincoln dines at Parks House; later remarks to crowd from platform of car that he is "too full for utterance."
Receives welcome from Judge Lloyd and approximately 10,000 people gathered around carpeted stage near railroad tracks in Steubenville. Replies: "We everywhere express devotion to the Constitution. I believe there is no difference in this respect, whether on this or on the other side of this majestic stream. . . . The question is, as to what the Constitution means— . . . To decide that, who shall be the judge? Can you think of any other, than the voice of the people?"
Leaves Steubenville at 2:30 P.M. and shortly arrives at Wellsville where he makes brief remarks from platform of rear car. Escort committees from Allegheny City and Cleveland are on board. At Rochester Lincoln answers question, "What will you do with the secesssionists then?" by saying, "My friend, that is a matter which I have under very grave consideration."
Arrives at Allegheny City at 8 P.M., having been delayed two hours by broken-down freight train near Freedom, Ohio. Acknowledges welcome of mayor in rain and enters carriage for Monongahela House in Pittsburgh across river. ["We finally got Mr. Lincoln into a carriage; but . . . it looked for a while as if we would never get the carriage out of the crowd that was pushing and yelling all around us."
Large crowds in rain and mud block streets to hotel and pack lobby. Standing on chair in lobby of Monongahela House Lincoln reflects: "I could not help thinking, my friends, as I traveled in the rain through your crowded streets, on my way here, that if all that people were in favor of the Union, it can certainly be in no great danger—it will be preserved. . . . Well, my friends, as it is not much I have to say, and as there may be some uncertainty of another opportunity, I will utter it now, if you will permit me to procure a few notes." Returns and announces he has been persuaded to finish speech in morning.
 

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Friday February 15, 1861

Pittsburg, Pa.

At 8:30 A.M. Lincoln appears on balcony of Monongahela House, and delivers longest address of journey. Multitude of 5,000 stands in rain in front of hotel. Mayor George Wilson introduces Lincoln, who repeats remarks made in Columbus, Ohio then comments on tariff: "So long as direct taxation for the support of government is not resorted to, a tariff is necessary. . . . I have long thought that if there be any article of necessity which can be produced at home with as little or nearly the same labor as abroad, it would be better to protect that article. Labor is the true standard of value. . . . According to my political education, I am inclined to believe that the people in the various sections of the country should have their own views carried out through their representatives in Congress, . . . so that . . . adequate protection can be extended to the coal and iron of Pennsylvania, the corn of Illinois, and the 'reapers of Chicago.' " Lincoln visits Leonard Swett, elector-at-large from Illinois, who has been detained at hotel several weeks by sickness.
Leaves immediately for depot through streets lined with people. Kisses little boy and three lasses while waiting in crowd at depot, part of time in rain.
Train departs 10 A.M. and retraces journey through Rochester, Pa., to Wellsville, Ohio. Lincoln tells assemblage at Wellsville that he will not speak, because he did so day before. At Salineville and Bayard, Ohio, responds to cheering crowds by saluting and bowing.
At Alliance, Ohio, he offers remarks that now have become routine: "I appear before you merely to greet you and say farewell. . . . If I should make a speech at every town, I would not get to Washington until some time after the inauguration."
Accepts hospitality of John N. McCullough, president of railroad, and has dinner at Sourbeck's Hotel. Company of Canton Zouaves stands guard, band plays national airs, and gun salute shatters window during meal, sprinkling glass on Mrs. Lincoln. From temporary stand in front of depot, Lincoln thanks citizens for rousing reception and excuses himself from speaking.
At Hudson, Ohio, crowd engulfs train. Lincoln steps out on train platform and remarks: "You see by my voice that I am quite hoarse. You will not, therefore, expect a speech from me."
At Ravenna, Ohio, says: "There are doubtless those here who did not vote for me, but I believe we make common cause for the Union."
Arrives at Cleveland in snow storm.
Detrains two miles from center of city. "Deafening shout from tens of thousands was re-echoed by roar of artillery." Enters open carriage at approximately 4:30 P.M. Escort of military (Cleveland Grays) and fire companies joins procession to Weddell House. Acting Mayor J. N. Masters and Judge Sherlock J. Andrews welcome him. Lincoln replies: "I think that there is no occasion for any excitement. The crisis, as it is called, is altogether an artificial crisis."
Attends brilliant reception in his honor given in evening. Separate levee held for Mrs. Lincoln. At 10 P.M. Lincoln and suite are guests at supper in Weddell House, where they have lodgings.
 

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Saturday February 16, 1861

Cleveland Oh.

Militia company of Cleveland Grays escorts Lincoln from hotel to 9 A.M. train. Leland's Brass Band entertains at depot.
Train stops at Ohio towns of Willoughby, Painesville, Geneva, Madison, Ashtabula, Conneaut, at Pennsylvania towns of Girard, Erie, Northeast, and at New York towns of Westfield, Dunkirk, and Silver Creek, arriving Buffalo 4:30 P.M. On board are committees from Ohio Legislature, Cleveland, Erie, Chautauqua County, N.Y., and Buffalo.
At Willoughby Lincoln has time to say good morning and goodbye. At Painesville he speaks from special platform to estimated 3,000 persons in response to introduction by Mayor Wilcox.
Crowd calls for Mrs. Lincoln at Ashtabula, and President-elect remarks that "he should hardly hope to induce her to appear, as he had always found it very difficult to make her do what she did not want to." At Conneaut Lincoln thanks "people for the kindly demonstration."
Horace Greeley boards train at Girard and rides to Erie. Lincoln greets crowd and receives baskets of fruit.
At 12:22 P.M. presidential party detrains at Erie, and committee escorts it to dining room of railroad company, where Lincoln makes speech. At Northeast he delivers brief remarks from rear platform.
En route to Washington, D. C., Lincoln's train stops in Westfield, New York, where a "large crowd" greets him. Lincoln remarks that Westfield is the home of twelve-year-old Grace Bedell, who "advised me to let my whiskers grow." Lincoln adds, "[A]cting partly upon her suggestion, I have done so; and now, if she is here, I would like to see her." Before he departs, Lincoln locates the "beautiful girl, with black eyes" and gives her "several hearty kisses . . . amid the yells of delight from the excited crowd."
Crowd of 15,000 citizens of Chautauqua County greets Lincoln at Dunkirk. From trackside platform he says: "Standing as I do, with my hand upon this staff, and under the folds of the American flag, I Ask You to Stand by Me so Long as I Stand by It."
Former President Millard Fillmore and crowd of 10,000 welcome presidential party to Buffalo at 4:30 P.M. Guard of soldiers and police being unable to prevent disorderly jam, guests are jostled and separated; Maj. David Hunter's arm is dislocated, and members of presidential partywalk to hotel. Lincoln rides in procession with Acting Mayor A. S. Benies, Committee Chairman A. M. Clapp, and Ward Hill Lamon, former law partner of Lincoln and bodyguard during trip to Washington. Arriving at American House, speaks from balcony in reply to welcome by acting mayor: "It is most proper I should wait, see the developments, and get all the light I can, so that when I do speak authoritatively I may be as near right as possible. . . . allow me to say that you, as a portion of the great American people, need only to maintain your composure." Meets 34 members of Buffalo committee and governor's staff, who will accompany him to Albany. Holds public reception at 7:30 P.M. Later receives another welcoming committee of 20 Germans headed by ex-Alderman Jacob Beyer. Listens to serenades by two singing groups.
 

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Tuesday February 17, 1863

Washington D.C.

President transmits to Senate treaty with Potawatomi Nation in Kansas.
Consults with General Benjamin F. Butler regarding Butler's next command.
At 7 P.M. receives W. H. Tyler, chairman, and members of New York committee bearing resolutions concerning colonization of Florida with "armed free labor colonies."
Lincoln writes to Major General William S. Rosecrans and reveals a strategy to offset Confederate "raids of rapidly moving small bodies of troops [that are] . . . harrassing, and discouraging loyal residents, supplying themselves with provisions, clothing, horses . . . surprising and capturing small detachments of our forces, and breaking our communications." Lincoln concludes, "I think we should organize proper forces, and make counter-raids." He asks, "What think you of trying to get up such a corps in your army?"
 

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Monday February 18, 1861

Buffalo, NY

Several hundred persons and military escort witness Lincoln's departure by train at 5:45 A.M. Horace Greeley again on board. Stops made at New York towns of Batavia, Rochester, Clyde, Syracuse, Utica, Little Falls, Fonda, Amsterdam, and Schenectady.
Mr. Bloomer, of Buffalo, "provides the party with dinner, a car being especially fitted up for that purpose." Lincoln is traveling in car used few months previously by Prince of Wales.
At Syracuse Lincoln disappoints crowd of 10,000 by speaking from train instead of from platform in front of Globe Hotel.
Acknowledges remarks of welcome by mayor of Utica. At Schenectady does not mount special platform in replying to introduction by Judge Platt Potter of Supreme Court.
Receives enthusiastic welcome upon arrival in Albany at 2:30 P.M. Exchanges short speeches on train platform with Mayor George H. Thatcher before entering open carriage for ride to state Capitol, where he receives, and replies to, welcome by governor and staff. Immediately afterwards addresses joint meeting of legislature: "It is true that while I hold myself without mock modesty, the humblest of all individuals that have ever been elevated to the Presidency, I have a more difficult task to perform than any one of them. . . . I still have confidence that the Almighty, the Maker of the Universe will . . . bring us through this as He has through all the other difficulties of our country."
Thurlow Weed interviews Lincoln at Delavan House where presidential party is staying. Rail Splitters, political club, present bouquet. Committee to escort him to New York calls. Lincoln receives committee from Troy, N.Y., and accepts invitation for next day to "spend just as much time with you as the train permits."
Lincoln and Morgan families have evening meal at governor's mansion. Lincoln returns to Delavan House for levee at 9 P.M. and greets individually about 1,000 persons; also visits levee held for ladies.
 

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Wednesday February 19, 1862

Washington D.C.

President recommends by proclamation that people celebrate Washington's Birthday publicly by listening to reading of his "Farewell Address."
President Lincoln writes to Superintendent in the Office of U.S. Army Nurses Dorothea Dix. Earlier in the day, Dix wrote to Lincoln, presumably to offer her assistance in caring for the Lincolns' eleven-year-old son, Willie, who is seriously ill. Lincoln writes, "The President's & Mrs L's thanks to Miss Dix for her kind inquiry by note of this morning. They do not, just now, need the nurse, but will preserve Miss Dix note, and call on her if occasion hereafter shall require."
Willie continues critically ill though somewhat easier than yesterday.
President approves act prohibiting "coolie trade" by American citizens in American vessels.
 

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Thursday February 20, 1862

Washington D.C.

Willie Lincoln dies at 5 P.M. President sends carriage for Senator and Mrs. Orville H. Browning (Ill.). They spend night at White House.
President stops in secretary's office and says: "Well, Nicolay, my boy is gone—he is actually gone," and bursting into tears turns and goes into his own office.
Mrs. Lincoln is inconsolable.

willie2.jpg
 

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Friday February 21, 1862

Washington D.C.

Cabinet meets at 11 A.M. in State Dept.; President does not attend.
Secretary of State William H. Seward confers with President about England's disapproval of U.S. proposals in Mason-Slidell case.
Lincoln confers with Gen. Butler about New Orleans expedition.
Congress meets and adjourns after reading "Journal" because of death in President's family. Cabinet requests Congress to cancel illumination of public buildings on Washington's birthday out of respect for President's family.
Cabinet members and wives call on President and Mrs. Lincoln.
 

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Saturday February 22, 1862

Washington D.C.

President does not attend Washington's Birthday celebration at Capitol.
Tad Lincoln is sick.
At the request of the Cabinet and by Joint Resolution of Congress, public buildings are not illuminated this night from condolence for death of President's son.
Charles Edwards Lester calls in evening with Dr. Charles D. Brown, who embalmed Willie's body by new process. Lincoln looks in Green Room where body lies in state.
 

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Saturday February 23, 1861

Baltimore, Md.

Philadelphia-to-Washington train, with Lincoln, W. H. Lamon, and detective Allan Pinkerton on board, switches to Baltimore & Ohio tracks about 4 A.M. at Baltimore and arrives Washington 6 A.M.
Cong. Washburne (Ill.) surprises Lincoln by meeting train with carriage and driving him to Willard's Hotel, 14th St. and Pennsylvania Ave. NW.
Lincoln breakfasts with Sen. Seward (N.Y.), after which they call upon President Buchanan at White House and meet members of cabinet. Calls on Gen. Scott, who is not home. Returns to Willard's.
Telegraphs Mrs. Lincoln in Harrisburg, Pa., of safe arrival Washington 6 A.M.
Visitors include Montgomery Blair [soon to be postmaster general] and father, Francis P. Blair, Sr., Washington newspaperman and political figure.
 

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Monday February 24, 1862

Washington D.C.

Rev. Dr. Phineas D. Gurley conducts simple funeral service for Willie Lincoln at 2 P.M. in East Room while body remains in adjoining Green Parlor. Large crowd includes cabinet officers, foreign ministers, members of Congress, and citizens in general.
Robert Lincoln, and Senators Orville H. Browning (Ill.) and Lyman Trumbull (Ill.) accompany President to Oak Hill Cemetery, R and Washington Streets, Georgetown, where body of Willie is placed in William T. Carroll's vault.
Government departments closed because of funeral service for Willie Lincoln.
U.S. Supreme Court also adjourns for the day, out of respect for the President's grief.
Tad Lincoln is "decidedly better."
 

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Tuesday February 25, 1862

Washington D.C.

Cabinet meets and discusses paroling prisoners of war.
President approves Treasury Note (Legal Tender) Bill that results in issuance of "Greenbacks."
Gen. Butler calls on Lincoln before leaving Washington for Ship Island, Miss., and New Orleans. President tells him to get into New Orleans and thus break back of rebellion.
Consults with Committee on Conduct of War in evening and hears its recommendations that Army of Potomac be divided into corps.
Transmits to Congress Russian documentation relative to "Trent" affair.
 

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