Sherman The Paradox of William T. Sherman

Georgia

Sergeant

danny

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Hattiesburg
The article 'The Paradox of William T. Sherman' attached to the OP starts out with a reference to the March to the Sea with the next sentence referencing the quote "I can make Georgia howl". The article also talks at length about Sherman's actions in Georgia and South Carolina.
My view is that there is no paradox to Sherman. I stated that in Post #2 of this thread when I also said "Sherman knew what he was doing in fighting people rather than armies and took pride in it". Sherman is what he is, there is nothing really contradictory about him.
In Posts #383 and (especially) #384 I asked for incidences and examples of things that, if documentary evidence exists, may lead to some paradox in the man. I have yet to see any source documents or period commentary in answer to those questions.

THE
SIEGE OF SAVANNAH
IN
DECEMBER, 1864,
AND THE
CONFEDERATE OPERATIONS IN GEORGIA AND
THE THIRD MILITARY DISTRICT OF SOUTH CAROLINA
DURING
GENERAL SHERMAN'S MARCH
FROM ATLANTA TO THE SEA.

BY

CHARLES C. JONES, JR.,
LATE LIEUT. COL. ARTILLERY, C. S. A., AND CHIEF OF ARTILLERY
DURING THE SIEGE.

PREFACE.

To perpetuate the Confederate memories connected with the march of General Sherman from Atlanta to Savannah is the design of the following pages. To be guided in all that he relates by the genuine circumstances of the action has been the author's care. This sad chapter in the history of Georgia has been written only by those who made light of her afflictions, laughed at her calamities, gloated over her losses, and lauded her spoilers. A predatory expedition, inaugurated with full knowledge of her weakness, conceived in a spirit of wanton destruction, conducted in violation of the rules of civilized warfare, and compassed in the face of feeble resistance, has been magnified into a grand military achievement worthy of all admiration. The easy march of a well appointed army of seventy thousand men through the heart of a state abounding in every supply save men and materials of war, and at the most delightful season of the year, has been so talked of and written about by those who either participated in the enterprise or sympathized with its leaders, that multitudes have come to regard this holiday excursion as a triumph of consummate military skill and valor--as one of the most wonderful exploits in the history of modern warfare. Audi alteram partem.
NEW YORK CITY, December 20, 1874.










Page vii

"Until we can repopulate Georgia, it is useless to occupy it: but the utter destruction of its roads, houses and people
will cripple, their military resources. By attempting to hold the roads we will lose a thousand men monthly, and will gain no result. I can make the march and make Georgia howl.
...I prefer to march through Georgia, smashing things to the sea
."

So wrote Major General Sherman, from Atlanta, to Lieutenant General Grant. That officer having sanctioned the proposed movement, and indicated a preference for Savannah as the objective point of the campaign, General Sherman, about the middle of November, 1864, put his columns in motion for their march of spoliation and devastation through the heart of Georgia. The "smashing" operation of this modern Alaric was fairly inaugurated by the wanton and merciless destruction of the cities of Atlanta and Rome.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
By the way, anyone know how the city of Atlanta is doing, now?

Whig view of History. Use the Present to determine facts of History. It is a Fallacy, similar to using a Single Solution to solve a complicated set of circumstances. Example, saying Slavery was the only Causation of the Civil War.

Not surprising some use both Fallacies.

Appreciate your Contributions.
 

Quaama

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Location
Port Macquarie, Australia
By the way, anyone know how the city of Atlanta is doing, now?

It's been over 150 years since Sherman so probably about the same as other cities. There may be some news in the Concerns About Civil War Monuments and Sites forum.

Incidentally, in Post #382 you posted the quote:
I will take infinitely more delight in curing the wounds made by war than in inflicting them."
--Sherman in a letter to Mrs. Caroline Carson, Jan. 20, 1865.

What exactly did Sherman do after the war to 'cure the wounds' and how did he "delight" in doing that?
 

Georgia

Sergeant
It's been over 150 years since Sherman so probably about the same as other cities. There may be some news in the Concerns About Civil War Monuments and Sites forum.

Incidentally, in Post #382 you posted the quote:
I will take infinitely more delight in curing the wounds made by war than in inflicting them."
--Sherman in a letter to Mrs. Caroline Carson, Jan. 20, 1865.

What exactly did Sherman do after the war to 'cure the wounds' and how did he "delight" in doing that?
@Quaama, I’m still awaiting the answers to these questions as well.
 

danny

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Hattiesburg
Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the Field near Savannah, Ga.,
December 17th, 1864. General Wm. J. Hardee,

Commanding Confederate Forces in Savannah. General

You have doubtless observed from your station at Rosedew that sea going vessels now come through Ossabaw sound and up Ogeechee to the rear of my army, giving me abundant supplies of all kinds, and more especially heavy ordnance necessary to the reduction of Savannah. I have already received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot as far as the heart of your city, also I have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison of Savannah can be supplied, and I am therefore justified in demanding the surrender of the city of Savannah and its dependent forts, and shall await a reasonable time your answer, before opening with heavy ordnance. Should you entertain the proposition, I am prepared to grant liberal terms to the inhabitants and garrison, but should I be forced to resort to assault, or the slower and surer process of starvation, I shall then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and shall make little effort to restrain my army burning to avenge the great national wrong they attach to Savannah and other large cities which have been so prominent in dragging our country into civil war. I enclose you a copy of General Hood's demand for the surrender of the town of Resacca, to be used by you for what it is worth.

I have the honor to be,
Your obedient servant,



W. T. SHERMAN,
Major General.​


To this demand General Hardee, on the 18th, returned the following response:

Headquarters Department S. C., Ga. &
Florida, Savannah, Ga., Dec. 17th, 1864. Major General W. T. Sherman,
Commanding Federal Forces, near Savannah, Ga.

General:

I have to acknowledge receipt of a communication from you, of this date, in which you demand "the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts," on the ground that you "have received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot into the heart of the city;" and for the further reason that you "have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison can be supplied." You add, that should you "be forced to resort to assault or to the slower and surer process of starvation, you will then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and will make little effort to restrain your army, etc., etc."

The position of your forces half a mile beyond the outer line for the land defense of Savannah, is, at the nearest point, at least four miles from the heart of the city. That and the interior line are both intact

Your statement that you have, for some days, held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison can be supplied, is incorrect. I am in free and constant communication with my department.

Your demand for the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts is refused.

With respect to the threats conveyed in the closing paragraph of your letter of what may be expected in case your demand is not complied with, I have to say that I have hitherto conducted the military operations entrusted to my direction in strict accordance with the rules of civilized warfare, and I should deeply regret the adoption of any course by you that may force me to deviate from them in future.
I have the honor to be,
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,



W. J. HARDEE,
Lieutenant General.​
 

Georgia

Sergeant
Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the Field near Savannah, Ga.,
December 17th, 1864. General Wm. J. Hardee,

Commanding Confederate Forces in Savannah. General

You have doubtless observed from your station at Rosedew that sea going vessels now come through Ossabaw sound and up Ogeechee to the rear of my army, giving me abundant supplies of all kinds, and more especially heavy ordnance necessary to the reduction of Savannah. I have already received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot as far as the heart of your city, also I have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison of Savannah can be supplied, and I am therefore justified in demanding the surrender of the city of Savannah and its dependent forts, and shall await a reasonable time your answer, before opening with heavy ordnance. Should you entertain the proposition, I am prepared to grant liberal terms to the inhabitants and garrison, but should I be forced to resort to assault, or the slower and surer process of starvation, I shall then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and shall make little effort to restrain my army burning to avenge the great national wrong they attach to Savannah and other large cities which have been so prominent in dragging our country into civil war. I enclose you a copy of General Hood's demand for the surrender of the town of Resacca, to be used by you for what it is worth.

I have the honor to be,
Your obedient servant,



W. T. SHERMAN,
Major General.​


To this demand General Hardee, on the 18th, returned the following response:

Headquarters Department S. C., Ga. &
Florida, Savannah, Ga., Dec. 17th, 1864. Major General W. T. Sherman,
Commanding Federal Forces, near Savannah, Ga.

General:

I have to acknowledge receipt of a communication from you, of this date, in which you demand "the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts," on the ground that you "have received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot into the heart of the city;" and for the further reason that you "have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison can be supplied." You add, that should you "be forced to resort to assault or to the slower and surer process of starvation, you will then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and will make little effort to restrain your army, etc., etc."

The position of your forces half a mile beyond the outer line for the land defense of Savannah, is, at the nearest point, at least four miles from the heart of the city. That and the interior line are both intact

Your statement that you have, for some days, held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison can be supplied, is incorrect. I am in free and constant communication with my department.

Your demand for the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts is refused.

With respect to the threats conveyed in the closing paragraph of your letter of what may be expected in case your demand is not complied with, I have to say that I have hitherto conducted the military operations entrusted to my direction in strict accordance with the rules of civilized warfare, and I should deeply regret the adoption of any course by you that may force me to deviate from them in future.
I have the honor to be,
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,



W. J. HARDEE,
Lieutenant General.​
Wow. Sounds almost like back and forth posts on the forum. :wink:
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi, in the Field near Savannah, Ga.,
December 17th, 1864. General Wm. J. Hardee,

Commanding Confederate Forces in Savannah. General

You have doubtless observed from your station at Rosedew that sea going vessels now come through Ossabaw sound and up Ogeechee to the rear of my army, giving me abundant supplies of all kinds, and more especially heavy ordnance necessary to the reduction of Savannah. I have already received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot as far as the heart of your city, also I have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison of Savannah can be supplied, and I am therefore justified in demanding the surrender of the city of Savannah and its dependent forts, and shall await a reasonable time your answer, before opening with heavy ordnance. Should you entertain the proposition, I am prepared to grant liberal terms to the inhabitants and garrison, but should I be forced to resort to assault, or the slower and surer process of starvation, I shall then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and shall make little effort to restrain my army burning to avenge the great national wrong they attach to Savannah and other large cities which have been so prominent in dragging our country into civil war. I enclose you a copy of General Hood's demand for the surrender of the town of Resacca, to be used by you for what it is worth.

I have the honor to be,
Your obedient servant,



W. T. SHERMAN,
Major General.​


To this demand General Hardee, on the 18th, returned the following response:

Headquarters Department S. C., Ga. &
Florida, Savannah, Ga., Dec. 17th, 1864. Major General W. T. Sherman,
Commanding Federal Forces, near Savannah, Ga.

General:

I have to acknowledge receipt of a communication from you, of this date, in which you demand "the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts," on the ground that you "have received guns that can cast heavy and destructive shot into the heart of the city;" and for the further reason that you "have for some days held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison can be supplied." You add, that should you "be forced to resort to assault or to the slower and surer process of starvation, you will then feel justified in resorting to the harshest measures, and will make little effort to restrain your army, etc., etc."

The position of your forces half a mile beyond the outer line for the land defense of Savannah, is, at the nearest point, at least four miles from the heart of the city. That and the interior line are both intact

Your statement that you have, for some days, held and controlled every avenue by which the people and garrison can be supplied, is incorrect. I am in free and constant communication with my department.

Your demand for the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts is refused.

With respect to the threats conveyed in the closing paragraph of your letter of what may be expected in case your demand is not complied with, I have to say that I have hitherto conducted the military operations entrusted to my direction in strict accordance with the rules of civilized warfare, and I should deeply regret the adoption of any course by you that may force me to deviate from them in future.
I have the honor to be,
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,



W. J. HARDEE,
Lieutenant General.​
And yet he basically let Hardee leave, and had a nice little stay in Savannah according to many regimental histories. Sherman expedited a relief effort from northern aid societies and fed the civilians. And many of the civilian populace was quite friendly with the union troops.
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
I will take infinitely more delight in curing the wounds made by war than in inflicting them."
--Sherman in a letter to Mrs. Caroline Carson, Jan. 20, 1865.

What exactly did Sherman do after the war to 'cure the wounds' and how did he "delight" in doing that?
I believe Sherman advocated for a more hands-off reconstruction, letting the old southern leadership back in control to do the rebuilding.
 

danny

Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Hattiesburg
And yet he basically let Hardee leave, and had a nice little stay in Savannah according to many regimental histories. Sherman expedited a relief effort from northern aid societies and fed the civilians. And many of the civilian populace was quite friendly with the union troops.
Sounds like warm and fuzzy times.
 

unionblue

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Member of the Year
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Ocala, FL (as of December, 2015).
Whig view of History. Use the Present to determine facts of History. It is a Fallacy, similar to using a Single Solution to solve a complicated set of circumstances. Example, saying Slavery was the only Causation of the Civil War.

Not surprising some use both Fallacies.

Appreciate your Contributions.
It's been over 150 years since Sherman so probably about the same as other cities. There may be some news in the Concerns About Civil War Monuments and Sites forum.

Incidentally, in Post #382 you posted the quote:
I will take infinitely more delight in curing the wounds made by war than in inflicting them."
--Sherman in a letter to Mrs. Caroline Carson, Jan. 20, 1865.

What exactly did Sherman do after the war to 'cure the wounds' and how did he "delight" in doing that?
In what way? I have family living there. (And, I’m not sure the line of thought behind your question- may I inquire why the request for information and how this adds to the Sherman paradox question posed by the OP.)

@uaskme ,

We do use the past to determine the present, do we not? We can't help doing so. As for a single factor that led to the Civil War, it was slavery, of that fact, there is little doubt.

As for the city of Atlanta today, you have no comment? I would have appreciated some new information to help me drawing some conclusions about the thread topic.

Maybe next time.

Unionblue

@Quaama ,

It's been a 150 years so the same as other cities? No more details? A bit disappointing as I was just wondering how the city is in the present.

As for the rest of your above, I have been reading Sherman's memoirs on-line and have found a few examples that might answer your question. I only ask for a bit more time so that I might learn more and give a more detailed response as you have noted, there is very little on such efforts by Sherman presented here or in other sources.

Unionblue

@Georgia ,

In the present way, as the city and all that happened to it seems to have taken on a very important aspect with many of the posters on this thread. I see that you have family residing there. Do they like the city? Do they enjoy living there? What do they like most about it?

I myself have driven through Atlanta many times on my way from Florida to my old home in Columbus, Ohio. I have stopped there only to eat a few times and have enjoyed myself. I am always impressed when I drive through downtown Atlanta with the tall buildings and many businesses I view.

I also remember having to fly through the Atlanta airport when I was in the military going from one post to another. Huge place, busy, busy, busy! Always a check of my physical fitness as I ran from one connecting flight to the other!

As for how the present state of the city bares any relation to this thread topic, "the paradox of William T. Sherman," obviously the two have a history that we in the present are trying to resolve or attach importance to the two.

Just wondering how the combination of the two, in this time, can shed any light on that supposed "paradox."

Sincerely,
Unionblue
 

Quaama

Sergeant
Joined
Sep 13, 2020
Location
Port Macquarie, Australia
@Quaama ,

It's been a 150 years so the same as other cities? [1] No more details? A bit disappointing as I was just wondering how the city is in the present.

As for the rest of your above, I have been reading Sherman's memoirs on-line and have found a few examples that might answer your question. [2] I only ask for a bit more time so that I might learn more and give a more detailed response as you have noted, there is very little on such efforts by Sherman presented here or in other sources.

Unionblue

[1] Correct, no more details. If we go down paths like that (e.g. discussing present situations) the thread is bound to go widely off-topic.

[2] No problem, that's fine with me.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
@uaskme ,

We do use the past to determine the present, do we not? We can't help doing so. As for a single factor that led to the Civil War, it was slavery, of that fact, there is little doubt.

As for the city of Atlanta today, you have no comment? I would have appreciated some new information to help me drawing some conclusions about the thread topic.

Maybe next time.

Unionblue

@Quaama ,

It's been a 150 years so the same as other cities? No more details? A bit disappointing as I was just wondering how the city is in the present.

As for the rest of your above, I have been reading Sherman's memoirs on-line and have found a few examples that might answer your question. I only ask for a bit more time so that I might learn more and give a more detailed response as you have noted, there is very little on such efforts by Sherman presented here or in other sources.

Unionblue

@Georgia ,

In the present way, as the city and all that happened to it seems to have taken on a very important aspect with many of the posters on this thread. I see that you have family residing there. Do they like the city? Do they enjoy living there? What do they like most about it?

I myself have driven through Atlanta many times on my way from Florida to my old home in Columbus, Ohio. I have stopped there only to eat a few times and have enjoyed myself. I am always impressed when I drive through downtown Atlanta with the tall buildings and many businesses I view.

I also remember having to fly through the Atlanta airport when I was in the military going from one post to another. Huge place, busy, busy, busy! Always a check of my physical fitness as I ran from one connecting flight to the other!

As for how the present state of the city bares any relation to this thread topic, "the paradox of William T. Sherman," obviously the two have a history that we in the present are trying to resolve or attach importance to the two.

Just wondering how the combination of the two, in this time, can shed any light on that supposed "paradox."

Sincerely,
Unionblue

Google, ATL. I’m sure you can find a lot of info. I suspect you have driven thru there, you are a Snowbird, aren’t ya.

It is irrelevant what ATL and what GA and the rest of the South is at present, when discussing Civil War History. The South was resilient. It persevered. The South kept its Regional Identity. Much to the dismay of the Yankee. It survived Sherman and the Yankee controlled Federal Governments Invasion. You know the same Government with Sherman that propagated a Race War with the Plains Indians.
 

DanSBHawk

Captain
Joined
May 8, 2015
Location
Wisconsin
Google, ATL. I’m sure you can find a lot of info. I suspect you have driven thru there, you are a Snowbird, aren’t ya.

It is irrelevant what ATL and what GA and the rest of the South is at present, when discussing Civil War History. The South was resilient. It persevered. The South kept its Regional Identity. Much to the dismay of the Yankee. It survived Sherman and the Yankee controlled Federal Governments Invasion. You know the same Government with Sherman that propagated a Race War with the Plains Indians.
Were there any objections from Americans in the south as to the Indian Wars?

Funny how Sherman was welcomed in Atlanta and other southern cities when he visited in 1879. Then southerners fell for the Jeff Davis and Lost Cause revisionist fairy tales, and Sherman became the devil incarnate.
 

Georgia

Sergeant
@Georgia ,

In the present way, as the city and all that happened to it seems to have taken on a very important aspect with many of the posters on this thread. I see that you have family residing there. Do they like the city? Do they enjoy living there? What do they like most about it?

I myself have driven through Atlanta many times on my way from Florida to my old home in Columbus, Ohio. I have stopped there only to eat a few times and have enjoyed myself. I am always impressed when I drive through downtown Atlanta with the tall buildings and many businesses I view.

I also remember having to fly through the Atlanta airport when I was in the military going from one post to another. Huge place, busy, busy, busy! Always a check of my physical fitness as I ran from one connecting flight to the other!

As for how the present state of the city bares any relation to this thread topic, "the paradox of William T. Sherman," obviously the two have a history that we in the present are trying to resolve or attach importance to the two.

Just wondering how the combination of the two, in this time, can shed any light on that supposed "paradox."

Sincerely,
Unionblue
I’ll do my best to answer in the order of your questions.
My cousin and his wife live in an area near old five points called “Cabbagetown” in a restored home. He’s a retired professor from GSU. They love it there. It’s a very walkable area of the city. Lots of local pubs and restaurants- he’s quite fond of the Vortex. Their area is known for lovely gardens and they volunteer with neighborhood home tours etc.

His parents lived in College Park which is south of the main part of Atlanta near Jonesborogh. Their home was near Woodward Academy where my cousin’s attended school. My Aunt taught first grade in Clayton County for over forty years and my Uncle drive into town as he was an attorney. There are a fair number of pilots who live in this area due to the proximity of the airports. And, there are doctors who have a home there during the school year so their children are near campus and then another north of the city for the summers.

Since you literally do drive through town when you go through Atlanta, my hopes are that you were able to eat at the Varsity near Georgia Tech ( best onion rings around and fried peach pies and a creamsicle milkshake called the frosted orange) or you got off on Piedmont Avenue and went to Fat Matt’s Rib Shack and enjoyed the live music, q and rum baked beans.

The Atlanta Airport is huge. And, once you travel in and out a few times, you have it down to a science as long as they don’t change your fate and you have to make a mad dash to the new listing. The “Plane Train” makes getting to your location much easier.

Atlanta is a huge metropolitan area with both good and bad areas and good and bad people. I don’t want to make it sound like it’s all butterflies and rainbows. If you stay in town, try not to stay near Grady Hospital as the gun shot and stabbing victims will be coming in on ambulances throughout the night.
And, this may be misguided, but I’m comfortable taking MARTA by myself in to town when I was going in to the Mart for trade shows or needing to get myself to the airport.
There are loses in Atlanta as Rich’s is no more. Twice a year, if you were lucky, you went to Rich’s Department Store. Usually it would be for back to school clothes and to see Santa.
Rich’s was the most magical locations during Christmas. You went to get the all important photo with Santa for your parent’s Christmas cards. So, you rode being very cautious that your dress and bow and hair would not be mussed for the photo. After seeing Santa, you rode the Pink Pig. The pink pig was a pig shaped tube suspended on the ceiling of the toy department. The first car had the ears and the snout and the last car had a curled spring tail with a red bow on it. The ride took you all around the toy department to see all the offerings of the store and then you went outside and around the great tree on the top of the building.( The tree was Lit to great fanfare right after Thanksgiving.) Once you rode the pink pig and got your sticker saying you had been given that privilege you went to the Magnolia Room for lunch. It was a sunken dining room surrounded on one side by the most incredible book department I’d ever seen. Then, a little holiday window shopping would be done and you’d leave by going by the bakery and confectionary counters. Momma would select a caramel bar cake covered in a boiled icing that tasted like a creamy praline. It would be placed in a green and white latticed box and tied with string for the drive home. Then, if you had been good, you could select a small sack of candies to take home. This is where I was first introduced to Swedish fish and the raspberries with nonpareils and the sour cherries with the harder wax like outer covering and the gummy inside. And, you drove back home to Athens listening to your Momma backseat drive and complain to Daddy that she can’t understand where all these cars could’ve come from and things certainly have changed since they lived on Delia Drive when Daddy worked at the CDC.
So, like most places, there are fun memories of Atlanta and then they’re mixed in with the time Momna and Daddy has gone to Underground Atlanta for dinner out and Daddy had to pull her into a doorway to get her out of gunfire. ( they never went to Underground Atlanta ever again after that.)

There are very poverty stricken areas and very exclusive areas. There a wonderful schools and very poorly funded schools. But, there’s history there and the State House has a done covered in Gold from Dahlonega, GA where the first gold rush happens near the start of the Appalachian Trail, the High Museum, the Carter Center, Fernbank Science Center, Cyclorama, The Dump aka Margaret Mitchell House,The Coca-Cola Myseum, the Aquarium, ball teams, etc. I’m leaving tons out- but, yes, it’s an amazing place.

But, it’s all new construction, post Sherman’s bonfire. It’s not good manners to bring up Sherman. And, there’s still talk in hushed tones about families who lost everything in the war. And, you know exactly which war they’re talking about. People, the older ones, still call it the “War of Northern Aggression.” But, generations are being lost to time and its not as likely to be discussed because the people aren’t there who actually had their family members talk about it. So, it’s being lost to time.
But, south of town, there a huge location called Stone Mountain. With all the CSA monuments being removed I’m not sure what they’ll do with it. It’s a bas relief sculpture that’s 76’ by 158’ of Jefferson Davis on Blackjack, Robert E.Lee on Traveler and Stonewall Jackson on Little Sorrel. And, it’s a new creation- and one with extremely negative roots.

So, there’s a good bit of negativity still there. And, it’s not all directed to Sherman.
I still don’t know if any of these ramblings even touch on what you were shooting for in reference to Sherman. And, if you can further explain what it is you are trying to get me to explain to you- I’ll gladly do my best. But, this is Atlanta to me. It’s Celestine Sibley and Lewis Grizzard and Rich’s mixed in with a little gold from Dahlonega on the State House dome, some pot likker and cornbread, and it’s home.
 
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