Counterpoint The Most Terrifying Death in the War

Virginia Dave

First Sergeant
Forum Host
Joined
Jan 3, 2019
Location
Waynesboro, Virginia
Whether atrocities of fearful tragedy and revenge or plain facing the rebel charge, which death do you determine to be the most terror stricken moment?
Keeping with the era of our discussion and topic, as a hint to E. A. Poe who once wrote The Pit and the Pendulum, I prefer one at a time. Mine is;

"There were reports taken upon the field after the First Bull Run when wounded soldiers lay upon the ground that spoke of wild hogs feeding upon the living before they were dead."

Lubliner.
Burning to death due to fire started during battle. Seeing the flames coming towards you and not being able to retreat or have a weapon to end your misery.
 

Polloco

Captain
Joined
Sep 15, 2018
Location
South Texas
Who was it, Gordon, who said he'd have drowned in his own blood if his hat didn't have bullet holes? That would not be pleasant. But I can imagine just about receiving any major wound and the doctor telling you "There's nothing else I can do for you , Son" would play on your mind while you're conscious.
 
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farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
Well, I’ve got a fairly horrid way to go. Here’s one of my folks, who was shot in the 22 July Battle of Alabama.
His brother was shot with him in the bowels and lived six hours. John lived a week.
89FF1D28-F961-4D4D-8797-00492ADB7997.jpeg

I guess maybe amputation would be a moot point...
 

Lubliner

1st Lieutenant
Forum Host
Joined
Nov 27, 2018
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Well, I’ve got a fairly horrid way to go. Here’s one of my folks, who was shot in the 22 July Battle of Alabama.
His brother was shot with him in the bowels and lived six hours. John lived a week.
View attachment 379189
I guess maybe amputation would be a moot point...
This gives me cause to remember both Jeb Stuart being shot in the kidney area and Stonewall trying to cope with his week of deterioration. Not only these men but many that were knowledgeable of approaching death were heroic in how they faced it.
Lubliner.
 

Biscoitos

Corporal
Joined
May 14, 2020
Whether atrocities of fearful tragedy and revenge or plain facing the rebel charge, which death do you determine to be the most terror stricken moment?
Keeping with the era of our discussion and topic, as a hint to E. A. Poe who once wrote The Pit and the Pendulum, I prefer one at a time. Mine is;

"There were reports taken upon the field after the First Bull Run when wounded soldiers lay upon the ground that spoke of wild hogs feeding upon the living before they were dead."

Lubliner.
At Vicksburg a man was killed by a 220 lb. 13 inch mortar shell which struck him squarely from above and drove his head, torso and legs deeply into the ground. His hands and maybe feet were all that was left on the surface.
Terrifying to everyone else, including us, but he probably "never knew what hit him," unless he looked up.

I may be wrong about the source, but I believe that he was a member of the 3rd Louisiana Inf. or it was recorded in the records of that unit.

Do any of you Vicksburg guys have the source?
 

farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
This gives me cause to remember both Jeb Stuart being shot in the kidney area and Stonewall trying to cope with his week of deterioration. Not only these men but many that were knowledgeable of approaching death were heroic in how they faced it.
Lubliner.
Absolutely. I posted John’s brother, George Morgan Rikard’s death in the Death Notifications thread of Tom Elmore . He was at peace while he waited six hours for death to come, after being shot in the bowels....
 

Nathanb1

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Forum Host
Retired Moderator
Joined
Dec 31, 2009
Location
Smack dab in the heart of Texas
This gives me cause to remember both Jeb Stuart being shot in the kidney area and Stonewall trying to cope with his week of deterioration. Not only these men but many that were knowledgeable of approaching death were heroic in how they faced it.
Lubliner.

I thought about Stuart when I was being hauled 75 miles in an ambulance because of a ruptured hernia...and the medic wouldn't give me anything for the pain (there couldn't have been any shocks on that thing!). Every time I hit a bump, I thought about him in that horse-drawn ambulance over those rough roads. :nah disagree:
 
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