1. Welcome to the CivilWarTalk, a forum for questions and discussions about the American Civil War! Become a member today for full access to all of our resources, it's fast, simple, and absolutely free!
Dismiss Notice
Join and Become a Patron at CivilWarTalk!
Support this site with a monthly or yearly subscription! Active Patrons get to browse the site Ad free!
START BY JOINING NOW!

the Manship house in Jackson, Mississippi

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by RobertP, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    Located on Fortification St. in Jackson, Mississippi, very near Baptist Hospital where I was born, is the locally well known Manship house, now a State Landmark and museum. It is one of the few structures in the city that survived the War and its history is worth recounting here.

    Current view of the house restored to its 1880s appearance.
    ManshipHouseMuseum.jpg

    circa 1888
    manship-house-historical-2014.jpg

    From the Mississippi Dept. Archives and History:

    "Charles Henry Manship, Civil War mayor of Jackson, was born in Maryland, where he apprenticed to a chairmaker and trained as an ornamental painter. Attracted to Jackson in the 1830s by its building boom, he advertised his services as a painter and found work on the construction of the State House, now known as the Old Capitol. Soon he opened a shop of his own, where he sold paints and fine wallpaper.

    Charles Manship started as a city clerk, then postmaster, and he sat on the board of local charitable organizations. As mayor, Manship surrendered the town of Jackson to General William Sherman on July 16, 1863. His house served briefly as the headquarters of Confederate General John S. Adams. A small cottage constructed by Manship’s grandson in 1923 has been restored for use as the Visitor’s Center.

    During Manship’s long career as an ornamental painter, he also held several public offices; in 1857, at the age of 45, he built his Gothic Revival “cottage villa,” a home in striking contrast to the Greek Revival mansions for which the South was famed.

    The unpretentious but commodious house was built to accommodate Charles and Adaline Daley Manship’s large family of 15 children. Ten of those children lived to celebrate their parents’ golden wedding anniversary at the Manship House in 1888. (shown on the porch in the 1888 photo).

    The Manship House was built on a four-acre lot in a sparsely settled area of Jackson when it was a city of about 3,000. Although the city has grown up around the house, it stands in its original setting of native trees and shrubs, some of which may have been planted by Manship himself."
    _________________________

    When the war came to the City of Jackson, Charles Manship was the Mayor, and the Confederate defense works on the north side of town ran across his property (hence the name of Fortification Street, a very well known street when I was living there).

    1863 map of the defenses at Jackson, I have circled what I think is the Manship house in yellow, the north-south road is labeled "Canton Road", this is now the location of North State Street.

    Jacksonsiege1863.jpg


    More to follow . . .
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017

  2. (Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
  3. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    Mayor Charles Manship's oldest son, C.H. Manship, Jr., at 18 enlisted in the 10th Mississippi Infantry in the Spring of 1861. The 10th was in the thick of it from Shiloh to the Carolina's Campaign and he appears on the roll of prisoners paroled in Jackson, Miss., in July 1865 so apparently he served the entire war.

    It was Mayor Manship's duty to surrender the city when it was captured in May 1863 as part of the Vicksburg Campaign. During the occupation, according to a piece written in the Jackson Clarion Ledger many years later, the home was occupied by Federal troops:

    "Memories of war days in the Manship home linger in the stories told and retold by the grandchildren How Aunt Addie, just a girl discovered a fire started in the corner of the dining room by Federal soldiers after they had overturned a barrel of molasses and smashed all the china and how she begged them to put the fire out How Mrs. Manship tied the silver on a rope around her waist and concealed it beneath her voluminous skirt; and how she in the dark of night directed some of the negroes to remove the wheels from a cart and hide them in a pond until they needed the cart for escape. That time came, too, wen the infamous 'Billy Wilson crew,' following the army, pursued their own brand of deviltry until it was necessary for Mrs Manship and the children to leave and seek shelter in the swamp Until tat time, with officers billeted in the house the mother and her children had felt safe explained perhaps by Mrs Manship's own statement that she was a Yankee, herself, and that 'it took a Yankee to get ahead of those dam yankees!"
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
  4. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    What a remarkable family they became. One grandson, Charles P. Manship moved to Baton Rouge and in 1909 got into the newspaper business by purchasing the State Times and later the Morning Advocate. The family prospered in the media industry, owning WBRZ and local radio stations, etc. Their name is now affixed to LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication.

    But perhaps the most surprising legacy is another grandson, the child of Charles H. Manship, Jr., that young Confederate soldier of the 10th Mississippi. You see, after the war Charles moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, married and had three children. One of them, Paul Manship, became a famous sculptor in the Art Deco style both here and abroad. His most recognizable work to most of us is the golden one we see in the news in New York City every Christmas.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
  5. Rank and File

    Rank and File Private

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2015
    Messages:
    185
    Location:
    California
    What a great story. Thanks for sharing
     
    RobertP and Eleanor Rose like this.
  6. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2013
    Messages:
    10,313
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Great thread @RobertP, it's been years since I've been in the Manship House.

    As a native Jacksonian, I will always have fond childhood memories of my Dad making a point to tell whomever was in the car when we drove by the house, "That's one of the few structures that survived the War Between the States".

    What many don't realize . . . up the road in Madison County . . . the rectory of the Chapel of the Cross is a virtual twin of the Manship House. Both were designed by A.J. Downing. The rectory was built seven years earlier during 1850.

    House1.JPG
    (old) Rectory of Chapel of the Cross [Mann-Dewees House] Madison County, Mississippi. Built 1850. A.J. Downing, designer.
    https://misspreservation.com/2016/09/21/a-j-downing-exhibit-now-available-online/
     
  7. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    32,956
    Location:
    Smack dab in the heart of Texas
    Well, that shoots down my plan to go straight to Gettysburg next fall. Back through Jackson!
     
    RobertP likes this.
  8. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2013
    Messages:
    10,313
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Well . . . and I really hate to say this about my hometown . . . the Manship House is not in the safest part of the city.

    And in all honesty, you actually need a 4WD off road vehicle just to get through the streets of Jackson. Pot holes, sink holes, constant water main breaks & such.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2017
  9. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    32,956
    Location:
    Smack dab in the heart of Texas
    Yeah, we noticed the last time....when Neal made an unintentional turn off the highway. Thank goodness it was daylight.
     
  10. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2013
    Messages:
    10,313
    Location:
    Mississippi
    I'll give Mayor Manship credit, he was always looking out for his citizens.

    Here's a response from General Sherman to Mayor Manship's request for help after Vicksburg had been captured:
    20170318_221116-2.jpg
    http://www.mdah.ms.gov/new/

    My best Transciption so far:

    Headquarters 15th Army Corps
    Jackson, Mississippi
    July 21, 1863

    C.H. Manship, Esq.
    Mayor of Jackson

    Sir:

    Yours of July 20 is received.

    I will cause 200 barrels of flour and 100 barrels of mess pork to be delivered at Black River bridge to the order of any Committee you may accredit who will undertake to distribute the same to the people in want living in and near Jackson.

    Let the Committee be appointed at once and I will furnish them a safe conduct to and from the river.

    I am

    W.T. Sherman
    Major General Commnding
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  11. Nathanb1

    Nathanb1 Brev. Brig. Gen'l Forum Host Retired Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    32,956
    Location:
    Smack dab in the heart of Texas
    Gee. That nasty old Sherman. Who'd have thought? :smile:
     
  12. 7th Mississippi Infantry

    7th Mississippi Infantry Lt. Colonel Forum Host

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2013
    Messages:
    10,313
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Yeah . . . kinda of like our man Forrest's current reputation.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
    Nathanb1 and RobertP like this.
  13. 1stMS-Arty

    1stMS-Arty Corporal

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2013
    Messages:
    446
    I will be seeking that out on my next Mississippi trip.
     
    RobertP likes this.
  14. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    That's very interesting, I've seen the Chapel of the Cross but unaware of the Rectory. From the same MDAH write up here's what they say about the A.J. Downing design. It was a plan seen in a pattern book.

    "One of the few examples of Gothic-Revival residential architecture in Mississippi, the Manship House was inspired by a design in A.J. Downing’s Architecture of Country Houses, a popular 19th-century pattern book in which an almost identical house is pictured. Manship adapted the plan to a southern climate by adding floor-to-ceiling windows and a central hall for ventilation.

    [​IMG]
    A.J. Downing’s original design from Architecture of Country Houses

    The house is painted its original olive drab and cream colors, discovered under many coats of paint, and the original shingled roof has been authentically reproduced. Inside are a parlor, a sitting room, a dining room, three bedrooms, and—a convenience unusual to the region—a bathing room.

    Abundant examples to Charles Henry Manship’s decorative painting and wood graining survive in the house and have been restored by a master craftsman. The dining room appears to be paneled in oak, an effect Manship achieved by graining from floor to ceiling. Original wallpaper patterns, hidden under 20th-century wallpaper and paint layers, were carefully reproduced and hung. Some of the furniture and objects are original to the house. The rest of the furnishings are representative of a middle-class southern home in 1888, the year to which the house has been restored."
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
  15. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    From the MDAH piece here is a photo of Mayor and Mrs. Manship's children. Chas. Jr., the lad in the 10th Miss. and father of the sculptor Paul is standing at left. Probably post-War but not by much. He was 18 when he enlisted, looks a little older here.

    IMG_1820.JPG
     
  16. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    As mentioned before Paul Manship was primarily known as an Art Deco style sculptor. But he also did the "Brothers in Arms" piece at the Memorial building in the Sicily-Rome American Cemetary in Italy honoring the heroes of that campaign.
    IMG_1819.JPG

    ** Can't find a pic but he also created the Soldier's Monument at the St. Mihiel Cemetary, Verdun, France.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017
    Nathanb1 and Eleanor Rose like this.
  17. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    True, I drove through there several years ago and couldn't believe the condition of the city. What a shame, it used to be extremely clean and well run. That area along N. State from Fondren to downtown was so pretty and perfectly safe.
     
  18. Eleanor Rose

    Eleanor Rose First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2016
    Messages:
    1,013
    Location:
    central NC
    Yikes! We fly into Jackson when we visit the Vicksburg and Natchez area. We always enjoy renting a car and driving the Natchez Trace. We are planning to spend the night (just one) in Jackson on a trip next month. It will be our first trip back to Jackson in several years. We are planning to stay at the Old Capitol Inn and visit the old and new capitols before we depart for Vicksburg and Natchez. I was also hoping to visit Mynelle Gardens (4736 Clinton Blvd). Should I be concerned?
     
    alan polk likes this.
  19. RobertP

    RobertP Major

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2009
    Messages:
    7,572
    Location:
    on the long winding road
    On my visit through there a few years ago I came down N. State St. toward downtown intending to drive down Capitol St. for old times sake. The streets happened to be blocked off for a St. Patrick Day parade so I wound around to W. Capitol, other side of the I.C. RR, and headed out to Clinton and I-20. Was running low on gas and stopped at a station very close to Mynelle Gardens. Frankly the crowd there scared the **** out of me and I decided to nurse the car on down the road to the interstate. Just a heads up.
     
    Eleanor Rose and alan polk like this.
  20. alan polk

    alan polk First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,193
    I would suggest you not try Mynelle Gardens. As 7 Mississippi painfully admitted, there are places that are simply not safe in Jackson, and I hate to say Mynell Gardens is one.

    May I suggest that you try the Mississippi Agricultural Museum in Jackson. It has recreated an old town on its grounds and a very neat museum full of history stuff.

    Oh! And a rose garden!

    https://www.msagmuseum.org/
     
    Eleanor Rose likes this.
  21. Eleanor Rose

    Eleanor Rose First Sergeant

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2016
    Messages:
    1,013
    Location:
    central NC
    You had me at rose garden! :happy: We will definitely give it a try instead of Mynelle Gardens. Thank you so much!
     
    Nathanb1 and alan polk like this.

(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)
Loading...

Share This Page


(Membership has it privileges! To remove this ad: Register NOW!)