Ami's SOA Today's Date in Lincoln's Life

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I've been contemplating doing this thread for a while, and have finally decided to " Git er done."

Lincoln expresses uneasiness over progress of cavalry under General Stoneman: "I do not know that any better can be done, but I greatly fear it is another failure already." Letter to Gen. Hooker - April 15, 1863.
 
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Saturday - April 15, 1865

Surgeons maintain constant observation of President through night. About 2 A.M. Vice President pays call. Dawn finds Mrs. Lincoln and Robert still waiting in Petersen's house.
Dr. Charles S. Taft at bedside records his observations: President stops breathing "at 7:21 and 55 seconds in the morning of April 15th, and 7:22 and 10 seconds his pulse ceased to beat."
Silence follows and is broken by voice of Sec. Stanton: "Now he belongs to the ages."

13236.jpeg
 

Pete Longstreet

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I've been contemplating doing this thread for a while, and have finally decided to " Git er done."

Lincoln expresses uneasiness over progress of cavalry under General Stoneman: "I do not know that any better can be done, but I greatly fear it is another failure already." Letter to Gen. Hooker - April 15, 1863.

This shows the lack of confidence in Stoneman, which was proven shortly thereafter: Chancellorsville. Stoneman took a lot of "blame" regarding that defeat and was ultimately relieved of command by Hooker.
 

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Saturday - April 16, 1859

Springfield, IL.

In response to letter from T. J. Pickett, Rock Island editor, asking permission to propose his name as presidential candidate, Lincoln writes: "I must, in candor, say I do not think myself fit for the Presidency. I certainly am flattered, and gratified, that some partial friends think of me in that connection; but I really think it best for our cause that no concerted effort, such as you suggest, should be made."
 

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Wednesday - April 17, 1861

Lincoln confers with Gen. Scott on matters pertaining to Harper's Ferry, Va., Gosport Navy Yard, Va., and defense of Washington.

Company of Marylanders calls upon President and urges reinforcement of Fort McHenry, Md.
 

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Friday - April 19,1861

Lincoln orders "a blockade of the ports" in the seceded states of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. The states' status affects "that provision of the Constitution which requires duties to be uniform throughout the United States." Additionally, the blockade will protect "the lives, vessels, and property of good citizens of the country lawfully engaged in commerce on the high seas, and in waters of the United States."
Lincoln drives out to inspect forts around Washington. Attempts to aid Gosport Navy Yard, Va., but fails.
President receives telegram from Gov. Hicks (Md.) and Brown that 6th Massachusetts Infantry passing through Baltimore is attacked by mob. Approximately four soldiers and nine citizens killed.

The_Sixth_Massachusetts_Regiment_passing_through_Baltimore_in_1861_(14598387859).jpg
 

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Monday - April 20, 1863


President promises Mrs. James E. Dunawin that application for pardon of husband will have attention of attorney general.
Issues proclamation admitting West Virginia into Union.
President Lincoln gives a "full and unconditional pardon" to John Cunningham, who is serving eight years in prison after a Washington, D. C. court "convicted [him] on two indictments for assault with intent to kill." Lincoln notes that Cunningham "was but eighteen" when he committed the crime, and "his widowed mother is in distress for want of his supporting care." Further, "the inspectors of the penitentiary, the Mayor of Washington, and other citizens have petitioned me in his behalf."
 

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Around 11 a.m., approximately "twenty . . . highly respectable citizens of Baltimore" arrive at the White House to meet with President Lincoln. The group requests that Lincoln "not . . . bring troops through Maryland at this time." Lincoln responds that his goal is to "secure this Capitol to the Government, and protect the lives of its citizens." A newspaper reports, "While it is evident that it is the earnest desire of the President to prevent bloodshed in Maryland, he is doubtless unflinchingly determined that, forcibly, if necessary, the communication of this city with the progressing bodies of troops coming to its relief shall be kept open.
Washington Evening Star
 

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Wednesday - April 24, 1861

Awaiting further troops for defense of Washington, Lincoln talks to wounded men of 6th Massachusetts Regiment at White House and remarks: "I begin to believe that there is no North."
Lincoln responds to a recent letter from former U.S. Senator Reverdy Johnson, of Maryland. Johnson seeks to calm the fears of the citizens of Maryland and Virginia by assuring them that Lincoln does not plan to order an "invasion" of either state. Lincoln replies, "I have no purpose to invade Virginia . . . I have no objection to declare a thousand times that I have no purpose to invade Virginia or any other State, but I do not mean to let them invade us without striking back."
 

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Monday - April 25, 1864

President Lincoln writes to mental health authority Dr. John P. Gray, of Utica, New York, regarding Private Lorenzo C. Stewart, whom a "military court, tried for murder, and sentenced to death, his execution awaiting the order of the President." Lincoln seeks to determine "Stewart's sanity, both at the time of the homocide, and at the time of your examination." Lincoln directs Gray to go to Elmira, New York, where Stewart is imprisoned in order to gather information and then to "report . . . to me . . . your own conclusions."

From eastern portico of Willard's reviews Gen. Burnside's 30,000 troops en route from Annapolis, Md., to reinforce Army of Potomac. In evening Gov. Curtin (Pa.) visits White House. Lincoln discusses F. B. Carpenter's painting with him.
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

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Who was the little crying boy in the picture?
According to the Maine Historical Society's description of the scene, he is Tad Lincoln. The print also portrays Robert Lincoln, standing and holding a handkerchief to his face. But if I remember correctly from the book "Twenty Days," Tad was never present at the Petersen House, and I don't recall any mention that Robert was there. I think he was serving in the army at that time.
 

Polloco

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According to the Maine Historical Society's description of the scene, he is Tad Lincoln. The print also portrays Robert Lincoln, standing and holding a handkerchief to his face. But if I remember correctly from the book "Twenty Days," Tad was never present at the Petersen House, and I don't recall any mention that Robert was there. I think he was serving in the army at that time.
Tad Lincoln is who I figured was the little boy depicted in the pictute,but I never seen it documented that he was ever in that room on the day of Lincoln's death.
 

Ole Miss

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@frontrank2 you posted:
President Lincoln writes to mental health authority Dr. John P. Gray, of Utica, New York, regarding Private Lorenzo C. Stewart, whom a "military court, tried for murder, and sentenced to death, his execution awaiting the order of the President." Lincoln seeks to determine "Stewart's sanity, both at the time of the homocide, and at the time of your examination." Lincoln directs Gray to go to Elmira, New York, where Stewart is imprisoned in order to gather information and then to "report . . . to me . . . your own conclusions."

Thought I would mention what decision was made regarding Private Stewart's case. Stewart with the 14th New York Artillery was arressted for murdering 2 guards accidently with moprphine while escaping jail. His sentence was chaged to 10 years at hard labor.
Regards
David
Lincoln and Medicine by Glenna R. Schroeder-Lein Page 66
 

LoyaltyOfDogs

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Artistic license, no doubt. IIRC, Stanton even ordered Mary from the room.
Yes, I think that's right, @frontrank2 I believe she was hysterical--understandably so--and Stanton ordered her out of the room. She stayed in a smaller room down the hall. The room where Lincoln died was also small, much smaller than it's depicted in artists' drawings like this one. I'd seen photographs and knew that it was small, but I was still surprised at its size when we visited the Petersen House a couple of years ago. The 12 people pictured above would never have fit.
 

frontrank2

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@frontrank2 you posted:
President Lincoln writes to mental health authority Dr. John P. Gray, of Utica, New York, regarding Private Lorenzo C. Stewart, whom a "military court, tried for murder, and sentenced to death, his execution awaiting the order of the President." Lincoln seeks to determine "Stewart's sanity, both at the time of the homocide, and at the time of your examination." Lincoln directs Gray to go to Elmira, New York, where Stewart is imprisoned in order to gather information and then to "report . . . to me . . . your own conclusions."

Thought I would mention what decision was made regarding Private Stewart's case. Stewart with the 14th New York Artillery was arressted for murdering 2 guards accidently with moprphine while escaping jail. His sentence was chaged to 10 years at hard labor.
Regards
David
Lincoln and Medicine by Glenna R. Schroeder-Lein Page 66
Thanks for that info. :thumbsup:
 
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