The Search for Black Confederate Soldiers: Troops raised March & April 1865


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Luke Freet

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Thanks, you gave me help!
I had done the same research years ago, then erased the file folder by mistake. I have not repeated the research, but I remember that I had found news of many units enrolled and trained throughout the South and many officers assigned to the command.
You have no clue how much i wish i could have seen that officer listing.
 

jgoodguy

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There are two volumes by Riley with similar titles- "History of the Baptists of Alabama" and one published later called "Memorial History of the Baptists of Alabama." Fleming is referring to the first one.
There is 2 references for the footnote [154] Riley, “Baptists of Alabama,” p. 305; O. R., Ser. IV, Vol. III, p. 1193.
 

19thGeorgia

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There is 2 references for the footnote [154] Riley, “Baptists of Alabama,” p. 305; O. R., Ser. IV, Vol. III, p. 1193.
Not too sure about the second one that refers to Capt. Ring. He was given authority to raise troops on March 28. The Battle of Selma was April 2.
 

jgoodguy

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Not too sure about the second one that refers to Capt. Ring. He was given authority to raise troops on March 28. The Battle of Selma was April 2.
Apparently, no one has digitalized Riley, “Baptists of Alabama,” I almost found one, but it had been dropped from EBSCOHOST. There is a physical copy at the Birmingham Library if I get really motivated.
 

Luke Freet

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I find it downright absurd the openmindedness of Cleburne's men about the issue of Black troops.
Another great example: The diarist Captain Sam Foster (from Granbury's Texas Brigade), on his way home at the end, wrote of how he believed the black man, given enough education, will equal the white man in society (in a positive connotation). https://civilwartalk.com/threads/confederate-captain-samuel-foster-and-mlk-day.130553/#post-1459919
You never see this fanaticism in any other denomination of the Confederate military.
 

19thGeorgia

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Did any of the March 1865 black Confederate soldiers see combat? There is a good case to be made that some did. possibly on more than one occasion. According to Major Scott's report, they were taken to the Petersburg trenches before the Confederate Congress passed the recruitment law.

Officers: Colonel Scott Shipp, VMI; Major Henry C. Scott
Place of recruitment: Jackson Hospital, Richmond, recruited by Dr. F. W. Hancock, Dr Chambliss

View attachment 292234

From the National Archives, RG 109 (Administrative Files – Subject Index: Ships – Zouaves, Box # 5 , “Slaves” Folder)​
Hd Qrs Jackson Battalion​
March 16th 1865​
Sir​
I have the honor to report that in obedience to your orders received through Surg Hancock I ordered my Battalion from the 1st 2d 3 & 4 Div of Jackson Hospital to the front on Saturday night at 12 o’clk and reported by order of Maj. Pegram to Col. Ship P.A.C.S. Comdg Cadet Corps.​
I have great pleasure in stating that my men acted with the utmost promptness and good will.​
I had the pleasure of turning over to Major Chambliss a portion of my Negro command to be attached to his Negro command. Allow me to state that they behaved in extraordinary commendable(?) manner. I would respectfully ask that Major Chambliss be particularly noticed for the manner which he handled that very important element to be inaugurated in our service.​
Respy your Obdt Servt​
H. C. Scott​
Surg(?) & Major Comdg​
Jackson Battln​

The newspapers reported that these men had been at the front, and they were seen on the Union side of the lines as well and reported as late as March 29.

The New York herald. (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, March 13, 1865
View attachment 292235

The Tipton advertiser. (Tipton, Cedar Co., Iowa) 1856-1962, March 16, 1865
View attachment 292236

The daily dispatch. (Richmond [Va.]) 1850-1884, March 22, 1865
View attachment 292237

The New York herald. (New York [N.Y.]) 1840-1920, April 03, 1865
View attachment 292239

View attachment 292238
Major Henry C. Scott (Surgeon)
Jackson Hospital
Richmond, VA


ScottHC.jpg

Henry & Caroline Scott

"Born in Baltimore in 1828, Henry Scott first pursued law studies and later at the age of twenty-nine earned a degree in medicine from the University of Maryland. His new profession would bring him face-to-face with history, for in July of 1859 he would be one of the surgeons who dressed John Brown’s wounds after his failed insurrection at Harper’s Ferry. Months later he would examine Brown’s body again after it had been taken down from the hanging scaffold in Charles Town. Though Maryland was a border state in the Civil War, Dr. Scott’s loyalties and those of his wife lay firmly with the Confederate side. He fought initially with the First Maryland Regiment, and in 1862 joined the First Virginia Cavalry. Having been badly injured by a horse being shot under him and falling on him, Scott spent the later years of the War in Richmond. Here he served as surgeon at various army hospitals until the fall of the Capital."
-In My Home Town, a publication of Ashland (VA) Museum, Spring 2014
http://ashlandmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/In-My-Home-Town-Spring-2014.pdf
 
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19thGeorgia

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How many men were in the two companies from Winder and Jackson hospitals?

Winder

"A company of colored troops, raised by Captain [Major] J. R. Chambliss, at Camp Winder, will parade on the Square, at 4 1/2 o'clock this afternoon. The company numbers 65 men, rank and file, and have been armed, but have not yet received their uniforms." -Richmond Enquirer, March 22, 1865

Jackson

Major H. C. Scott reported his companies would average 80 to 85 men. This is found in Chapter VI, Volume 378 of
Confederate Records (Medical Department) in the National Archives.

meddept.jpg
 

19thGeorgia

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Greensboro, NC

Richmond Dispatch, November 22, 1902-
View attachment 292050


Camp of Instruction ("Camp Stokes"), Greensboro, NC
View attachment 292051


This article appeared in several newspapers. It refers to Gen Stoneman's raid in North Carolina.
There are two versions. One includes a source.

The May 2 edition of the Nashville Dispatch is not available online.

"three hundred"
View attachment 292052


"one hundred"
View attachment 292054
Daily Confederate (Raleigh, NC), March 22, 1865-
DailyConf22mar65.jpg
 
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19thGeorgia

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Capt. George P. Ring
Montgomery, AL



OR, Series 4, Volume 3, p.1193-
View attachment 292045
1861?-

"...it was a notorious fact that the enemy were using negroes to build fortifications, drive teams, and raise food for the army. Black hands piled up the sand-bags, and raised the batteries, which drove Anderson out of Sumter. At Montgomery, the capital of the confederacy, negroes were being drilled and armed for military duty."
-William Wells Brown, The Negro in the American Rebellion, p.59

I've never heard of a black military company in Montgomery in 1861.
 

Andersonh1

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1861?-

"...it was a notorious fact that the enemy were using negroes to build fortifications, drive teams, and raise food for the army. Black hands piled up the sand-bags, and raised the batteries, which drove Anderson out of Sumter. At Montgomery, the capital of the confederacy, negroes were being drilled and armed for military duty."
-William Wells Brown, The Negro in the American Rebellion, p.59

I've never heard of a black military company in Montgomery in 1861.
I have not seen that either, but there is a mention of one in nearby Mobile in this 1863 article:

Sunbury American. (Sunbury, Pa.) 1848-1879, September 12, 1863 - "...That the Confederates armed negroes at the outset of their rebellion we have already shown. They did so in Mobile, even before the battle of Bull Run. They did so in Louisiana before one negro had been allowed to put on the uniform of the United States, and black regiments had an honorable position in their grand parade in the Autumn of '61. They did so in Tennessee, even before they had openly seceded from the Union..."
 
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19thGeorgia

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I have not seen that either, but there is a mention of one in nearby Mobile in this 1863 article:

Sunbury American. (Sunbury, Pa.) 1848-1879, September 12, 1863 - "...That the Confederates armed negroes at the outset of their rebellion we have already shown. They did so in Mobile, even before the battle of Bull Run. They did so in Louisiana before one negro had been allowed to put on the uniform of the United States, and black regiments had an honorable position in their grand parade in the Autumn of '61. They did so in Tennessee, even before they had openly seceded from the Union..."
I was wondering about the time of the report. Did the writer make a mistake? Was "drilled and armed for military duty" from 1861?...or 1865?
 


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