The Real Cause of Secession

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Gene Green

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The Democrats in Congress, dominated by Southern Democrats, wrote and passed the tariff laws in the 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s, and kept reducing rates, so that the 1857 rates were down to about 15%, a move that boosted trade so overwhelmingly that revenues actually increased, from just over $20 million in 1840 ($0.5 billion in 2016 dollars), to more than $80 million by 1856 ($1.7 billion). The South had almost no complaints but the low rates angered many Northern industrialists and factory workers, especially in Pennsylvania, who demanded protection for their growing iron industry. The Whigs were replaced by the Republican Party in 1854 and also favored high tariffs to stimulate industrial growth; it was part of the 1860 Republican platform.
significantly raising tariff rates the Morrill Tariff became possible only after the Southern Senators walked out of Congress when their states left the Union, leaving a Republican majority. It was signed by Democratic President Buchanan in early March 1861 shortly before President Lincoln took office. (Wikipedia)
 

frontrank2

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Every state that gave specific reasons included slavery and more emphasis was put on slavery than on any other reason.

Please see https://www.battlefields.org/learn/articles/reasons-secession
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the article you directed me to was referring to " Declarations of Causes " which were in addition to articles of secession. These Declarations of Causes were produced by only four states. As of now, I'm standing by my original statement but it's subject to revision if proven otherwise.
 
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Gene Green

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Hello Edited. You take this out of context. I was addressing several comments made by a Mr. Lefty. He had espoused that Southerners were willing to die for slavery. Quite the Contrary, Slavery was not the issue of the whole debacle. Please read the original exchange for clarification.
Edited. You can claim that slavery was not the issue but you should accompany it with evidence.
Besides these facts I was addressing the many falsehoods in just that one paragraph.
 

Gene Green

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The Morrill Tariff took effect a few weeks before the war began on April 12, 1861, and was not collected in the South. The CSA passed its own tariff of about 15% on most items, including many items that previously were duty-free from the North. Previously tariffs between states were prohibited. The Confederates believed that they could finance their government by tariffs. (Wikipedia)
 

thomas aagaard

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No, the point was that its entire economy depended on cotton exports backed by slave labor. This was proven once the blockade was implemented because the Confederacy's economy crashed.
Just a note, It was not the union blockade that stopped cotton export, but an unofficial CSA embargo, to try pressure the UK to support them...
 
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E_just_E

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I would recommend taking a deep breath and keeping the discussion civil, respectful, and on subject.

If you are new on this board and wonder why several posts have been deleted or edited, please read the rules of the forum and make sure that your post(s) follow them. They can be found here.

Further incivility will result in further deletions and thread-bans

Posted as a moderator.
 

JeffBrooks

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It's been a while since I read them, but IIRC, not each state mentioned slavery in their articles of secession.
The actual ordinances were simple statements that secession had taken place. Four states - South Carolina, Texas, Georgia, Mississippi - issued official declarations to specify the reasons for secession and all four of them stated clearly and unambiguously, without making any apology for the fact, that the defense of slavery was the reason for secession. As for those other states which did not issue such declarations, well, we have a basically unlimited amount of newspaper columns, pamphlets, speeches, and other documentary source material to demonstrate what the reasons for secession were.

Besides, if you bump into a group of eleven people who invite you to a party, and when you ask where the party is and four of them tell you it's at Dave's house while the other seven stand quietly, you can be pretty sure the party is at Dave's house.
 
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Joshism

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What has that got to do with child labor in ante bellum yankee sweat shops?
Child labor was normal in the 19th century and not limited to factories. It occured on slave plantations, in coal mines, and (most widespread) on farms across the country. Child labor laws did not come around until the 20th century. The eight hour work day was just becoming a thing during the ACW era and even to this day isn't completely standard.
 

WJC

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The allegation that the war was fought over slaves did not come forth until 1863 Lincoln tried to foment chaos in the South. HE NEVER FREED THE NORTHERN SLAVES.
The 'allegation" is that the primary reason for the developing regional dispute was disagreement over slavery. That is uncontested by scholars. Lincoln was President, not a dictator or absolute monarch. He was not empowered under our Constitution to 'free the slaves', since slavery was governed by the individual states. When he did act by issuing the Emancipation Proclamation he did so under his war powers: that's why it only affected slaves in territory controlled by the U. S. Army. Lincoln and others soon realized, however, that it would be both inhumane and impossible to reenslave newly freed slaves and the Thirteenth Amendment, introduced December 14, 1863, was ratified December 6, 1865.
 
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frontrank2

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The actual ordinances were simple statements that secession had taken place. Four states - South Carolina, Texas, Georgia, Mississippi - issued official declarations to specify the reasons for secession and all four of them stated clearly and unambiguously, without making any apology for the fact, that the defense of slavery was the reason for secession. As for those other states which did not issue such declarations, well, we have a basically unlimited amount of newspaper columns, pamphlets, and other documentary source material to demonstrate what the reasons for secession were.

Besides, if you bump into a group of eleven people who invite you to a party, and when you ask where the party is and four of them tell you it's at Dave's house while the other seven stand quietly, you can be pretty sure the party is at Dave's house.
I kind of agree with you, slavery was the catalyst for the ACW, but .........IMHO there were other important reasons for secession. With the implementation of the Tariff of 1828 ( AKA - The tariff of Abominations ) which levied a 38% tax on imported goods, it raised the cost significantly of virtually everything purchased in the South. For years Southerners were able to sell their cotton and tobacco to Britain and France and in return they would receive inexpensive European goods, including clothing made from it's own cotton. The furor this tariff created led to the Nullification Crisis which almost caused South Carolina to secede thirty years prior to the ACW. South Carolina's John C. Calhoun ( who was running for VP of the United States ) declared that states were under no obligation to obey Federal Tariff Law or collect the duties from ships entering their harbors. Later, South Carolina lawmakers acted upon this assertion and defied the Federal Government to overrule them or risk having the state secede. This set off the Nullification Crisis which theorized that states could nullify or ignore any Federal law that was not in it's best interest. The crisis was diffused when President Jackson sent warships to Charleston Harbor which marked the first time a Southern state had threatened to secede from the Union.
 
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frontrank2

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And the democrats in the south made sure they controlled the tariffs ever since until secession.
Perhaps, but don't you think the Tariff and the Nullification Crisis led to animosities ( on both sides ) which lingered until the start of the ACW? My point being there was a threat of secession by a Southern State years before 1861.
 

frontrank2

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Perhaps, but don't you think the Tariff and the Nullification Crisis led to animosities ( on both sides ) which lingered until the start of the ACW? My point being there was a threat of secession by a Southern State years before 1861.
And at that time, it didn't pertain to slavery.
 

Tin cup

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And at that time, it didn't pertain to slavery.
I disagree, they tried using the "tariff" issue to GET nullification on the books TO protect slavery. THAT was the reason for the Tariff of abominations crisis, engineered by Calhoun and cronies to get a nullifying law on the books so States could legally ignore anti-slavery laws.
Pres. Jackson saw thru the facade, and got those folk to back down.

Kevin Dally
 
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Gene Green

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And at that time, it didn't pertain to slavery.
The Declaration of Immediate Causes associated with South Carolina's ordinance of secession from December 1860 stated that nullification attempts by the northern states were a cause of South Carolina's secession from the union: "an increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the institution of slavery, has led to a disregard of their obligations, and the laws of the General Government have ceased to effect the objects of the Constitution. The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa, have enacted laws which either nullify the Acts of Congress or render useless any attempt to execute them. (Wikipedia)

Perhaps, but don't you think the Tariff and the Nullification Crisis led to animosities ( on both sides ) which lingered until the start of the ACW? My point being there was a threat of secession by a Southern State years before 1861.
new england or at least Massachusetts threatened secession over trade embargo’s before 1861. Yes there were animosities on both sides and always have been and continue to do so, though the divide is much more complicated as time passes and we become more homogenized. Even so the root of the nullification crisis was slavery and the south’s agrarian slave powered economy. It was their lack of interest in moving forward that left them behind in both industrialization and agriculture.
 

frontrank2

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I disagree, they tried using the "tariff" issue to GET nullification on the books TO protect slavery. THAT was the reason for the Tariff of abominations crisis, engineered by Calhoun and cronies to get a nullifying law on the books so States could legally ignore anti-slavery laws.
Pres. Jackson saw thru the facade, and got those folk to back down.

Kevin Dally
I'm not totally on board with your statement. Ignoring anti slavery laws might have been a secondary reason to get Nullification Laws on the books, but I think the main reason was economic. As I recall, the American Revolution was started over taxes that were less severe than the Tariff of 1828.
 
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