The South Carolina Leader: Creating a Black Press in the Heart of the Confederacy

Joined
Oct 26, 2012
Messages
9,538
#21
Now please, understand I cannot speak for @Rebforever, but if my predilection is correct he is referring to newspaper misinformation, prevalent in quoting unverified facts for a story on a competitive time schedule. For all practical purposes, the way I see this story and my comment about the proof, is due to the fact they witnessed the overall general scheme of southern character before the war, etc. They were making first-hand analogies, which plumbed the intangible spirit of the southern man, I felt very adequately, and it sure fit the passage of Mark which was their beacon light at the helm.
Lubliner.
:thumbsup:
 

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
601
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
#22
As far as newspapers run in that era, by 1869 under it's new owners, subscription was 2000, and circulation would have been higher, by sharing the paper with the neighbor. A general practice it would be passed around. Uncommon was the lack of gossip for strictly local residents for knowing the latest talk, at least it claims no personal agenda to do so. National affairs and the good causes they wish to promote, such as black colleges, or churches, organizations etc. It is a business approach to influence for the good of the people, the present actions taking place, but it hinges on a budget. Apparently it went kaput, for lack of funding, or for being edged out in some competitive way, subversive or not?? It allows nothing more than a reading of the current pulse and pace in society, and the hurdles confronting them. It is editorialized most likely, which deals with matters of opinion. Newspapers are an empire unto themselves.
Lubliner.
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
601
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
#27
The first issue of the paper (Oct. 7, 1865) devoted a quarter of its space to reprinting the proposed South Carolina Constitution. The articles included one asking for people the keep an open mind on mixed race marriages.
I am hoping you may have more to add, since we ran off with the leader. This one bit of humble request on their part must have brought a certain amount of chagrin to many Charlestonians. In reflecting on the temper of the conquered south, and how much more they could endure with their pride, it is a bold undertaking for a publication at that time. The soldiers and their kin had hardly any time to say 'What now?' when this is distributed. Were they addressing the black community?
Lubliner/
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
29,053
Location
Long Island, NY
#28
I am hoping you may have more to add, since we ran off with the leader. This one bit of humble request on their part must have brought a certain amount of chagrin to many Charlestonians. In reflecting on the temper of the conquered south, and how much more they could endure with their pride, it is a bold undertaking for a publication at that time. The soldiers and their kin had hardly any time to say 'What now?' when this is distributed. Were they addressing the black community?
Lubliner/
Here it is, via the NY Tribune:

misc1.JPG

ence.
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
601
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
#29
I would almost feel that presenting a European perspective to a defeated American race of white men as an example for leniency to be somewhat chaffing. I could almost bet the newspaper was designed to be read among the Freedmen in society, and almost as a premonition of what may come. The idea is sound in its judgment, as well, if read by any white men of southern class, to be used as a lawful claim for freedom of speech without being disrespectful. Trying to stay out of harm's way is one goal, while spreading news of good hope another. It is a precarious balancing act when you stop and realize public opinion and the right of majority rule. These freedmen were not in any race to mix, and if it so happened, to be aware. Meanwhile brother white turns red as a beet.
Lubliner.
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
29,053
Location
Long Island, NY
#30
I would almost feel that presenting a European perspective to a defeated American race of white men as an example for leniency to be somewhat chaffing. I could almost bet the newspaper was designed to be read among the Freedmen in society, and almost as a premonition of what may come. The idea is sound in its judgment, as well, if read by any white men of southern class, to be used as a lawful claim for freedom of speech without being disrespectful. Trying to stay out of harm's way is one goal, while spreading news of good hope another. It is a precarious balancing act when you stop and realize public opinion and the right of majority rule. These freedmen were not in any race to mix, and if it so happened, to be aware. Meanwhile brother white turns red as a beet.
Lubliner.
The readers of the paper knew that "race mixing" was nothing new, either in Europe or in the American South. It had been going on for generations.
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
601
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
#31
The readers of the paper knew that "race mixing" was nothing new, either in Europe or in the American South. It had been going on for generations.
Yes, and many mulattos were born already by slave women under duress. Now came the notion of freedom for the blacks, and a reversal, so to say, for the opportunity and happenstance now existing. To believe the white southern women were blind to African physique and a humble spirit of openness and heartfelt gratitude, one would be deaf as well. The white men that once ruled would be intimidated, jealous, and scornful of any advances made, and creating a dangerous environment. This was a freedom unknown in our land.
Lubliner.
 

JPK Huson 1863

Colonel
Forum Host
Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Messages
17,324
Location
Central Pennsylvania
#32
The readers of the paper knew that "race mixing" was nothing new, either in Europe or in the American South. It had been going on for generations.

Yes, and this country had it too- been trying to run down where in blazes we lost it so completely no one mentions it, has recorded much ( beyond records )or can ( for some reason ) admit we once ran around marrying each other based on the usual premises. You know, liked each other. Interested to see the Leader's article on marriage.

Genuinely think we experienced a Dark Ages.

Plus, why would it have been impossible for black journalists to be educated men? Not seeing it. Can't tell anyone the number of 1850's to 1860's ambryo's I have images of, era, dapper young men making you smile like they do- orphaned from ID's, seem like the typical college guys.
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
601
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
#33
Yes, and this country had it too- been trying to run down where in blazes we lost it so completely no one mentions it, has recorded much ( beyond records )or can ( for some reason ) admit we once ran around marrying each other based on the usual premises. You know, liked each other. Interested to see the Leader's article on marriage.

Genuinely think we experienced a Dark Ages.

Plus, why would it have been impossible for black journalists to be educated men? Not seeing it. Can't tell anyone the number of 1850's to 1860's ambryo's I have images of, era, dapper young men making you smile like they do- orphaned from ID's, seem like the typical college guys.
No impossibility at all for northern gentleman, but for southern slaves in Charleston, an education would have been rare, and illegal, wouldn't it? And they started in 1865-6 with their first publishment. Yes, they still could have been educated, and possibly claimed a freedom during the war. The south was always peculiar about making certain exceptions to the rule. Ever notice that?
Lubliner.
 

Pat Young

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Featured Book Reviewer
Joined
Jan 7, 2013
Messages
29,053
Location
Long Island, NY
#34
Yes, and this country had it too- been trying to run down where in blazes we lost it so completely no one mentions it, has recorded much ( beyond records )or can ( for some reason ) admit we once ran around marrying each other based on the usual premises. You know, liked each other. Interested to see the Leader's article on marriage.

Genuinely think we experienced a Dark Ages.
We did have an age of forgetting.
 
Joined
Mar 25, 2014
Messages
835
#35
It does seems to me that the guys who started the paper were southern pro-Union black men. Although the paper did start after the war, when the issue of Union vs Confederacy had been resolved.

- Alan
Thomas Hurley and Allen Coffin were white. Richard Cain was born in West Virginia and moved to Ohio at age six. He lived in Ohio, Illinois, Missouri and New York before moving to South Carolina. Alonzo Ransier was the son of mixed race Haitian immigrants and born free in Charleston.
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
8,461
Location
District of Columbia
#36
Thomas Hurley and Allen Coffin were white. Richard Cain was born in West Virginia and moved to Ohio at age six. He lived in Ohio, Illinois, Missouri and New York before moving to South Carolina. Alonzo Ransier was the son of mixed race Haitian immigrants and born free in Charleston.
I see the confusion. Thomas Hurley and Allen Coffin founded the Charleston Leader. I was referring to Cain and Ransier as the guys who started the Charleston Missionary Record, which did begin as the Leader, but whose name was changed after Cain and Ransier bought it.

Using the naming conventions of the day, both Cain and Ransier were considered Negroes, with Cain probably considered black and Rainser considered mulatto. Cain, as noted earlier, was raised in the North, while Ransier was raised in his native Charleston.

- Alan
 
Joined
Feb 6, 2010
Messages
8,461
Location
District of Columbia
#37
No impossibility at all for northern gentleman, but for southern slaves in Charleston, an education would have been rare, and illegal, wouldn't it? And they started in 1865-6 with their first publishment. Yes, they still could have been educated, and possibly claimed a freedom during the war. The south was always peculiar about making certain exceptions to the rule. Ever notice that?
Lubliner.
Charleston, SC did have 3200 free blacks when the war began, and that was one of the largest groups of free blacks in a southern city (or any US city, for that matter). In fact, Charleston had more free blacks than did the entire state of Arkansas, or Alabama, of Florida, or Mississippi; and it had almost as many free blacks as the state of Georgia.

Both Cain and Ransier were free blacks.

- Alan
 
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Messages
601
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
#38
Charleston, SC did have 3200 free blacks when the war began, and that was one of the largest groups of free blacks in a southern city (or any US city, for that matter). In fact, Charleston had more free blacks than did the entire state of Arkansas, or Alabama, of Florida, or Mississippi; and it had almost as many free blacks as the state of Georgia.

Both Cain and Ransier were free blacks.

- Alan
With these statistics you must take into account the black population et. al. in the State, or even in the city. The ratio of free to enslaved will give a more accurate rendition of these numbers without inflation. But 3200 I do not doubt, though I am a bit surprised.
Lubliner.
 



(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Top