Today is the 156th Anniversary of Gen. Lee’s Surrender. I propose that it should be declared as a day of National Mourning.

Joined
Mar 15, 2018
Yes - there was slavery in the south, but there was slavery all over the world back in those days. Slavery existed in the northern states of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, and the Yankee state of Rhode Island was a major hub in the international slave trade. It is absolutely wrong in my opinion to crucify the south on the cross of slavery. The sanctimonious northern states, fueled on propaganda, invaded a section of the country that was foreign to them and which they had little or no understanding of. The northern armies went into the southern states with guns blazing, without understanding the ultimate ramifications of their actions.

I think it was Voltaire who said “when in doubt, refrain.”

The war was fought primarily because the benighted Yankee masses were drunk on spurious propaganda that was emanating from the pens of Harriet Beecher Stowe and Hinton Rowan Helper.

The southern states were trying to exit the Union, they only wanted to be left alone, and they were fighting because they were being invaded by a hostile military force.

The 9th of April should be declared as a day of National Mourning.
 

DanSBHawk

1st Lieutenant
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
I would think that a celebration would be more appropriate.

But as Grant said at the time, "The war is over, the Rebels are our countrymen again, and the best sign of rejoicing after the victory will be to abstain from all demonstrations in the field."

It was a great victory, but also the end of a tragic war for a rotten cause, so I understand his point about not rejoicing.
 

J C J Barefoot

Private
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Thirty years before the war Andrew Jackson, a southern President threatened South Carolina with a Federal invasion unless they withdrew the Nullification Acts. South Carolina with drew the Nullification Acts. John Quincey Adams, as a member of the House proposed a resolution of succession of the New England states and the southern House members exploded in a purple rage at JQA screaming that the proposal amount to treason. The "compact" theory of Jefferson Davis had been rejected by Supreme Court Justices---almost all of whom were southern for many years before the war. It was clear by the political and historical record that the south found no right to leave the union until they got an election that they refused to accept. As far as international law of the sea was concerned no state in Europe recognized the Confederate states as independent.
Beyond all that, Fort Sumpter had something to do with the opening of violence.
 

jackt62

Captain
Joined
Jul 28, 2015
Location
New York City
Yes - there was slavery in the south, but there was slavery all over the world back in those days. Slavery existed in the northern states of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, and the Yankee state of Rhode Island was a major hub in the international slave trade. It is absolutely wrong in my opinion to crucify the south on the cross of slavery.

But by 1860, slavery had already been abolished in the northern states as well as in Britain, France and their possessions. In the western hemisphere, with the exception of Brazil, the southern American states were virtually alone in persisting in its continuation. Nevertheless, I and many others would agree that its is wrong to "crucify" only the south on the cross of slavery. Lincoln himself acknowledged in his 2nd inaugural address that the responsibility and penance for slavery was not restricted to just the southern states:

"If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which in the providence of God must needs come but which having continued through His appointed time He now wills to remove and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him."
 

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