The Knights of the Ku Klux Klan

matthew mckeon

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#1
This slim volume was published in 1941, updated from 1921. The author is listed as Colonel Winfield Jones, a journalist, who Wikipedia assured was not a member of the KKK, but from Missouri(?).

The first part of the book retails the horrors of Reconstruction, where the Freedman's Bureau is compared with Stalin, and Nathan Bedford Forrest is highly praised.

Then we get to what was for them, current events. The revival of the Klan under the leadership of Colonel William Joseph Simmons. Simmons is also highly praised, although his colonel's rank was in a fraternal order called the Woodmen. After leading his organization into new heights, with charity to all, utterly without any nastiness at all, he is bought out by Hiram Wesley Evans, Texan dentist. I mean literally bought out, he was paid a large sum to turn over the Klan to Evans.

DC Stephenson, the Indiana Grand Wizard, rapist and murderer, is not mentioned for some reason.

The book changes direction suddenly. Abruptly, Simmons goes from hero to goat, while Evans is a new mastermind. Evans goes from success to success, but inexplicably the Klan falls apart. Evans quits to be replaced by Colescott, and the future seems bright as a burning cross.

Historically, the Klan riven by factions, scandals, and a consensus that they were a bunch of losers, craters with the Second World War, its anti Catholic, anti Jewish, and anti black message even less appealing with the defeat of the Nazis.

My review is actually more interesting than the book. Not recommended, although it does contain a Klan singalong, and a lot of words that don't usually start with K, starting with K.
 

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Pat Young

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#2
This slim volume was published in 1941, updated from 1921. The author is listed as Colonel Winfield Jones, a journalist, who Wikipedia assured was not a member of the KKK, but from Missouri(?).

The first part of the book retails the horrors of Reconstruction, where the Freedman's Bureau is compared with Stalin, and Nathan Bedford Forrest is highly praised.

Then we get to what was for them, current events. The revival of the Klan under the leadership of Colonel William Joseph Simmons. Simmons is also highly praised, although his colonel's rank was in a fraternal order called the Woodmen. After leading his organization into new heights, with charity to all, utterly without any nastiness at all, he is bought out by Hiram Wesley Evans, Texan dentist. I mean literally bought out, he was paid a large sum to turn over the Klan to Evans.

DC Stephenson, the Indiana Grand Wizard, rapist and murderer, is not mentioned for some reason.

The book changes direction suddenly. Abruptly, Simmons goes from hero to goat, while Evans is a new mastermind. Evans goes from success to success, but inexplicably the Klan falls apart. Evans quits to be replaced by Colescott, and the future seems bright as a burning cross.

Historically, the Klan riven by factions, scandals, and a consensus that they were a bunch of losers, craters with the Second World War, its anti Catholic, anti Jewish, and anti black message even less appealing with the defeat of the Nazis.

My review is actually more interesting than the book. Not recommended, although it does contain a Klan singalong, and a lot of words that don't usually start with K, starting with K.
Simmons, according to the most recent history of the KKK:

a southern racist Spanish-American War veteran (though one who never saw action— his unit reached Cuba only after the war ended) turned self-proclaimed minister. (See figure 2.) Hired as an itinerant preacher by a Methodist Episcopal Church, he was promptly fired for “inefficiency,” a trait he duplicated in the Klan. 4 Afterward he drifted among occupations: garter salesman, teacher, and paid organizer for a number of fraternal orders. Seemingly addicted to joining organizations in search of a livelihood— he belonged to several churches and fifteen different fraternal orders— he decided to create his own fraternal group. Inspired by Birth of a Nation and the Leo Frank lynching,

Simmons began studying up on the first Klan. (He later claimed that the idea came to him in a mystical vision in 1901, but if so, he did not act on it for fourteen years.) He got a copy of the original Klan’s “Prescript” and used it, as well as Masonic rites, as a basis for a new ritual. It repeated the first Klan’s chorus of hatred and fear of African Americans, arguing that “no new environment” could ever overcome their “hereditary handicap.” 5 His propaganda also reflected the anti-radical hysteria of the World War I era. “Startling and indisputable facts,” he claimed, showed that “the hairy claw of Bolshevism, Socialism, Syndicalism, I.W.W.ism and other isms . . . are seeking in an insidious but powerful manner to undermine the
very fundamentals of the Nation.” 6 Governmental actions— framing and executing anarchist immigrants Sacco and Vanzetti, and deporting more than five hundred immigrant citizens accused of disloyalty— created a model for the Klan’s fight to exclude the “wrong kind” of people from belonging in America.

Gordon, Linda. The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition (p. 12). Liveright. Kindle Edition.
 

Pat Young

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#3
It would be funny if they weren't terrorists:

In 1915 Simmons advertised, inviting men into a new Ku Klux Klan, which he characterized as “A Classy Order of the Highest Class, No ‘Rough Necks,’ ‘Rowdies,’ nor ‘Yellow Streaks.’ . . . REAL MEN whose oaths are inviolate are needed.” 7 He managed to gather a few dozen joiners, including several elderly men who had been members of the first Klan. 8 He appointed himself the Imperial Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. But like the fraternals he knew, his group developed rituals but no plan of action. Simmons seems to have been somewhat delusional. Among his fabrications was a claim to have been a secret investigator for the federal government during the war, a boast that brought US Secret Service agents to investigate. He maintained, a few years later, that this experience led him to plan a “secret service” of fifty thousand Klansmen who would act as moles, reporting to him on immoral behavior in every community in the United States, behavior the Klan could then correct. 9 He made a disastrous move in buying the financially struggling Baptist Lanier
University in Atlanta, which then promised to admit only “real Americans.” Each state would build its own building, and poor students would be admitted gratis. Only twenty-five enrolled; forced into bankruptcy, he had to sell it. 10 Proving not much of an organizer, in five years Simmons managed to collect only a few hundred Klansmen. Moreover, his principles proved weak. Needing an income, in his application to register his new Ku Klux Klan he labeled it a private “bottle club,” thus evading Prohibition. He never even produced a roster of members, and his liquor sales were not profitable.

Gordon, Linda. The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition (p. 13). Liveright. Kindle Edition.
Gordon, Linda. The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition (pp. 12-13). Liveright. Kindle Edition.
 
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#5
It looks like the description of Winfield Jones as being from Missouri but not a member of the KKK is from a site called metapedia, which mimics wikipedia's look and layout. This is the mission statement from metapeda:

Being able to present one’s own definitions of concepts as well as interpretations of various phenomena and historical events is a vital part of every metapolitical and cultural struggle. This is more important than ever in these modern times, where many concepts have been distorted and lost their original meaning – which can be regarded as a result of our political opponents’ successful cultural struggle.

The possibility to influence the language is vital if you want to shape people’s world view. The Frankfurt School and their ideological heirs are good examples in this regard, and have been very successful in stigmatizing previously natural and sound values and attitudes and making them seem pathological by inventing and popularizing concepts such as “xenophobia” and the like. This clearly illustrates the power of language and words, and it is therefore important that we start re-conquering our languages.

Another important purpose of Metapedia is to become a web resource for pro-European activists. Metapedia makes it easy for our cadres to expand their knowledge on various important subjects, and also functions as a searchable reference.

Furthermore Metapedia gives us the opportunity to present a more balanced and fair image of the pro-European struggle for the general public as well as for academics, who until now have been dependent on strongly biased and hostile “researchers” like Searchlight, Anti-Defamation League, Southern Poverty Law Center, Simon Wiesenthal Centre, and such.

Metapedia welcomes those who willing to contribute constructively to this noble effort.
metapedia

Probably not the most reliable source on whether Jones' closet contained white robes.
 

Pat Young

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#6
It looks like the description of Winfield Jones as being from Missouri but not a member of the KKK is from a site called metapedia, which mimics wikipedia's look and layout. This is the mission statement from metapeda:



metapedia

Probably not the most reliable source on whether Jones' closet contained white robes.
Metapedia is Alt-Right's version of wiki.
 

WJC

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#7
This slim volume was published in 1941, updated from 1921. The author is listed as Colonel Winfield Jones, a journalist, who Wikipedia assured was not a member of the KKK, but from Missouri(?).

The first part of the book retails the horrors of Reconstruction, where the Freedman's Bureau is compared with Stalin, and Nathan Bedford Forrest is highly praised.

Then we get to what was for them, current events. The revival of the Klan under the leadership of Colonel William Joseph Simmons. Simmons is also highly praised, although his colonel's rank was in a fraternal order called the Woodmen. After leading his organization into new heights, with charity to all, utterly without any nastiness at all, he is bought out by Hiram Wesley Evans, Texan dentist. I mean literally bought out, he was paid a large sum to turn over the Klan to Evans.

DC Stephenson, the Indiana Grand Wizard, rapist and murderer, is not mentioned for some reason.

The book changes direction suddenly. Abruptly, Simmons goes from hero to goat, while Evans is a new mastermind. Evans goes from success to success, but inexplicably the Klan falls apart. Evans quits to be replaced by Colescott, and the future seems bright as a burning cross.

Historically, the Klan riven by factions, scandals, and a consensus that they were a bunch of losers, craters with the Second World War, its anti Catholic, anti Jewish, and anti black message even less appealing with the defeat of the Nazis.

My review is actually more interesting than the book. Not recommended, although it does contain a Klan singalong, and a lot of words that don't usually start with K, starting with K.
I don't know the book's price, but your review was priceless! Thanks!
 

WJC

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#8
It would be funny if they weren't terrorists:

In 1915 Simmons advertised, inviting men into a new Ku Klux Klan, which he characterized as “A Classy Order of the Highest Class, No ‘Rough Necks,’ ‘Rowdies,’ nor ‘Yellow Streaks.’ . . . REAL MEN whose oaths are inviolate are needed.” 7 He managed to gather a few dozen joiners, including several elderly men who had been members of the first Klan. 8 He appointed himself the Imperial Wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. But like the fraternals he knew, his group developed rituals but no plan of action. Simmons seems to have been somewhat delusional. Among his fabrications was a claim to have been a secret investigator for the federal government during the war, a boast that brought US Secret Service agents to investigate. He maintained, a few years later, that this experience led him to plan a “secret service” of fifty thousand Klansmen who would act as moles, reporting to him on immoral behavior in every community in the United States, behavior the Klan could then correct. 9 He made a disastrous move in buying the financially struggling Baptist Lanier
University in Atlanta, which then promised to admit only “real Americans.” Each state would build its own building, and poor students would be admitted gratis. Only twenty-five enrolled; forced into bankruptcy, he had to sell it. 10 Proving not much of an organizer, in five years Simmons managed to collect only a few hundred Klansmen. Moreover, his principles proved weak. Needing an income, in his application to register his new Ku Klux Klan he labeled it a private “bottle club,” thus evading Prohibition. He never even produced a roster of members, and his liquor sales were not profitable.

Gordon, Linda. The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition (p. 13). Liveright. Kindle Edition.
Gordon, Linda. The Second Coming of the KKK: The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition (pp. 12-13). Liveright. Kindle Edition.
Terrorists who literally ran some city, county and state governments. It is beyond our scope here, but the story of the Klan in Indiana is chillingly similar to some of history's most notorious dictatorships.
 



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