Ami's SOA Today's Date in Lincoln's Life

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Tuesday January 24, 1865

Washington D.C.

Lincoln writes to Vice President-elect Andrew Johnson regarding the necessity of Johnson's presence in Washington, D. C. for the March 4 inaugural. Johnson, who is the Military Governor of Tennessee, wishes to remain in Tennessee until April 3, when the state will formally re-enter the Union. Lincoln replies that he has consulted with " several members of the Cabinet," and "it is our unanamous conclusion that it is unsafe for you to not be here on the fourth of March. Be sure to reach here by that time."
Replies to presentation speech of Rev. William Suddards at head of delegation of ladies from Philadelphia Sanitary Fair. Receives vase of skeleton leaves from Gettysburg battlefield.
Summons Asst. Sec. Fox to White House for action regarding Confederate rams in James River. Vice Adm. Farragut sent down to inspect to satisfy President.
 

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Sunday January 25, 1863

Washington D.C.

President in 10 A.M. conference with Gens. Burnside and Halleck announces decision to relieve Burnside and put Gen. Hooker in command.
Boston antislavery group accompanied by Sen. Wilson (Mass.) calls upon President and complains that Emancipation Proclamation has failed to accomplish its purpose.
 

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Monday January 26, 1863

Washington D.C.

President Lincoln writes to Major General Joseph Hooker, the new "head of the Army of the Potomac." Lincoln admires Hooker's bravery, "confidence," and "ambition, which within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm." But, Lincoln chides the General with respect to Hooker's predecessor General Ambrose Burnside: "[Y]ou . . . thwarted him as much as you could [and in so doing] . . . you did a great wrong to the country, and to a most meritorious and honorable brother officer. . . . Neither you, nor Napoleon, if he were alive again, could get any good out of an army, while such a spirit prevails . . . Beware of rashness, but with energy, and sleepless vigilance, go forward, and give us victories."
Transmits to Senate documents respecting capture of British vessels having on board contraband of war.
Tells O. H. Browning story of Gen. Burnside's resignation and Hooker's appointment.
Simon Cameron interviews President to protest sending Gen. Butler to New Orleans because Butler is likely candidate for next President and must be in Washington for political reasons.
 

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Saturday January 27, 1838

Springfield, IL.

State Representative Lincoln addresses the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois, on the topic of "the perpetuation of our political institutions." Lincoln warns against the "mobocratic spirit, which . . . is now abroad in the land." He states, "There is no grievance that is a fit object of redress by mob law." Lincoln acknowledges that "[p]assion" played a role in America's fight for independence. But, Lincoln argues, "Reason, cold, calculating, unimpassioned reason" will best serve "for our future support and defence."
 

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Monday, January 28, 1861

Springfield, IL.

"The first draft of the Inaugural Message is now being made by the President-elect, . . . It will not be finished until after consultation with the Republican leaders in Washington. . . . No further invitations will be issued to prominent politicians to visit the President-elect, and none are desired here. The Cabinet will be completed in Washington."
Lincoln invites his cousin, John Hanks, to "go along" on visit to Coles County, Ill., January 30, 1861.
Committee representing citizens of Indianapolis calls upon Lincoln to present transcript of resolutions inviting him to visit city en route to Washington. The same day Lincoln writes committee accepting invitation and setting February 12, 1861 as date.
Lincoln withdraws $40.90 from Springfield Marine Bank.
 

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Wednesday January 29, 1862

Washington D.C.

Lincoln meets with Ellen Sherman, the wife of General William T. Sherman, and with her father Thomas Ewing, a former United States Senator from Ohio. Some in the press speculate that General Sherman is insane. Ellen Sherman acknowledges to Lincoln that her husband is "in low spirits and in poor health," but she writes to General Sherman that she asked the President "if he thought you insane when in command at Fort Corcoran. I told him you were no more so now. That I had known you since you were ten years old and you were the Same now that you had always been." Ellen Sherman believes that some of her husband's superiors, including Adjutant General Lorenzo Thomas and former Secretary of War Simon Cameron, have not been supportive of Sherman. She writes him, "I told him you had enemies among your fellow Generals & that the newspaper correspondants were mere tools. . . . I told him that Adj. Genl. Thomas and Mr Cameron were inimical to you & that they had placed you in a false light to him." Ellen Sherman states that she wanted to meet with Lincoln "to say a word against those who had conspired against you &c & in vindication of your name." She notes that Lincoln "seemed very anxious that we should believe that he felt kindly towards you." She adds, "The President is very friendly to you."
 

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Tuesday January 30, 1849

Washington D.C.

Congressman Lincoln votes against motion to table resolution for printing 10,000 extra copies of report of Committee on Naval Affairs on railroad across Panama. Vote is tie, speaker votes nay, defeating motion. When resolution comes to vote, Lincoln votes aye. It passes 96-86.
 

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Tuesday January 31, 1865

Washington D.C.

President Lincoln writes to Secretary of State William H. Seward and instructs him to "proceed to Fortress-Monroe, Virginia," to "informally confer" with a Confederate peace commission, which includes Alexander H. Stephens, John A. Campbell, and Robert M. T. Hunter. Lincoln directs Seward to inform the participants of the President's stance on "national authority...Slavery...[and a] cessation of hostilities." Lincoln pledges that he will ponder any of the commission's proposals as long as they are "not inconsistent with" the positions that he has outlined.
O. H. Browning and J. W. Singleton arrive at White House as President leaves for theater. They arrange meeting for following day.
At 11 P.M. Lincoln locates document relative to Confederate commissioners at Fortress Monroe and sends it to Sec. Seward.
Deposits November salary warrant for $1,981.67 in Riggs Bank.
 

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Monday February 1, 1864

Washington D.C.

President directs Sec. Stanton to have transport sent to Negro colony established on Ile à Vache and to bring back all who wish to return.
Orders that draft for 500,000 men, to serve for three years or during war, be made on March 10, 1864 next.
Interviews Capt. Ulric Dahlgren, who has waited from 11 A.M. until 4 P.M. They discuss personal and military matters while Lincoln is being shaved.
 

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Thursday February 2, 1865

Washington D.C.

President telegraphs Gen. Grant at 9 A.M.: "Say to the gentlemen [Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell] I will meet them personally at Fortress-Monroe, as soon as I can get there."
At 11 A.M., leaves by special train for Annapolis, Md., where he boards steamer "Thomas Collyer," and late in evening arrives at Fortress Monroe. Immediately goes on board steamer "River Queen," where Sec. Seward is waiting.
"The President and Mr. Seward have gone to Hampton Roads to have an interview with the Rebel commissioners,—Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell."
 

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Monday February 3, 1862

Washington D.C.

President Lincoln replies to the King of Siam for gifts including "a sword" and "two elephant tusks." Lincoln accepts the items for the "American People," and not for his "personal" use. Lincoln declines the King's offer of some elephants, explaining, "Our political jurisdiction...does not reach a latitude so low as to favor the multiplication of the elephant, and steam on land, as well as on water, has been our best and most efficient agent of transportation in internal commerce."
Lincoln writes to Major General George B. McClellan regarding their "distinct, and different plans for a movement of the Army of the Potomac." Lincoln queries, "Does not your plan involve a greatly larger expenditure of time, and money than mine? . . . Wherein is a victory morecertain by your plan than mine? . . . In case of disaster, would not a safe retreat be more difficult by your plan than by mine?" Lincoln pledges, "If you will give me satisfactory answers . . . I shall gladly yield my plan to yours."
 

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Thursday February 4, 1864

Washington D.C.


President sends to Edward Everett "the manuscript of my remarks at Gettysburg" for delivery to Ladies Committee of New York Metropolitan Sanitary Fair.
Transmits to Senate correspondence between Union and Confederate authorities on exchange of prisoners.
Interviews Dr. Zacharie and Goodman L. Mordecai of South Carolina, who thanks President for releasing him from Washington prison where he had been confined as Confederate agent.
President hosts State dinner for "members of the foreign legations and other distinguished guests."
 

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Sunday February 5, 1865

Washington D.C.

President reads to cabinet meeting at 7 P.M. proposal for joint resolution of Congress whereby payment of $400 million would be distributed among 16 states pro rata on their slave population in return for cessation of all resistance to national authority by April 1, 1865. Cabinet unanimously disapproves.
 

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Wednesday February 6, 1861

Springfield IL.


Lincoln accepts invitation of New Jersey Legislature to visit state capital on journey to Washington. Accepts invitation of citizens of Albany, N.Y., to visit their city en route to inauguration. Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln (assisted by four of her sisters) hold farewell reception at home.
Prior to their departure for Washington, D. C., Lincoln and his wife Mary host a farewell "reception" at their home. A newspaper reports, "The levee lasted from seven to twelve o'clock in the evening, and the house thronged by thousands up to a late hour. Mr. Lincoln received the guests as they entered and were made known. They then passed on, and were introduced to Mrs. Lincoln, who stood near the center of the parlors, and who . . . acquitted herself most gracefully and admirably." Another reporter writes, "Behind [Lincoln] on the sofa were his two little boys, about eight and four years of age respectively, the youngest of whom was as noisy as a cub wolf. After a considerable time, the noise of the little urchin attracted the father's attention. Thereupon, turning about, and stooping down . . . he had some of the pleasantest words for the little fellow, that can be imagined. Thereafter there was no noise while I remained. Mrs. Lincoln, who is a squatty, pleasant little woman, receives her visitors with an easy gracefulness that makes all feel comfortable."
"Reception announced for 7:00 to 12:00. Thousands came and it lasted longer." Henry B. Rankin, Intimate Character Sketches of Abraham Lincoln (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1924),
 

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Friday February 7, 1862

Washington D.C.

Lincoln interviews delegation from Congress interested in settling argument between Gen. Hunter and Gen. Lane.
Spends most of time with son Willie who is critically ill.
Borrows "Emerson's Representative Men" from Library of Congress.
Transmits to Senate "correspondence relating to the presentation of American citizens to the court of France."
 

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Sunday February 9, 1862

Washington D.C.

Prayer for President omitted from church service results in arrest of Alexandria, Va., clergyman. (N.Y. Tribune, 10 February 1862.)
During Sunday afternoon in War Dept. Sec. Stanton accuses Thomas T. Eckert, superintendent of military telegraphs, of neglecting his duties. Lincoln is present and defends Eckert.
 

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Wednesday February 10, 1864

Washington D.C.

President devotes morning to courtmartial cases. Receives public at 1 P.M.
Delegation of 18 gentlemen from convention at Allegheny City, Pa., calls on President to discuss amending Constitution in favor of freedom.
In the evening, a fire destroys President Lincoln's "private stables." A newspaper reports, "[Mr.] Cooper, the President's private coachman, left the stable to get his supper about 8 o'clock, and he was first notified of the fire by the President himself, who discovered the smoke . . . The building . . . contained . . . six horses, all of which were burned to death . . . One of these ponies was all the more highly prized, in consequence of having once been the property of Willie, the deceased son of Mr. and Mrs. President Lincoln."
President's two horses, John Nicolay's two horses, and Tad's two ponies are lost.
Hours later, "Lincoln and others were standing in the East Room looking at the still burning stables. Lincoln was weeping. Tad explained it was because Willie's pony was there."

The White House stable destroyed by fire on February 10, 1864
whitehousestable.jpg
 

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Monday February 11, 1861

Springfield, IL.

At approximately 7:30 A.M. President-elect leaves Chenery House without Mrs. Lincoln for Great Western Railroad depot, to start trip to Washington.
Withdraws $400 from Springfield Marine Bank; deposits $82.25, payment by S. H. Melvin for certain household furniture.
Shakes hands with friends as they file by. At 8 A.M. boards train and in response to demands of crowd (estimated at 1,000) speaks from rear platform: "My friends—No one, not in my situation, can appreciate my feeling of sadness at this parting. To this place, and the kindness of these people, I owe everything. . . . I now leave, . . . with a task before me greater than that which rested upon Washington. . . . Trusting in Him, who can go with me, and remain with you . . . I bid you an affectionate farewell." Later, with aid of John G. Nicolay, he writes out farewell remarks at request of reporter.
Lincoln acknowledges greetings of people at number of stops during morning. At Decatur, Ill. moves rapidly through crowd at depot, shaking hands right and left.
Makes brief remarks at Tolono and Danville, Ill.
At 12:30 P.M. train arrives at Indiana State Line where he is welcomed by committee of state legislature headed by Capt. Frederick Steele. Here Great Western joins Toledo and Wabash, and large numbers of Indiana politicians board train. At Lafayette, Ind., Lincoln says: "While some of us may differ in political opinions, still we are all united in one feeling for the Union. We all believe in the maintainance of the Union, of every star and every stripe of the glorious flag, and permit me to express the sentiment that upon the union of the States, there shall be between us no difference."
Greets people at Thorntown and Lebanon, Ind. Every station along route has its crowd.
Arives in Indianapolis at 5 P.M. At West Washington St. is officially welcomed by Gov. Oliver P. Morton (Ind.) and receives 34-gun salute.
Lincoln replies: "To the salvation of this Union there needs but one single thing—the hearts of a people like yours. . . . my reliance will be placed upon you and the people of the United States— . . . It is your business to rise up and preserve the Union and liberty, for yourselves, and not for me."
Leaves train for carriage, remains standing, and joins procession of 20,000, composed of both houses of legislature, public officers, municipal authorities, military, and firemen, to Bates House, where he stays overnight. From balcony he says: "The words 'coercion' and 'invasion' are in great use about these days. . . . Would the marching of an army into South Carolina, for instance, without the consent of her people, and in hostility against them, be coercion or invasion? . . . But if the Government, for instance, but simply insists upon holding its own forts, or retaking those forts which belong to it, or the enforcement of the laws of the United States . . . or even the withdrawal of the mails from those portions of the country where the mails themselves are habitually violated; would any or all of these things be coercion? . . . What is the particular sacredness of a State? . . . I am speaking of that assumed right of a State, as a primary principle, that the Constitution should rule all that is less than itself, and ruin all that is bigger than itself. But, I ask, wherein does consist that right? . . . I am deciding nothing, but simply giving something for you to reflect upon."
At 7 P.M. begins greeting no fewer than 3,000 persons during impromptu reception in main parlor.
Becomes excited over temporary loss of satchel containing copies of Inaugural Address.
 

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Monday February 11, 1861

Springfield, IL.

At approximately 7:30 A.M. President-elect leaves Chenery House without Mrs. Lincoln for Great Western Railroad depot, to start trip to Washington...
I imagine that a scene something like this might have taken place shortly before, as Lincoln left his family's home. Fido would not be accompanying the Lincolns to Washington but would be left in the care of a family friend, John Roll, whose sons were friends of Willie and Tad.

Lincoln & Fido Shadowbox Illustration.jpg
 

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I imagine that a scene something like this might have taken place shortly before, as Lincoln left his family's home. Fido would not be accompanying the Lincolns to Washington but would be left in the care of a family friend, John Roll, whose sons were friends of Willie and Tad.

View attachment 390651
I believe the last time he would see his faithful dog. I don't think he ever visited Springfield for the rest of his life. And I doubt Fido made it to D.C.
 

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