The Search for Black Confederate Soldiers: Troops raised March & April 1865

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#61
I have not seen that either, but there is a mention of one in nearby Mobile in this 1863 article:

Sunbury American. (Sunbury, Pa.) 1848-1879, September 12, 1863 - "...That the Confederates armed negroes at the outset of their rebellion we have already shown. They did so in Mobile, even before the battle of Bull Run. They did so in Louisiana before one negro had been allowed to put on the uniform of the United States, and black regiments had an honorable position in their grand parade in the Autumn of '61. They did so in Tennessee, even before they had openly seceded from the Union..."
This may sound assumptive, but I have A gut feeling this is an exaggeration by a paper trying to promote the idea of black soldiers, by using the opposition as an example. If it's written in Pennsylvania in 1863, how were they able to verify the confederate use of blacks as combat troops?
 

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#62
This may sound assumptive, but I have A gut feeling this is an exaggeration by a paper trying to promote the idea of black soldiers, by using the opposition as an example. If it's written in Pennsylvania in 1863, how were they able to verify the confederate use of blacks as combat troops?
I posted the article extract to demonstrate that there was more than one report of black CSA soldiers in Alabama, and in the hope that it might help 19th Georgia track down the source that William Wells Brown used in his book, if he has more than one place to look.
 

jgoodguy

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#63
I posted the article extract to demonstrate that there was more than one report of black CSA soldiers in Alabama, and in the hope that it might help 19th Georgia track down the source that William Wells Brown used in his book, if he has more than one place to look.
Sometimes enough breadcrumbs will lead to an answer.
 

19thGeorgia

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#64
Mobile, AL

"...during the final siege of Mobile, all male Creoles were ordered to report for local defense, along with other free blacks. The Native Guard, comprised of Creoles, actually served in the fortifications before the city, risking their lives in defense of the old order." -Urban Emancipation by Michael W. Fitzgerald, p.14
Here's the order to organize Local Defense companies.
Mobile Evening News, March 20, 1865-
MobileEvenNews20mar1865a.jpg
 

19thGeorgia

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#65
Review
March 7 Hospitals, Richmond, VA- 2 Companies (150 men)
March 15 Maj's Turner & Pegram, Richmond, VA- 2+ Companies (200?)
March 20 Mobile, AL- 1 Company (100?)
March 27 Capt. Cameron, Petersburg, VA- ?
March 28 Capt. Ring, Montgomery, AL- ?
Mar-Apr North Carolina- 300
April 1 Col. Otey, Lynchburg, VA- ?
April 7 Gen. Morgan, Alabama- ?
April 8 Col. Zinken, Columbus, GA- ?
 
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19thGeorgia

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#66
Capt. William H. S. Burgwyn
North Carolina


Was Burgwyn the one who raised troops in North Carolina? There was a lot of letter writing. In the last one, the War Dept. and A&IGO make note as having received it on April 8 (CSA government was at Danville, VA, at the time) but was authority ever granted?-

March 23, 1865
BurgwynLetter1.jpg

BurgwynLetter1a.jpg


March 29, 1865
BurgwynLetter2.jpg

BurgwynLetter2a.jpg


BurgwynVance.jpg
 

jgoodguy

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#67
IMHO a problem in the search is the chaos of the approaching room of the CSA. Bad communications, lack of organization, lack of time to organize an unique activity, changing priorities, loss and destruction of records means missing evidence.
 

19thGeorgia

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#69
Major James W. Pegram
Major Thomas P. Turner
Richmond, VA


Officers: orders given by John W. Reily, recruiting officers J. W. Pegram and Thomas Turner
Place of recruitment: based in Richmond, appealing to the state of Virginia

Published in the newspaper precisely because the two recruiting officers wanted to get the word out and appeal to the largest number of people.

The daily dispatch. (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, March 16, 1865
View attachment 292226

The daily dispatch. (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, March 16, 1865
View attachment 292225
Richmond Daily Dispatch, March 16, 1865-
Daily_dispatch_1865-03-16_2.png



Offers to purchase the freedom of slaves.

Richmond Whig, March 21, 1865-
RichmondWhig21mar1865.jpg


Richmond Whig, March 24, 1865-
Richmond_Whig_1865-03-24_[2].png


Richmond Examiner, March 27, 1865 ("the company")-
RichmondExaminer27mar1865a.png

RichmondExaminer27mar1865b.jpg

RichmondExaminer27mar1865c.jpg



"From thirty to forty such slaves wanted."
Richmond Examiner, March 27, 1865-
RichmondExam27mar1865a.jpg

RichmondExam27mar1865.jpg



Richmond Examiner, April 3, 1865 ("the battalion")-
RichmondExam3apr1865.jpg
 
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#71
Odd thing I'm noticing: A surprising number of these "officers" recruiting these units are Doctors. Dr. Jackson Chambliss, Dr. Henry Scott, Dr. Hale.
Wonder why. Maybe because they knew how bad the casualties had gotten? Maybe they received more liberalized education and were more willing to be open minded about the issue?
 

19thGeorgia

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#72
Capt. William H. S. Burgwyn
North Carolina


Was Burgwyn the one who raised troops in North Carolina? There was a lot of letter writing. In the last one, the War Dept. and A&IGO make note as having received it on April 8 (CSA government was at Danville, VA, at the time) but was authority ever granted?-

March 23, 1865
View attachment 293633
View attachment 293634

March 29, 1865
View attachment 293636
View attachment 293637

View attachment 293638
There are letters and a diary by Burgwyn but they do not cover the period of April 1865.

http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/search...--Correspondence/mode/exact/order/date/page/1

http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p15012coll8/id/10535
 

19thGeorgia

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#74
Union accounts of the events of April 5, 1865

Brig. General H. E. Davies:
"I moved out from camp under instructions to make a reconnaissance on the enemy's rear and ascertain the position of his trains. Passing through Amelia Springs I moved to Paineville and there learned that General Lee's wagon train was passing a point about four miles from that town. I immediately moved down at the trot, sending the First Pennsylvania Cavalry, my advance, ahead at the gallop, and they succeeded in striking the train just as a piece of artillery had been placed in position to repel my advance. Before the piece could be loaded my men, charging through a deep swamp, were upon them and at once captured the artillery and men belonging to the battery and scattered the train guard at that point, of about 400 men, in all directions. I sent two regiments (First Pennsylvania and Twenty-fourth New York) at once to the right, along the length of the train, directing them to capture all animals and prisoners and destroy all wagons, as owing to the condition of the road and the exhausted state of the teams I did not deem it practicable to bring off the wagons....The commanding officers of these regiments each executed the orders given them with fidelity and zeal, and in a short time I was on my return to Jetersville with 5 guns, 11 flags, 320 white prisoners, and equal number of colored teamsters, and over 400 animals, captured from the enemy, leaving behind me 200 blazing ammunition had headquarters wagons, caissons, and ambulances. Shortly after leaving Paineville, on my return, Gary's brigade of rebel cavalry, acting as esort to the train, attacked my rear guard and kept up a running fight with my command as far as Amelia Springs, where I formed my brigade and held the enemy in check until relieved by the Second Brigade of the division."
War of the Rebellion, Series 1, Volume 46, part 1, p.1145

Col. Hampton S. Thomas, 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry:
"About one o'clock that night, as we lay to horse, the First Pennsylvania Cavalry was ordered to mount and report to General Sheridan at once. Under Sheridan's fly I found General Crook (who was now in command of Gregg's old division) and General Davies looking over a map. I was shown the position where the enemy were supposed to be, near Amelia Court-House, and was instructed to proceed with my regiment about two or three miles in advance of our brigade, press through all small detachments, and attack the enemy's wagon-train at daylight. We reached some high ground just as the sun was rising, and below at our feet lay the whole rebel army in line of battle, apparently sound asleep.
It was a beautiful sight to look upon. Here instructions were given to the men that when the charge was sounded by the bugles they should yell like demons and tell all the rebels they met, particularly the officers, that Sheridan and all his cavalry corps were upon them. This regiment with its three hundred veterans charged through a number of outlying commands, destroying about three hundred wagons, cutting out twelve hundred head of horses and mules, capturing eight hundred prisoners, eleven rebel battle-flags, and a bright, new spick-and-span battery of Armstrong field-guns, which shortly before had been presented by the ladies of Liverpool to the corporation of the city of Richmond. We held our ground and captures until General Davies came to our relief, which he did very promptly....
The First Pennsylvania Cavalry joined the brigade and resumed the fighting, for the rebels were very sore over the captures and were trying hard to retake their guns, but we succeeded in getting back to Jetersville safely."
"Some Personal Reminiscences of Service in the Cavalry of the Army of the Potomac," The United Service: A Monthly Review of Military and Naval Affairs, Volume 1 (Jan. 1889), pp.24-25

New York Times, April 14, 1865:

"Jetersville, Amelia County, Va., Wednesday Evening, April 5.
This morning, Davies' brigade, of the Second, moved out to Painesville, and two miles from that place, on the Amelia Court-house road, ran into the head of a rebel wagon train, ten miles long. A dash was at once made, and without much difficulty the following captures were made:
Five Whitworth field guns and caissons complete.
320 prisoners, besides three Colonels and ten other officers. Col. Hare, formerly Chief of Artillery on Van Dorn's Staff, and more recently on Bragg's, was one of the Colonels.
Robert E. Lee's headquarter wagon:
Longstreet's headquarter wagon and flag.
150 horses.
500 mules.
9 flags of different kinds.
250 wagons destroyed, and several hundred negroes were brought in. The rebel infantry coming up, Davies was forced to retire, leaving the balance of the train."

One of the flags captured by the 1st Pennsylvania Cavalry at Painesville. It has inverted colors like those of the trans-Mississippi, but was captured in the east-
1551902511293.png
 



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