The Last Confederate Reunion, 1944 photo

Joined
Jun 7, 2021
I'm finding these deaths of sons and a great grandson to be very ironic. Sadly ironic. I have to confess that I was unaware of these relationships.
It wasn't just the generals. Sergeant William Finacey died 7\3\1863 repulsing Pickett's charge. His great grandson, Leonard Francis Harsch, Electricians Mate on the USS Vincennes, died 8\10\1943 when the ship went down in the Battle of Savo Island. William was 27 years old, his great grandson was 20. The only reason this country exists is because of men like them.
 

farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
Some great comments here! I have been on TDY with my “grand-teens” from Miami, so glad to be somewhat sane again....
Here are some good ole Monroe County, Alabama Confederate vets, at early vet reunions. Most of these dear ole grizzlies are my kin folk.
You will see several of my beloved great-grandfather, Dr. Fielden Dailey, of the 17th Al. Infantry, who is my avatar. Took a minie ball in the head at Franklin (17 years old), survived and became a doctor by 1870.
He was a huge influence on my daddy. Here’s a pic of him going to a patient’s house in 1925, with Daddy in background. ( I wish I knew the gadget he put on my gt.grandmother’s wrist 🤪)


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His oldest son also became a physician. Here’s a fun one of “The Doc” at the wheel with son, who was his partner in practice. Neither one looks too happy 😃.
I colorized the rest, which are not great, but show up a little better than b/w....
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And here’s a few of the reunions....what stories these great old soldiers probably told....
The Doc is 4th from left on front row...many of these were in the 5th Infantry with Army of N.Va.
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Below is mostly 5th Infantry. #6 is The Doc’s brother, Sam, who was wounded at Chancellorsville, came home and was Sheriff from 3 terms. #14 is their brother-in-law, “Uncle Pat”, a lad from Ireland.
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This last one is endearing. The Doc( 2nd from right) holding his rifle, next is another gt.uncle holding his sword, and next one holding a cannon ball.

Bless their hearts...all our vets, everywhere, every place, any time....
 

OldmanReb

Private
Joined
Jul 19, 2021
I remember hearing about this. I lived in Simpson County my childhood. My grandfather would’ve attended if he was alive. But he died in ‘38 at the age of 99. Lovely old fellow he was.
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Here is a photo of him at the house of my father and myself. I know it is our family home as it is elevated off the ground, pa did this so that when it would rain, the groundwater would stay in the ground. Funny man my father was, must have taken after my grandfather.
 

Cycom

Corporal
Joined
Feb 19, 2021
Location
Los Angeles, California
I remember hearing about this. I lived in Simpson County my childhood. My grandfather would’ve attended if he was alive. But he died in ‘38 at the age of 99. Lovely old fellow he was.View attachment 408986
Here is a photo of him at the house of my father and myself. I know it is our family home as it is elevated off the ground, pa did this so that when it would rain, the groundwater would stay in the ground. Funny man my father was, must have taken after my grandfather.
Thank you for sharing all of these pictures. You have a family full of American history and that is fantastic.
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
Thank you for sharing all of these pictures. You have a family full of American history and that is fantastic.
So true !

Many families in the South have so many stories that have never been told.
( Northern families as well ) .

They were not trying to hide or forget anything, but only trying to get back on their feet after the War.

But, I can only speak for my family.

They remembered many stories that had been passed down about "reconstruction" ... but since that
generation came of age during the Great Depression and the World War II years, that's all they talked about ... even into the 1990's.
 

farrargirl

Corporal
Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Location
Baldwin County, on the Alabama Gulf Coast
So true !

Many families in the South have so many stories that have never been told.
( Northern families as well ) .

They were not trying to hide or forget anything, but only trying to get back on their feet after the War.

But, I can only speak for my family.

They remembered many stories that had been passed down about "reconstruction" ... but since that
generation came of age during the Great Depression and the World War II years, that's all they talked about ... even into the 1990's.
So true. My grandmother told me so many great stories about her father , The Doc. How she would go along with him in his carriage around the county making house calls, sometimes delivering a baby or other medical care, in ex-change for a good mess of turnip greens or collards from their garden. He was a fairly tough disciplinarian on all his nine children. But I was told he never ever spoke to his family about the war. Not one word. So I guess these re-unions were a way for this brotherhood to be around the men who understood......
 
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Location
Southwest Mississippi
So true. My grandmother told me so many great stories about her father , The Doc. How she would go along with him in his carriage around the county making house calls, sometimes delivering a baby or other medical care, in ex-change for a good mess of turnip greens or collards from their garden. He was a fairly tough disciplinarian on all his nine children. But I was told he never ever spoke to his family about the war. Not one word. So I guess these re-unions were a way for this brotherhood to be around the men who understood......
That's virtually identical to my maternal Grandfather's story.

Although he never went to War, he was in the US Army's Veterinarian section when WW 1 ended in 1918.
Yep , even in 1918 the US Army still had thousands of horses.

After WW 1,
He took care of many of his friend's livestock until he passed in 1960.
And while he didn't deliver any babies, he helped many cows deliver their calf.

Oh yeah,

" a good mess of turnip greens or collards"
That's a very fair trade !

:smoke:
 
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Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
I remember hearing about this. I lived in Simpson County my childhood. My grandfather would’ve attended if he was alive. But he died in ‘38 at the age of 99. Lovely old fellow he was.View attachment 408986
Here is a photo of him at the house of my father and myself. I know it is our family home as it is elevated off the ground, pa did this so that when it would rain, the groundwater would stay in the ground. Funny man my father was, must have taken after my grandfather.
What a great archive of photos! Thanks for showing them to us! I enjoyed this more than I can say.
 
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