Chamberlain "The Wounded Lion of the Union"

LoriAnn

Retired User
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
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Those of you on Facebook may have seen this recirculating (special thanks to our FB friend MJ for sharing it). It was a first for me, and I figured I'd post it here for anyone who missed it.

By Sarah Handley-Cousins

"At this year’s sesquicentennial of the battle of Gettysburg, thousands of visitors will wander the battlefields, contemplating the terrible and magnificent events of those three days. Many will make their way to one of the most compelling spots on the battlefield, the rocky tor called Little Round Top, where they will ponder, discuss, and probably argue about the deeds of one of the battle’s most famous participants, Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain of the 20th Maine.

On July 2, 1863, Chamberlain, who had been a professor at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Me., before the war, cemented his place in history by playing a crucial role in the defense of Little Round Top, protecting the Union line’s vulnerable left flank. After being prominently featured in Michael Shaara’s book “The Killer Angels” and its film adaptation, “Gettysburg,” Chamberlain is one of the most popular figures of the Civil War era. Visitors to Gettysburg this July won’t be able to make it down the street without seeing Chamberlain’s face on signs, T-shirts and key chains.

For most of those visitors, Chamberlain’s story begins and ends with his actions at Gettysburg. In reality, it was far more complicated – and much less glorious."


The rest here: The Wounded Lion of the Union . (Ugh. Technical difficulties with the darn link. Please stand by...)

Try this:

https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/05/the-wounded-lion-of-the-union/

* Click "continue to nytimes.com"

The last paragraph deserves quoting as well:

"Almost 20 years after the ball slammed through him, Chamberlain searched out the spot where he fell on the field at Petersburg. Bullets still littered the ground. As he gathered a few, Chamberlain asked “what it was all for, & what would come of it.” Undoubtedly many other disabled veterans wondered just the same thing."
 
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WJC

Major General
Judge Adv. Genl.
Thread Medic
Answered the Call for Reinforcements
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
02disunion-images-slide-DT3A-blog427.jpg



Those of you on Facebook may have seen this recirculating (special thanks to our FB friend MJ for sharing it). It was a first for me, and I figured I'd post it here for anyone who missed it.

By Sarah Handley-Cousins

"At this year’s sesquicentennial of the battle of Gettysburg, thousands of visitors will wander the battlefields, contemplating the terrible and magnificent events of those three days. Many will make their way to one of the most compelling spots on the battlefield, the rocky tor called Little Round Top, where they will ponder, discuss, and probably argue about the deeds of one of the battle’s most famous participants, Col. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain of the 20th Maine.

On July 2, 1863, Chamberlain, who had been a professor at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Me., before the war, cemented his place in history by playing a crucial role in the defense of Little Round Top, protecting the Union line’s vulnerable left flank. After being prominently featured in Michael Shaara’s book “The Killer Angels” and its film adaptation, “Gettysburg,” Chamberlain is one of the most popular figures of the Civil War era. Visitors to Gettysburg this July won’t be able to make it down the street without seeing Chamberlain’s face on signs, T-shirts and key chains.

For most of those visitors, Chamberlain’s story begins and ends with his actions at Gettysburg. In reality, it was far more complicated – and much less glorious."


The rest here: The Wounded Lion of the Union . (Ugh. Technical difficulties with the darn link. Please stand by...)

Try this:

https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/05/the-wounded-lion-of-the-union/

* Click "continue to nytimes.com"

The last paragraph deserves quoting as well:

"Almost 20 years after the ball slammed through him, Chamberlain searched out the spot where he fell on the field at Petersburg. Bullets still littered the ground. As he gathered a few, Chamberlain asked “what it was all for, & what would come of it.” Undoubtedly many other disabled veterans wondered just the same thing."
Thanks for sharing this outstanding article!
We read about the thousands of men injured during the rebellion, too often failing to appreciate what that meant. So many were left invalids for life or had life-long disabilities. And in the case of many- like Chamberlain- we don't know what they suffered because it was not openly discussed.
I wish I could confidently say that things are better today. Thanks to all who served and are serving.
 
Joined
Jan 24, 2017
That was a tough read @LoriAnn , and the strength of character and perseverance shown by Chamberlain is an indication of what made him a hero in the first place. It only makes me admire him even more. Thanks for sharing.
 
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Gentizzy

Private
Joined
May 4, 2017
When Louisiana Rep. Scalise was wounded while at baseball practice, a doctor on a cable news network actually said that Scalise was shot in the hip, no big deal (!) I couldn't believe he said that, as I immediately thought of Chamberlain's grave wound at Petersburg.
Scalise nearly died from complications but thankfully recovered.
 

rpkennedy

Lt. Colonel
Member of the Year
Joined
May 18, 2011
Location
Carlisle, PA
Some claim Sgt Tozier orgainized and ordered the bayonet charge on LRT that made Chamberlin famous.

Or Lt. Homan Melcher. Or several other claimants. As much as I do pick on Chamberlain and his fans, my money is still on him as the source of the charge order.

Ryan
 

TracyM61

Corporal
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada
Nice thread @LoriAnn. What a remarkable human being. It's a wonder he lived as long as he did. Very sad too that a lot of the veterans from the ACW didn't have much of life afterward, relegated to "...soldier’s homes, poorhouses, prisons and asylums." I'm very surprised that the government didn't do more for them after all they did for the country...
 
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