The Mine Creek Battlefield (Pleasanton, Kansas)

Buckeye Bill

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The Battle of Mine Creek was fought on October 25, 1864 in Pleasanton, Kansas. This American Civil War battle was part of Confederate Major General Sterling Price's Missouri Expedition. Price began an expedition in September of 1864 to restore Confederate control of Missouri. After being defeated at the Battle of Westport, Missouri on October 23, Price's army began to retreat south through the state of Kansas. Early on October 25, Price's army was defeated at the Battle of Marais des Cygnes. After Marais des Cygnes, the Confederates fell back, but were stalled at the crossing of Mine Creek while a wagon train attempted to cross. This battle was one of the largest cavalry engagements of the war. The Mine Creek Battlefield is a well preserved venue with a visitor center, interpretive markers and 3 trails (Prairie, Creek and Nature).

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limberbox

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Thanks very much for posting. My ancestor enlisted in the Third Iowa Cavalry at age 55 in 1861. The Third along with the Fourth Iowa were the two regiments in Winslow's Brigade (under Maj. Benteen at the time, due to Winslow's wounding) who attacked after their brigade-mates in the 10th Missouri stalled, and precipitated the route. Two Third Iowa troopers, Pvt. James Dunlavy and Sgt. Calvary Young, each separately captured a Rebel general in the battle -- Dunlavy capturing Marmaduke and Young capturing Cabell.

Winslow's memoir is excellent and insightful: The Story of a Cavalryman. (recently discovered and published in 2016; all sale proceeds benefit the Monett Battle of Westport Fund)

Wm. Forse Scott's well known The Story of a Cavalry Regiment (1893), by the former adjutant of the Fourth Iowa, is also very good.

A self-published modern history of the Third Iowa: Cavalrymen of the Third Iowa (2014) by David G. Hunter, is surprisingly good too, especially for the 1863-65 period.

I have never been to Mine Creek but look forward to visiting. In the meantime, thank you again for posting the photos of this under-appreciated battle.
 

Buckeye Bill

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Mine Creek is one battlefield I would like to visit. It is not a huge distance from me, but far enough. Fort Scott is not a long ways off, nor is Baxter Springs. Thanks for the photo tour and the information @Buckeye Bill.

The Mine Creek Battlefield, along with the Honey Springs Battlefield, just jumped into my Top 10 favorite American Civil War sites. I started Monday touring the Honey Springs Battlefield, then Baxter Springs, then Fort Scott and finally the Mine Creek Battlefield.

* The Honey Springs Battlefield.

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* The Baxter Springs Battlefield (Massacre).

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* The Fort Scott National Historic Site.

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* The Mine Creek Battlefield.

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mofederal

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An ancestor of mine William H. Morse, a member of Co. D., 17th Illinois Cavalry fought at Mine Creek. He was originally stationed at Macon City, Mo., about 20 miles from where I lived in North Central Missouri. They chased guerrillas based out of Macon City. He was from Clinton, Illinois.
 

Buckeye Bill

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When I visited Mine Creek, it was a cold, windy November day, and we had the place entirely to ourselves. It's kind of spooky back there in the woods where the creek passes through the battlefield.

I was the only human being roaming this Hallowed Ground. As I was walking the Creek Trail, I thought the same as you, Eric. An extremely spooky trail all along the Mine Creek. And to top it off, I walked into a bunch of spider webs. Yuck!!!

Bill
 

Patrick H

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Mar 7, 2014
I'm glad to see the monument to the unknown Confederate dead. I meant to comment on it earlier. It's a beautifully written memorial that makes no excuses but simply honors their sacrifice. Those boys had seen a LOT on this campaign by the time they finally got to Mine Creek. I was also glad to see Price's Missouri Battle Flag displayed on the monument. I think it's a beautiful flag design. To me it represents the independent state that I love, much more than the Confederacy for which some of its citizens fought and died.
 

Buckeye Bill

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I'm glad to see the monument to the unknown Confederate dead. I meant to comment on it earlier. It's a beautifully written memorial that makes no excuses but simply honors their sacrifice. Those boys had seen a LOT on this campaign by the time they finally got to Mine Creek. I was also glad to see Price's Missouri Battle Flag displayed on the monument. I think it's a beautiful flag design. To me it represents the independent state that I love, much more than the Confederacy for which some of its citizens fought and died.

There is a ton of American Civil War history in the states of Missouri and Kansas. And to top it off, the Pre-American Civil War history is the foundation to this war (Bleeding Kansas to the Raid of Harper's Ferry, Virginia.

Bill
 

Patrick H

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Mar 7, 2014
There is a ton of American Civil War history in the states of Missouri and Kansas. And to top it off, the Pre-American Civil War history is the foundation to this war (Bleeding Kansas to the Raid of Harper's Ferry, Virginia.

Bill
Absolutely correct. Boonville factors into a lot of it, too, from contributing border ruffians in the bleeding Kansas years, through the start of the war in Missouri, to Price's infamous meeting with Bill Anderson during his ill fated invasion.
 
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