The Irish Brigade at Gettysburg and their Monument

donna

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#21
Glorybound Thanks for all the pictures. They add so much to the story of the Irish Brigade. The painting by Mark Maritato of the 28th Massachusetts Regiment of the Irish Tiffany flag is a beautiful painting.

The 28th Massachusetts continued to display pride in their Irish ancestry. Most regiments carried a state flag and a national flag. The 28th Massachusetts took pride in their Irish flags. One of the flags became known as the Tiffany flag. It was made by Tiffany and Co. of New York in 1862. The hand-stitched silk flag is green with a harp in the center below a grouping of clouds. Clover dot the bottom of the image.

The Battle of Fredericksburg was the first conflict for the Tiffany flag. The three New York Regiments of the Irish Brigade has sent for replacement flags. So the 28th Massachusetts was the only regiment to carry the green flag that day. The sight of the flag being continuously marched up Marye's Heights became deeply symbolic of the Irish-American relationship with their new country.

Most of the Tiffany flags did not survive the war. The remaining pieces of this flag have been set against a replacement green backdrop. The difference in color can be seen on close viewing. The regiment presented the flag to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts at the end of the war. It currently resides in the Massachusetts State House.
 

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Lefty

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#22
One of the least known/visited spots on the entire Getttysburg Battlefield is where the Irish brigade, after their face-to-face clash with Joe Kershaw's boys etc..... dug in on the evening of July 2 & thru-out the days on July 3/4.

The earthworks there are substantial..... being 2-3 ft. high. These earthworks/breastworks are not as visible as those reconstucted by the CCC during the '30's on Culp's Hill. They are truly a semi-hidden gem. Search the 1869 Warren Map to locate them and once found, respect them by walking not on, but astride them.

FWIW,
You've got to respect any brigade that fought with .69 smoothbores. Eye to eye. Buck & ball. Wearing fraternal boxwood sprigs and Close enough to smell the fear & and taste that death.
 

Glorybound

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#23
One of the least known/visited spots on the entire Getttysburg Battlefield is where the Irish brigade, after their face-to-face clash with Joe Kershaw's boys etc..... dug in on the evening of July 2 & thru-out the days on July 3/4.

The earthworks there are substantial..... being 2-3 ft. high. These earthworks/breastworks are not as visible as those reconstucted by the CCC during the '30's on Culp's Hill. They are truly a semi-hidden gem. Search the 1869 Warren Map to locate them and once found, respect them by walking not on, but astride them.

FWIW,
You've got to respect any brigade that fought with .69 smoothbores. Eye to eye. Buck & ball. Wearing fraternal boxwood sprigs and Close enough to smell the fear & and taste that death.
Thank you for your post, Lefty. I hadn't a clue about the earthworks before.

Lee
 
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#28
69thInfRegColor2013.0022.jpg


This is the "Irish Color" presented to the 69th New York Volunteers on November 18, 1861. They carried this flag through the Peninsula Campaign, the Seven Days, and at Antietam. At Antietam, 8 bearers were hit carrying the flag and Captain James McGee picked up the color and carried them from the field when the brigade withdrew. On December 2, 1862, Captain McGee brought the flag back to New York City and it was retired. The scroll at the bottom reads, "RIAM NAR DRUID O SBAIRN LANN" or "Who Never Retreated Clash of Spears".

Ryan
 

JPK Huson 1863

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#29
Thanks for the flag, RP. It's too easy, looking at all the cellophane pompoms and plastic green glasses, forgetting what that harp and those words, only an immigrant would read, meant.

Can you imagine, retired in 1862, with so much of the war ahead but it had already seen so much- 8 bearers hit?
 

Pat Young

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#30
Thanks for the flag, RP. It's too easy, looking at all the cellophane pompoms and plastic green glasses, forgetting what that harp and those words, only an immigrant would read, meant.

Can you imagine, retired in 1862, with so much of the war ahead but it had already seen so much- 8 bearers hit?
The Irish harp is the symbol of Ireland.
 

donna

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#31
Bumping for St. Patrick's Day. A beautiful monument. Always love the Irish Wolfhound.

Did some research and the Irish Wolfhound actually came to America later. It is an old breed . It is suppose to be the largest breed of dog. They are truly magniicant animals.

Two US presidents had Wolfhounds. They were Herbert Hoover and John F. Kennedy.
 



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