The South Carolina Secession convention, day by day

Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,503
Location
South Carolina
#81
Inglis looks to the future celebrations of independence day for the new Union "about to be born". He hopes for centuries of celebration as people look back.

qUL3C0G.jpg


Mr. INGLIS. Mr. President, I desire to say that it seems to me that we ought to realize, and perhaps we do, unless our minds are too much excited by the nature of the occasion in which we are now engaged, that this is a very great event, a very solemn event - it is an event not confined to ourselves, but, for aught we can see, to the people of every portion of the Confederacy and perhaps other nations - because a great political change like this cannot take place without being felt to a wide extent throughout the nations of the earth. Now, sir, I suppose I am as much opposed as any man on this floor to anything like demonstration to which the American people are so much devoted, yet I am not opposed to a proper solemnity attending such an act as the ratification of this Ordinance. One word more, sir, - I say we ought to realize the advantage of this act. Sir, the history of the past in our own country justifies us in anticipating the success which will attend us finally, in the consummation of our hopes, and that this day, for perhaps at least three fourths of a century to come, and let us hope for centuries to come, shall be celebrated as a day in the history of the Union now about to be born; and it is not wise, it is not worth the while, considering that the whole act should not be divided into parcels, but if possible that the whole should be celebrated on one single day, forever to be remembered in the calendar of the year.
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,503
Location
South Carolina
#82
The discussion on when to make the Ordinance official continues after Inglis finishes, and a couple of interesting mindsets jumped out at me.
YLZg77z.jpg


McCrady has no desire to hide the secession proceedings:

Mr. McCRADY. Mr. President, I will remark that this act of ours should be done in broad daylight, before all our citizens: it ought to be proclaimed in Columbia as well as in Charleston; in the Capital as well as in the city. It should be done to-morrow, at 12 o'clock. We do not march, as they do at the North, in torchlight processions, and do what we do openly.​

Mr. Keitt looks to the future, just like Inglis. These men are concerned about posterity, and how their actions will be viewed.
Mr. KEITT. Mr. President, I trust that motion will not prevail. I think we can perform this ceremony much better to-morrow than to-night. It is very well known that very many members did not sign the Declaration of Independence until two or three weeks after that Declaration had been written and made public. Many of them signed it between the 10th and 15th of July. I do not see, if the act is already consummated to-day, how we can lose anything by ratifying it to-morrow. Sir, we are performing a great act which involving not only the stirring present, but embracing the whole great future of the ages to come. I have been engaged in this movement ever since I have entered political life. I am content with what has been done to-day, and content with what will take place to-morrow. I would have preferred to have adopted the resolution of the gentleman from Richland, and have adjourned afterwards. We have carried the body of this Union to its last resting place, and now we will drop the flag over its grave. After that is done, I am ready to adjourn and leave the remaining ceremonies for to-morrow.​

Mr. Adams thinks that since everyone is in attendance, which might not be the case tomorrow, the Ordinance should be signed while every last member is present.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
5,715
Location
Texas
#83
The discussion on when to make the Ordinance official continues after Inglis finishes, and a couple of interesting mindsets jumped out at me.
View attachment 295310

McCrady has no desire to hide the secession proceedings:

Mr. McCRADY. Mr. President, I will remark that this act of ours should be done in broad daylight, before all our citizens: it ought to be proclaimed in Columbia as well as in Charleston; in the Capital as well as in the city. It should be done to-morrow, at 12 o'clock. We do not march, as they do at the North, in torchlight processions, and do what we do openly.​

Mr. Keitt looks to the future, just like Inglis. These men are concerned about posterity, and how their actions will be viewed.
Mr. KEITT. Mr. President, I trust that motion will not prevail. I think we can perform this ceremony much better to-morrow than to-night. It is very well known that very many members did not sign the Declaration of Independence until two or three weeks after that Declaration had been written and made public. Many of them signed it between the 10th and 15th of July. I do not see, if the act is already consummated to-day, how we can lose anything by ratifying it to-morrow. Sir, we are performing a great act which involving not only the stirring present, but embracing the whole great future of the ages to come. I have been engaged in this movement ever since I have entered political life. I am content with what has been done to-day, and content with what will take place to-morrow. I would have preferred to have adopted the resolution of the gentleman from Richland, and have adjourned afterwards. We have carried the body of this Union to its last resting place, and now we will drop the flag over its grave. After that is done, I am ready to adjourn and leave the remaining ceremonies for to-morrow.​

Mr. Adams thinks that since everyone is in attendance, which might not be the case tomorrow, the Ordinance should be signed while every last member is present.
Or, more importantly they don't want second thoughts and doubts changing VOTES, did they!:whistling:

Kevin Dally
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
7,503
Location
South Carolina
#84
Or, more importantly they don't want second thoughts and doubts changing VOTES, did they!:whistling:

Kevin Dally
I can't read minds. There is certainly a "strike while the iron is hot" mentality running through this convention. The fact that South Carolina was, ultimately, the only state that was unanimous in the vote for secession probably tells us something about the commitment level of the delegates. Every other state had some level of dissent, SC did not.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
5,715
Location
Texas
#85
I can't read minds. There is certainly a "strike while the iron is hot" mentality running through this convention. The fact that South Carolina was, ultimately, the only state that was unanimous in the vote for secession probably tells us something about the commitment level of the delegates. Every other state had some level of dissent, SC did not.
I...wonder how many of those Delegates actually shouldered a musket in the ranks?

Kevin Dally
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
5,715
Location
Texas
#87
What has that to do with the day-by-day goings on at the convention?
Thinking out loud, I find Andersonh1 actually brought up a point I had never thought of, the unanimity of the votes from everyone. I was wondering if any of the signers actually fought in the ranks afterwards, sort of a "they put their money where their mouth was". I know Texas had several signers fight, Gen John Gregg coming to mind.
Just a thought.

Kevin Dally
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Messages
18,831
Location
Laurinburg NC
#89
I can't read minds. There is certainly a "strike while the iron is hot" mentality running through this convention. The fact that South Carolina was, ultimately, the only state that was unanimous in the vote for secession probably tells us something about the commitment level of the delegates. Every other state had some level of dissent, SC did not.
Hurrah for South Carolina. :thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top