Restricted Third Gettysburg Address Found After 150 Years

Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Location
Santa Barbara, California
LGBAmanuscript1.JPG Few remember that two famous orators shared the spotlight with Lincoln at the Gettysburg dedication. The day’s concluding speech remained lost until recently, when an anthropologist stumbled upon it in a cardboard box at a remote ranch in Wyoming.

Edward Everett's two hour speech was distributed to the loyal press in advance, which left little room for the third featured speech of the day, which Lincoln, Seward and most other dignitaries attended.

The speaker was Charles Anderson, brother of Robert Anderson of Ft. Sumter fame. Charles was a slaveholder at the beginning of the war and the lieutenant-governor elect of Ohio.

I argue that the Gettysburg dedication was not only a memorial ceremony but the most important political event for the Lincoln administration since his election in 1860. His remarks, framed by two political opponents, can only be fully understood in the context of all three major speeches of the day. They operated as a rhetorical ensemble to accomplish distinctly political purposes and to kick off the 1864 re-election campaign.

Your thoughts?
 
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civilwarincolor

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Oct 27, 2012
Location
California
Few remember that two famous orators shared the spotlight with Lincoln at the Gettysburg dedication. The day’s concluding speech remained lost until recently, when an anthropologist stumbled upon it in a cardboard box at a remote ranch in Wyoming.

Edward Everett's two hour speech was distributed to the loyal press in advance, which left little room for the third featured speech of the day, which Lincoln, Seward and most other dignitaries attended.

The speaker was Charles Anderson, brother of Robert Anderson of Ft. Sumter fame. Charles was a slaveholder at the beginning of the war and the lieutenant-governor elect of Ohio.

I argue that the Gettysburg dedication was not only a memorial ceremony but the most important political event for the Lincoln administration since his election in 1860. His remarks, framed by two political opponents, can only be fully understood in the context of all three major speeches of the day. They operated as a rhetorical ensemble to accomplish distinctly political purposes and to kick off the 1864 re-election campaign.

Your thoughts?

LostGettysburgAddress -

I have to admit I was not familiar with Charles Anderson or this speech. What kind of reaction did he get from Lincoln, Seward or others in attendance on this speech? Was this "known" about in 1863 and then just forgotten? Is it possible to get a copy of the speech today? I would be interested to see what it was he had to say that Lincoln and Seward would attend.

As to a "kick off" to the 1864 election campaign, not sure if I agree with that. I think Lincoln's Gettysburg address transcends a political speech and is something that Lincoln would have done regardless of political opportunity. At the time it was dismissed by many as trite and trivial. I have always seen it as something to frame the war and it's purpose. It is more appreciated today than it was then. In my opinion if it had been the start of the reelection cycle it would be less remembered and regarded.
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2015
Location
Santa Barbara, California
LostGettysburgAddress -

I have to admit I was not familiar with Charles Anderson or this s
LostGettysburgAddress -

I have to admit I was not familiar with Charles Anderson or this speech. What kind of reaction did he get from Lincoln, Seward or others in attendance on this speech? Was this "known" about in 1863 and then just forgotten? Is it possible to get a copy of the speech today? I would be interested to see what it was he had to say that Lincoln and Seward would attend.

As to a "kick off" to the 1864 election campaign, not sure if I agree with that. I think Lincoln's Gettysburg address transcends a political speech and is something that Lincoln would have done regardless of political opportunity. At the time it was dismissed by many as trite and trivial. I have always seen it as something to frame the war and it's purpose. It is more appreciated today than it was then. In my opinion if it had been the start of the reelection cycle it would be less remembered and regarded.

peech. What kind of reaction did he get from Lincoln, Seward or others in attendance on this speech? Was this "known" about in 1863 and then just forgotten? Is it possible to get a copy of the speech today? I would be interested to see what it was he had to say that Lincoln and Seward would attend.

As to a "kick off" to the 1864 election campaign, not sure if I agree with that. I think Lincoln's Gettysburg address transcends a political speech and is something that Lincoln would have done regardless of political opportunity. At the time it was dismissed by many as trite and trivial. I have always seen it as something to frame the war and it's purpose. It is more appreciated today than it was then. In my opinion if it had been the start of the reelection cycle it would be less remembered and regarded.
Thanks CWIC. The speech is printed in my book The Lost Gettysburg Address for the first time. All we know from David Tod the governor of Ohio is that Lincoln and Seward"congratulated him"on the speech and that Anderson accompanied the president on the train back to Washington.
I do believe that Lincoln made the trip to honor the soldiers but it is also clear to me that his political friends and advisors used the occasion for expressly political purposes. See Gabor Borit and Martin Johnsons fine books on Lincoln address as they make this point strongly. Andersons speech was the most overtly political of the three and although he supports the war effort he differs with Lincoln on emancipation.
 

David Knight

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Location
Pontefract, Yorkshire.
I have never heard of Everett and I am thankful for having to listen to a two hour speech. Lincoln's brevity once again proves that it is quality rather than quantity that people and historians remember.
 
Joined
May 1, 2015
Location
Upstate N.Y.
I would never see Lincoln's Address as a political speech. Having not read Everett's I can't say. Any speech lasting two hours will have lost a very large percentage of the listeners attention long before two hours.
 

Rick Richter

Corporal
Joined
Dec 6, 2012
View attachment 84949 Few remember that two famous orators shared the spotlight with Lincoln at the Gettysburg dedication. The day’s concluding speech remained lost until recently, when an anthropologist stumbled upon it in a cardboard box at a remote ranch in Wyoming.

Edward Everett's two hour speech was distributed to the loyal press in advance, which left little room for the third featured speech of the day, which Lincoln, Seward and most other dignitaries attended.

The speaker was Charles Anderson, brother of Robert Anderson of Ft. Sumter fame. Charles was a slaveholder at the beginning of the war and the lieutenant-governor elect of Ohio.

I argue that the Gettysburg dedication was not only a memorial ceremony but the most important political event for the Lincoln administration since his election in 1860. His remarks, framed by two political opponents, can only be fully understood in the context of all three major speeches of the day. They operated as a rhetorical ensemble to accomplish distinctly political purposes and to kick off the 1864 re-election campaign.

Your thoughts?

You learn something every day! I wasn't aware of Anderson's speech. Speeches were considered entertainment then, so Everett's speech was designed to do that. Lincoln's speech clearly defined what the war was about, an important element since the reasons for the war were fractionated in the North. It's pointed brevity certainly served in defining a key plank of the Lincoln administration's platform
 

byron ed

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Location
Midwest
To keep this in perspective, Anderson's speech was not given at the actual dedication of the Soldier's National Cemetery as were Everett's and Lincoln's, but rather a while afterwards and indoors; at the crowded Gettysburg Presbyterian Church where Lincoln, Everett, Anderson and other dignitaries had retired to after the dedication.

So if not quite a third "Gettysburg address", Anderson's comments on the the occasion of the dedication are still likely significant imho. Add Dixon's book to the Christmas wish list.
 
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