The Great Locomotive Chase 1862 (Andrews' Raiders)

Patrick H

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You can see from that video why the Central Pacific, working its way east from Sacramento, had so much harder going than the Union Pacific, working west across the plains from Omaha. (Althugh this particular video was shot in the Rockies, not the Sierra Nevada.)

This looks like a photo of someone's basement model railroad:

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Yes, it does! Thanks, Andy.
 

bdtex

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The Chattanooga National Cemetery (Andrews' Raiders)

* The cemetery with Lookout Mountain in the background.

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* The Ohio Tribute Monument to the Andrews' Raiders.

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* Burial Site of James J. Andrews (Executed in Atlanta, Georgia)

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* Burial Site of an Union Raider (Executed in Atlanta, Georgia)

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* Photos courtesy of William Bechmann (2013)
Great pictures. That really is a very picturesque place. I took virtually the same shots during my visit there last June and posted them in my Chattanooga/Chickamauga thread. Clear blue skies during my visit too.
 

rebelatsea

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YIKES! I noticed that a piece of ash or soot attached itself to the camera lens (or the protective filter). Now, granted, this is sort of like the "Little Engine That Could": It's not pulling a long, heavy train. But she sure is climbing some impressive grades. I love this. I have shared a link with two of my railroad friends. (One of them has driven both the Challenger and the 844 Union Pacific steamers, but I doubt he's ever had his hands on the controls of a wood burner.) Thanks, Andy!
Just beautiful, and judging by how clean the exhaust is , the fireman is a real master of his job.
 

Buckeye Bill

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Great pictures. That really is a very picturesque place. I took virtually the same shots during my visit there last June and posted them in my Chattanooga/Chickamauga thread. Clear blue skies during my visit too.

Thanks, Texan!

"The Great Locomotive Chase" tour was one of my favorite ACW tours. It was a joy to retrace the steps of Andrews' Raiders, starting at the Kennesaw House Motel and ending just outside of Ringgold Gap.

I would highly recommend a visit to James Andrews and the executed U.S. Soldiers graves at the Chattanooga National Cemetery. The Ohio Monument is a site to see (the graves surround this monument).

Bill
 

bdtex

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I would highly recommend a visit to James Andrews and the executed U.S. Soldiers graves at the Chattanooga National Cemetery. The Ohio Monument is a site to see (the graves surround this monument).
That's what I was referring to. Went there last June.
 

James N.

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There is a small museum in an old railroad depot in Adairsville, GA, too. The curator was very full of information about the chase. This was years before my interest in the CW.

Another small but not-to-be-missed museum is at the location of the 1857-built tunnel at Tunnel Hill, Ga. Although it's now closed to rail traffic and the tracks have been removed as you can see from my photos, it has been replaced by a wider one just to the left and purposely out-of-frame above. The bottom photo shows it from the opposite side. After seeing the exhibits in the small building, a motorized cart takes you on a ride through the tunnel and back giving a close-up look. Note in the first photo the original iron gates bearing the W&A logo for the Western & Atlantic RR.

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Buckeye Bill

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President Abraham Lincoln signs into law on this day in 1862 a measure calling for the awarding of a U.S. Army Medal of Honor. This award would be issued to noncommissioned officers and privates which distinguished themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities during the present insurrection. The previous December, Lincoln had approved a provision creating an U.S. Navy Medal of Valor, which was the basis of the Army Medal of Honor created by Congress. The first U.S. Army soldiers to receive what would become the nation’s highest military honor were six members of a Federal raiding force. These soldiers penetrated deep into Confederate territory to destroy bridges and railroad tracks between Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Atlanta, Georgia.

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Chattahooch33

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Legend has it that the General was sitting next to the Atlanta Rolling Mill during the destruction of Atlanta. The fire from the mill spread to the ammunition trains on the track which generated enormous blasts. Everything for hundred of yards around it was leveled but the engine survived with only a solid shot through the smokestack.
 

Buckeye Bill

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Legend has it that the General was sitting next to the Atlanta Rolling Mill during the destruction of Atlanta. The fire from the mill spread to the ammunition trains on the track which generated enormous blasts. Everything for hundred of yards around it was leveled but the engine survived with only a solid shot through the smokestack.

Great stuff!
 

AndyHall

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Wow, did they really use all that bright red paint on them back in the day? I never knew that!
They did. Those all locomotives, at least when they were new and well-maintained, were spectacular, all bright paint and polished brass. It was later, in the 1880s, but they started to get subdued paint schemes and generally ended up gray and black. Check out these examples from the immediate postwar period:

https://sites.smu.edu/cdm/cul/hal/
 

nitrofd

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north central florida
They did. Those all locomotives, at least when they were new and well-maintained, were spectacular, all bright paint and polished brass. It was later, in the 1880s, but they started to get subdued paint schemes and generally ended up gray and black. Check out these examples from the immediate postwar period:

https://sites.smu.edu/cdm/cul/hal/
Those are some beautiful pieces of mechanical artwork.
 
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