Restricted The Lost Cause IS History!

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And it accurately describes what the war was really about. The Confederacy's fight was a noble one against overwhelming odds.... a second American revolution where southerners were fighting for their rights and freedom against an oppressive federal government. If only Gettysburg had turned out differently. Who knows... What if.... :frown: I would've proudly fought in the Army of Northern Virginia! Not all soldiers get to fight for a just cause they truly believe in.
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CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
And it accurately describes what the war was really about. The Confederacy's fight was a noble one against overwhelming odds.... a second American revolution where southerners were fighting for their rights and freedom against an oppressive federal government. If only Gettysburg had turned out differently. Who knows... What if.... :frown: I would've proudly fought in the Army of Northern Virginia! Not all soldiers get to fight for a just cause they truly believe in.
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Thanks for posting truly inspirational.
 

uaskme

2nd Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 9, 2016
Location
SE Tennessee
Civil War was just like the Revolutionary War. Both the North and the South wanted what the other side wanted. Nationalism, all the Land and Wealth they could control.

Revolutionary War was about the Patriots wanting the land West of the Appalachians and the Fur Trade. Yankee merchants wanted to compete against the English. Oh, that wasn’t it. They told you it was the Tea and Taxes. Chinese Tea, that is. Biggest similarity between the Civil War and the Revolutionary War. Most of it is Myth!
 
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GwilymT

Brigadier General
Moderator
Joined
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Location
Pittsburgh
Denying slavery’s centrality in the conflict may help us to justify our ancestor worship or allow us to celebrate a mythical heritage without coming to terms with the dark truth of our history and the sins of our fathers. Denying slavery’s centrality allows us to look back at a whitewashed history of gallant heroes with rose colored glasses, stepping into the shoes of those mythical heroes Faulkner so ably wrote of... However, it’s bad history and divorces us from the truth. While it may be comforting, it serves no purpose other than self delusion. Welcome to CWT.
 
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Rhea Cole

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
In a letter to Samuel Chapman in June 1907, John S. Mosby on the Lost Cause:

"Now while I think as badly of slavery as Horace Greeley did I am not ashamed that my family were slaveholders. It was our inheritance. Neither am I ashamed that my ancestors were pirates & cattle thieves. People must be judged by the standard of their own age. If it was right to own slaves as property it was right to fight for it."

"The South went to war on account of slavery. South Carolina went to war, as she said in her secession proclamation, because slavery would not be secure under Lincoln. South Carolina ought to know what was the cause for her seceding. The truth is the modern Virgingians [Jubal Early/Southern Historical Society et al] departed from the teachings of the Father's."


The South Carolina statement that Mosby refers to:

"Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery--the greatest material interest of the world. Its labor supplies the product [cotton] which constitutes by far the largest & most important portion of commerce of the earth. These products are peculiar to the climate verging on the tropical regions, & by an impervious law of nature, none but the black race can bear exposure to the tropical sun. These products have become necessities of the world, & a blow at slavery is a blow at commerce & civilization. That blow has been long aimed at the institution [slavery] & was at the point of reaching its consumption. There was no choice left us but submission to the mandates of abolition, or a dissolution of the Union, whose principles had been subverted to work our ruin.."

The Lost Cause is history, it is the history of a disinformation campaign intended to obscure the real reason the Southern states seceded.
 
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BuckeyeWarrior

Private
Joined
Jan 1, 2020
Location
Ohio
And it accurately describes what the war was really about. The Confederacy's fight was a noble one against overwhelming odds.... a second American revolution where southerners were fighting for their rights and freedom against an oppressive federal government. If only Gettysburg had turned out differently. Who knows... What if.... :frown: I would've proudly fought in the Army of Northern Virginia! Not all soldiers get to fight for a just cause they truly believe in.
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It’s noble if you thinking fighting for slavery and an ideology that was the opposite of what the founding fathers fought for is noble.

Isham Harris, Governor of Tennessee, January 7, 1861, (Messages of the Governors of Tennessee, p. 255); "The systematic, wanton, and long continued agitation of the slavery question, with the actual and threatened aggressions of the Northern States and a portion of their people, upon the well-defined constitutional rights of the Southern citizens; the rapid growth and increase, in all the elements of power, of a purely sectional party,...“

Henry M. Rector, Governor of Arkansas, March 2, 1861, Arkansas Secession Convention, p. 44 "The area of slavery must be extended correlative with its antagonism, or it will be put speedily in the 'course of ultimate extinction.'....The extension of slavery is the vital point of the whole controversy between the North and the South...Amendments to the federal constitution are urged by some as a panacea for all the ills that beset us. That instrument is amply sufficient as it now stands, for the protection of Southern rights, if it was only enforced. The South wants practical evidence of good faith from the North, not mere paper agreements and compromises. They believe slavery a sin, we do not, and there lies the trouble."

S. C. Posey, Lauderdale County, Alabama, speaking to the Alabama Secession Convention on Jan. 25, 1861: "Mr. President, the fierce strife we have had with the Northern States, which has led to the disruption of the Government, is a trumpet-tongued answer to this question. They have declared, by the election of Lincoln, “There shall be no more slave territory–no more slave States.” To this the Cotton States have responded by acts of secession and a Southern Confederacy; which is but a solemn declaration of these States, that they will not submit to the Northern idea of restricting slavery to its present limits, and confining it to the slave States."
John Tyler Morgan, Dallas County, Alabama; also speaking to the Alabama Secession Convention on January 25, 1861: "The Ordinance of Secession rests, in a great measure, upon our assertion of a right to enslave the African race, or, what amounts to the same thing, to hold them in slavery."
“To remain in this Black Republican Union. . . (North Carolina’s) position must be one of degradation and bankruptcy. . . .I have but a few years left to me, but so help me God, they shall be spent in the cause of the rights of the whole South.”

Weldon Edwards North Carolina secession convention


"My own convictions as to negro slavery are strong. It has its evils and abuses...We recognize the negro as God and God's Book and God's Laws, in nature, tell us to recognize him - our inferior, fitted expressly for servitude...You cannot transform the negro into anything one-tenth as useful or as good as what slavery enables them to be."
~Davis
 
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BillH

Private
Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Location
SW Idaho
Not all the slave states seceded. Not all the states that seceded said that slavery was the reason. Some of the states didn't secede until Lincoln made a call (without congress) for an army to "quell" the rebellion. Nobody talks much about the slavery that was still present in the Union. Or the overt racism in the North and the northwest. Or the views of the president, which today would get him booted off most college campuses. Or the decades long struggles between those with Hamiltonian views vs those with Jeffersonian views of the proper form the government should take (i.e. how much power in the central government).

It's hard for so many folks to discuss this stuff without getting all wound up and angry. Slavery. Union. Lost Cause. Noble Cause. "of the people, by the people, for the people" Yeah, not so much...
 

Rhea Cole

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
And it accurately describes what the war was really about. The Confederacy's fight was a noble one against overwhelming odds.... a second American revolution where southerners were fighting for their rights and freedom against an oppressive federal government. If only Gettysburg had turned out differently. Who knows... What if.... :frown: I would've proudly fought in the Army of Northern Virginia! Not all soldiers get to fight for a just cause they truly believe in.
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A little context is needed. This statement by Davis was intended for the ears of the British & French public who were overwhelmingly anti-slaveholding. It was in no way meant for Southern people for the simple reason that they knew what the truth was. No better statement of the beliefs upon which the Confederacy was founded is set out by Alexander Stephens, in his Corner-Stone speech at Savannah GA March 21,1861.

"The new [Confederate] constitution has put at rest, forever, all the agitating questions relating to our peculiar institution African slavery as it exists amongst us the proper status of the negro in our form of civilization. This is the immediate cause of the late rupture & the present revolution."

[The Confederate government] "its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior white race is his natural & normal condition. This, our new government, is the fires, in the history of the world based upon the great physical, philosophical & moral truth."
 
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Rhea Cole

First Sergeant
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Location
Murfreesboro, Tennessee
Not all the slave states seceded. Not all the states that seceded said that slavery was the reason. Some of the states didn't secede until Lincoln made a call (without congress) for an army to "quell" the rebellion. Nobody talks much about the slavery that was still present in the Union. Or the overt racism in the North and the northwest. Or the views of the president, which today would get him booted off most college campuses. Or the decades long struggles between those with Hamiltonian views vs those with Jeffersonian views of the proper form the government should take (i.e. how much power in the central government).

It's hard for so many folks to discuss this stuff without getting all wound up and angry. Slavery. Union. Lost Cause. Noble Cause. "of the people, by the people, for the people" Yeah, not so much...
You are incorrect the only reason any state seceded was to prevent abolition & "preserve slaveholding for a thousand years". Every single state that seceded published a statement of causes for secession. By word count, done by the Pew Research Center, 70% of the statements involved slavery, slaveholding & giving the prevention of abolition as the reason for seceding. It would be a very good idea for you to read 1860-1 statements given by the seceding states as their reasons. Apostles of Disunion, Southern Secession Commissioners & the Causes of the Civil War by Charles Dew is made up almost entirely of the text of speeches given by the Secession Commissioners to encourage states like Virginia to secede. Georgia commissioner Henry L. Benning (the fort is named after him) made the position of the state of Georgia crystal clear. He began his remarks with a rhetorical question:


"What was the reason that induced Georgia to take the step of secession?"

"This reason may be summed up in a single proposition. It was the conviction, a deep conviction on the part of Georgia, that a separation from the North was the only thing that could prevent abolition of her slavery."


It is beautiful when somebody tells the truth in such a crystal clear fashion. Fortunately, the decades long attempt of the Southern Historical Society & the like that obscure Benning's jewel of frankness with the Lost Cause disinformation tropes that often appear in threads like this one has been blown away. Truth will come out in the end.
 
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BillH

Private
Joined
Sep 14, 2017
Location
SW Idaho
Hmmm. For Euro ears only, eh? Perhaps. That is one way to look at it. But instead of quoting a different man to make the point you want, how about looking at a longer statement, from the same man as the first? Kinda compare the statements, see what he might have meant... sound fair? OK, here is a link to Jefferson Davis' farewell speech when he left the U.S. gov't. I won't copy/paste the whole thing, but he makes the southern case for independence. Agree or disagree, the words are pretty plain. This too is real history. Remember, they are 19th C words and thoughts... and coming closer to the original founding than we are now to the CW, we need to take them seriously.
(my 2 cents)

 
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