To die in the Valley with Jackson (Cedar Mountain)

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Sorah_45thVA

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Yesterday marked the 156 year since the battle of Cedar Mountain (or Slaughter Mtn.) Not only was this engagement the final instalment of Jackson's Valley Greatness but it was the opening act of the transition to Second Manasssas and ultimately Antitem. My fifth Great Grandfather (Burrell B. Sorah; 37th Virginia Infantry Co.A) was with Jackson during his mythical jaunt around Shenandoah Valley and gave the ultimate sacrifice here at Cedar Mountain. Honor and respect to the 37th, to my Kin who were engaged in this struggle, (Burrell had three brothers, all of whom enlisted and fought valiantly for southern rights.)**Deo Vindice

**One of his brothers fought the entire war in the 48th Virginia Infantry was one of only a handful to surrender at Appomatax and was present at Cedar Mountain when he fell. The other two enlisted in the 63rd Virginia and surrendered with Johnston in North Carolina**
 

Vicksburger

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View attachment 200295 Yesterday marked the 156 year since the battle of Cedar Mountain (or Slaughter Mtn.) Not only was this engagement the final instalment of Jackson's Valley Greatness but it was the opening act of the transition to Second Manasssas and ultimately Antitem. My fifth Great Grandfather (Burrell B. Sorah; 37th Virginia Infantry Co.A) was with Jackson during his mythical jaunt around Shenandoah Valley and gave the ultimate sacrifice here at Cedar Mountain. Honor and respect to the 37th, to my Kin who were engaged in this struggle, (Burrell had three brothers, all of whom enlisted and fought valiantly for southern rights.)**Deo Vindice

**One of his brothers fought the entire war in the 48th Virginia Infantry was one of only a handful to surrender at Appomatax and was present at Cedar Mountain when he fell. The other two enlisted in the 63rd Virginia and surrendered with Johnston in North Carolina**
Very nice post, you should be very proud of your ancestor, have you ever been to the Cedar Mountain battlefield?
 
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Sorah_45thVA

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Very nice post, you should be very proud of your ancestor, have you ever been to the Cedar Mountain battlefield?
I actually have not, I've seen Chancelorsville, Fredericksburg, Sharpsburg and Gettysburg with many more to come hopefully. Being a East Tenneassean I have seen nearly all the battles for Chattanooga and Knoxville and Chickamuaga several times. And recently learned that my two ancestors referenced above in the 63rd were both engaged on Snodgrass Hill and lost right at 1/3 of its numbers and I visted the battlefield last week having read a lot on that units movements and had the most out of body experience like it was like deja vuor something. So I would probably get a similar feeling at Slaughter Mountain. have you been to the field?
 

Vicksburger

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I actually have not, I've seen Chancelorsville, Fredericksburg, Sharpsburg and Gettysburg with many more to come hopefully. Being a East Tenneassean I have seen nearly all the battles for Chattanooga and Knoxville and Chickamuaga several times. And recently learned that my two ancestors referenced above in the 63rd were both engaged on Snodgrass Hill and lost right at 1/3 of its numbers and I visted the battlefield last week having read a lot on that units movements and had the most out of body experience like it was like deja vuor something. So I would probably get a similar feeling at Slaughter Mountain. have you been to the field?
No I have only read Krick's "Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain." I have mainly been to Shiloh, Corinth and Vicksburg. I have been to Chattanooga, beautiful place. I have not been to Sharpsburg but have heard many describe it as the best preserved battlefield.
 

Stone in the wall

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Thank's nice post Sohra now I gotta go. Shame I haven't because it's not far from here. Been to every thing around here close, started at age 6 saw first Manassas 100th year reenactment with my dad. 1961-1965 was a great time lots of great shows on TV and stuff. Nothing like modern times where they want to hide and destroy history. The grade school took us to Fort Ward in Alexandria. Lots of close places around here Harpers Ferry,Sharpsburg,Winchester,Martinsburg,ect Sharpsburg is great they have a very good set up. Plus Shepherds Town is just over the Potomac.My people were in the 33rd va inf from Lurray.
 
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BlueandGrayl

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I actually have not, I've seen Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, Sharpsburg and Gettysburg with many more to come hopefully. Being a East Tennessean I have seen nearly all the battles for Chattanooga and Knoxville and Chickamuaga several times. And recently learned that my two ancestors referenced above in the 63rd were both engaged on Snodgrass Hill and lost right at 1/3 of its numbers and I visted the battlefield last week having read a lot on that units movements and had the most out of body experience like it was like deja vuor something. So I would probably get a similar feeling at Slaughter Mountain. have you been to the field?
East Tennessee was one of the more Unionist regions of the South in an otherwise solidly Secessionist place. You have Confederate ancestors from Knoxville (East Tennessee's largest city). You know that East Tennessee along with North Alabama formed a Unionist area called Nickajack there were even proposals to make it into a reality.
 
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mofederal

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Thanks for the great photos. I really enjoyed them. Cedar mountain is a favorite battle. I have the SPI game somewhere in this house. I have always enjoyed reading about the battle.
 

Yankeedave

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Yes, one of the interesting little known of battles. Do take the time to visit if you can. A lot of work has been done there lately returning it to a more authentic state. They have also improved parking.
One of the forgotten spots around the battlefield is below. It is the place the majority of the Union artillery was placed. It gives a good view towards Jackson's position.
Cedar/Slaughter Mt. on left. Where the hook is in the woods to the right is where Jackson was. The road can be seen briefly paralleling the woods there. Jackson' artillery is to the left of there. To the left a bit would run the modern road coming towards and to the right of the viewer.
During:
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Below is Jackson's artillery spot. You are looking towards the battery seen in for ground. The farm in between is modern. The small clearing above the farm is the Union batteries spot.
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Below is the camp of the 88th P.V.I. The pic is taken from approximately from the same position as above but looking to the right down Jackson's towards cedar mt. catching that point of woods in between.
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In photo below the Union crossed from left to right. Everything was overgrown with corn. Beneath it was terrain like this:
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Yankeedave

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https://www.battlefields.org/learn/articles/new-insights-cedar-mountain-photography

Confederate troops set up their artillery along the intersection of the Orange-Culpeper Road and the Crittenden Lane, a spot that became known as “the Gate.” Although Confederate guns fired from this position for nearly two hours, Union cannon aimed deadly return fire and slowed the advance of Confederate infantry through this area. The Civil War Trust preserved 152 acres here in 1998.
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These side-by-side photos show a portion of the Crittenden Lane, “then and now.” The circled wood line in the August 1862 photo, left, still maintains the same contour today, as seen in the modern photo at right. The American Battlefield Trust land is on the right of the road and in the distant wood line.

These are looking across Jackson's front. They taken looking the opposite of each other.
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Cedar Mountain still looms over the battlefield in this “then and now” shot.
Library of Congress and Garry Adelman


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Beyond the field, you can still see the same small hill covered by a line of trees today as it appeared in the August 1862 photo.
Library of Congress and Garry Adelman
 

Jamieva

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I visited the battlefield last summer. It's a nice little spot to walk around, be warned the major walking tour may have some high grass/weeds depending on when they last cut it. They typically cut it nice and low right before the anniversary so that is the best time to visit to assure you are not wading in knee high stuff.
 
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Yankeedave

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Man, that was one hot spot too be in. Winder is dead, physicaly mangled, his body on the ground. Snowden Andrews is trailing intestines, badly wounded but he will survive. The few cannons that had been brought up are wrecked, the horse teams are dragging dead members clogging escape.
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All basically within the scope of the picture above. Jackson in the Trioni painting is a few yards to the left Original road runs north away from viewer. New York and Connecticut troops would be cresting to the left.
Viewer stands at "the gate". Seen below one would be seeing Jackson at end of road in Trioni painting.
the-gate-then-and-now_0 (1).jpg
 
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Yankeedave

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I always wondered if he didn't just break the leather jerking his sword. May have been quicker, the leather maybe dry like the sword is rusted. :D :wink:
 

James N.

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I always wondered if he didn't just break the leather jerking his sword. May have been quicker, the leather maybe dry like the sword is rusted. :D :wink:
Unlike enlisted men's sword belts, officers' belts have sword straps that terminate in little snap swivels, making it relatively quick and easy to remove the sword and its scabbard from them, making any other action unnecessary.
 
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