The secession of Southern California.

major bill

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In Southern California there was wide support for the Confedercy. There was some thoughts of them seceding from California and forming a Confederate state in Southern California. The U.S. Army invaded the area and the secession was not successful. Was there any real chance that the secessionist of Southern California could have been successful? Southern California was a long way from the nearest support that the Confedercy could supply. Still the U.S. Army did not have many resources to use to stop Southern California from becoming a new Confederate state.

In my opinion the only real chance for Southern California from becoming a Confederate state was if the Californians in the northern part of California refused to support an invasion of Southern California by federal forces. How much support there would have been in Northern California for allowing Southern California to secede if violence would have broken out is an open question. It is possible that if the federal government attempted to invade Southern California that Northern California would have rebelled and joined Southern California. One problem of Northern Californian support was that Southern California did not vote to secede and some citizens in Northern California could have seen the secession of Southern California as not fully legal.

Should have the secessionists of Southern California resisted the federal invasion? I can not say how successful the secessionists of Southern California would have been in resisting the federal invasion, the U.S. Army did not have many soldiers in the federal invasion force. Still one would have to research the military capabilities of the pro Southern militia forces in Southam California to resist the federal invasion.
 

Lubliner

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From what I understand the Federal Army in Los Angeles area quashed the confederate resistance, seeking members out and having them arrested. Most were able to head south with the idea of crossing into Mexico and back up into New Mexico to join up. These men were stopped somewhere near the Arizona territory, a group of 26 or more, and eventually let go. Most of this information comes from the O. R., Volume 50, Parts 1 and 2. They really never had a chance out west. The army was garrisoned in forts for protecting settlers from the Indians, sending out scouting parties all along the Pacific Cost.
Lubliner.
 

AshleyMel

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There was also secession sentiments in the San Joaquin/Central Valley. Camp Babbit in Visalia, CA was to keep order in the area. Can't have Secessionist or those pesky Paiute Indians causing a ruckus. :wink:
Camp Babbitt's first commander, Lieutenant Colonel George S. Evans said of the pro-Confederates,
"It is an everyday occurrence for them to ride through the streets of Visalia and hurrah for Jeff Davis and Stonewall Jackson, and often give groans for the Stars and Stripes,".
 

Joshism

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In Southern California there was wide support for the Confedercy. There was some thoughts of them seceding from California and forming a Confederate state in Southern California. The U.S. Army invaded the area and the secession was not successful. Was there any real chance that the secessionist of Southern California could have been successful? Southern California was a long way from the nearest support that the Confedercy could supply. Still the U.S. Army did not have many resources to use to stop Southern California from becoming a new Confederate state.

How does one invade a part of one's own country, especially one that has not seceded?

What was the motivation of SoCal secessionists? Were they mostly people who moved there from the South?

Regardless of white support for the CSA I don't imagine the Hispanic population would have any reason to support it.
 

Lubliner

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How does one invade a part of one's own country, especially one that has not seceded?

What was the motivation of SoCal secessionists? Were they mostly people who moved there from the South?

Regardless of white support for the CSA I don't imagine the Hispanic population would have any reason to support it.
Political clout is one motivation, and controlling the interests of a rich country while determining it's future would indeed be a bargaining chip on the National scale. Take over by means of banding together, whatever secessionists had in mind would be futile. There were too many Union troops located all along the Pacific coast in forts from San Diego up through Oregon and Washington territories. But politically speaking, a government of wealthy citizens backed by a small group of armed men controlling some vital spots could help influence major decisions concerning the State.
Lubliner.
 

SeaTurtle

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Regardless of white support for the CSA I don't imagine the Hispanic population would have any reason to support it.

Actually there was Hispanic "Californio" support for secession and the CSA. The Los Angeles Mounted Rifles, a pro-Confederate militia unit in Southern California, included Hispanics among its members. You can find details below:

http://www.militarymuseum.org/LosAngelesMountedRifles2.html

It's important to remember that the US annexation of California from Mexico was still well within living memory at this time, so it was easy for local Californios to still feel bitterness at having their homeland forced into the USA.
 
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SeaTurtle

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How much support there would have been in Northern California for allowing Southern California to secede if violence would have broken out is an open question.

The Knights of the Golden Circle had a branch in San Francisco. They were involved in a failed plot to outfit a Confederate privateer there in 1863. I don't know about the sentiment of the wider northern-California population though.
 

SeaTurtle

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For those interested, below is an article from the Sacramento Daily Union (February 1861) about secessionist sympathies in California. The writer seems to take a pro-Union slant. But it seems that the idea of California secession (by the whole state, not just the southern part) was being tossed around at the time (primarily by Dixie-born residents, if the article is to be believed).

https://cdnc.ucr.edu/?a=d&d=SDU18610208.2.7&e=-------en--20--1--txt-txIN--------1
 

SeaTurtle

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Apparently Asbury Harpending, the leader of the failed privateer plot in San Francisco that I mentioned above, was also involved in some schemes ca. 1860-61 to have California secede into a "Pacific Republic" (possibly together with Oregon, I've seen conflicting claims in different sources on whether the idea was just California or California and Oregon together). The concept was banking on Albert Sidney Johnston (commander of the army's Department of the Pacific) siding with the South. Which he did, but not before resigning and leaving California, evaporating the hope for military support that these "Pacific Republic" secessionists had.
 
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