The Great Emancipator? Emancipated What?


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unionblue

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#42
No it's not. In fact, I will now delay the citation until tomorrow.
No need.

Battle Cry of Freedom, by James McPherson, Chapter 16, pg. 497:

"...Soon after Union forces captured Port Royal, South Carolina, in November 1861, a private described an incident there that made him "ashamed of America"; "About 8-10 soldiers from the New York 47th chased some Negro women but they escaped, so the took a Negro girl about 7-9 years old, and raped her."

The source given for this passage is Wiley, Billy Yank, 40, 44, 114.
 

cash

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#43
No need.

Battle Cry of Freedom, by James McPherson, Chapter 16, pg. 497:

"...Soon after Union forces captured Port Royal, South Carolina, in November 1861, a private described an incident there that made him "ashamed of America"; "About 8-10 soldiers from the New York 47th chased some Negro women but they escaped, so the took a Negro girl about 7-9 years old, and raped her."

The source given for this passage is Wiley, Billy Yank, 40, 44, 114.
Does this tell us anything about Lincoln as the Great Emancipator?
 

jgoodguy

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#44
And McPherson also details many of the sadistic cruelties United States soldiers inflicted upon African-American Confederate citizens, including helpless children. Pretty ugly stuff.
This is not Facebook where a person can make all sorts of remarks, we need evidence here. Thanks for your comments but expect to back them up, please.
 

jgoodguy

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#47
No need.

Battle Cry of Freedom, by James McPherson, Chapter 16, pg. 497:

"...Soon after Union forces captured Port Royal, South Carolina, in November 1861, a private described an incident there that made him "ashamed of America"; "About 8-10 soldiers from the New York 47th chased some Negro women but they escaped, so the took a Negro girl about 7-9 years old, and raped her."

The source given for this passage is Wiley, Billy Yank, 40, 44, 114.
Free online Full text of "The Common Soldier In The Civil War The Life Of Billy Yank

Billy Yank gives his source for this story as
Ibid., 1, 824.
22 For description of a typical recruiting meeting, see James S. Clark,Life in the Middle West (Chicago, 1916), 44-47. Which is a dead end for me.
 

cash

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#50
Free online Full text of "The Common Soldier In The Civil War The Life Of Billy Yank

Billy Yank gives his source for this story as
Ibid., 1, 824.
22 For description of a typical recruiting meeting, see James S. Clark,Life in the Middle West (Chicago, 1916), 44-47. Which is a dead end for me.
The story in question is on p. 114 of my copy. The source is "John Bessemer to John Weissert, Nov. 17, 1861, manuscript, Univ. of Mich. This letter is in German script."

https://books.google.com/books?id=t...age&q=John Bessemer letters civil war&f=false
 

jgoodguy

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#51
Thanks! It turns out to be in the online copy too. I chased the wrong 22
 

Viper21

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#55
As the Union Army freed US territory from rebel control, any slaves were freed. Some chose the camps, others joined as soldiers in the Union army, some became support personnel, some independent contractors etc.
Sounds like freedom. How many just walked away, & started a new life vs. forced labor for the US..?
I was unaware that State governments loyal to the United States were illegitimate.
C'mon. You're very much aware of the point I was making.
Odd, Lincoln issued the EP and by the end of the War, all slaves were free in the occupied South. The 13th just put a nail in slavery's coffin to make sure that no post-war legislation would reenslave folks.
Key wording was occupied South. How about Delaware, Maryland, etc..? I stand by my assertion, the Union Army kinda freed some slaves. I say kinda by, taking them from one form of bondage, to enlisting their labor in another form. It took the 13th amendment to make slavery illegal in the entire country. It took faux representation to get a couple Southern states to pass the legislation during the war.

I'm not surprised that many disagree with my assertions, & opinions. Many folks hold Lincoln on a pedestal, & worship the man. I don't.
 
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#56
The fantasy that Lincoln was the only actor in the political drama is disingenuous. Congress enacted the basis for the EP in July of 1862. Lincoln and Seward were working on implementation, and they were concerned about being perceived as inciting a slave revolt.
Numerous United States generals were implementing emancipation strategies and were trying to evade General Halleck's very restrictive orders about not harboring fugitive slaves. After about 18 months of improvised solutions the EP gave clear permission for officers to emancipate slaves and began the process of formally enlisting black men in the US army.
I believe however the navy was already using black sailors and on board support personnel by July of 1862.
So the EP primarily switched emancipation from an individual decision, the friction process of chaos produced by war, to a formal process.
 
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#57
Why was this critical in the summer of 1862? Because of the total production of bales of ginned cotton recorded in the 1860 census for the US, 1.2M were produced in Mississippi and 780T were produced in Louisiana. https://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1860/agriculture/1860b-09.pdf?#
The decision could not be postponed further.
And Louisiana also produced 221T hogsheads of cane sugar in 1860, which was the real issue with Butler's administration of Louisiana, i.e. the sugar growers were being forced to pay wages.
 

wbull1

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#58
Sounds like freedom. How many just walked away, & started a new life vs. forced labor for the US..?

C'mon. You're very much aware of the point I was making.

Key wording was occupied South. How about Delaware, Maryland, etc..? I stand by my assertion, the Union Army kinda freed some slaves. I say kinda by, taking them from one form of bondage, to enlisting their labor in another form. It took the 13th amendment to make slavery illegal in the entire country. It took faux representation to get a couple Southern states to pass the legislation during the war.

I'm not surprised that many disagree with my assertions, & opinions. Many folks hold Lincoln on a pedestal, & worship the man. I don't.

The kinda bondage of the second part did not view children born to the former slaves to be the property of an outside person. The kinda bondage did not include some outside person being able to sell man and wife and separate them perhaps for the rest of their lives. I agree that some of the emancipated people were not treated well and were not entirely free. However, I do not agree that kinda bondage was equivalent to slavery that the people came from. They were emancipated from the worst aspects of slavery.
 
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#59
Just looking over the document and wondering if any of you have new ideas on what the Emancipation actually did besides tell the world the war is now about slavery. From what I can see it did not free Edited Plus it did not include border states or counties in Union controll. Just looking for some other ideas you may have.
The historian Eric Foner has made the point that emancipation was a process, not a one-time event. It is impossible to understand how emancipation unfolded with an examination of the EP alone. Impossible. There are many actions, behaviors, politics, laws, and events which were part of the process.

I point out this Chronology of Emancipation. It shows the evolution of policies and actions that led to the destruction of slavery. These are some highlights from the Chronology:

1861​
May
24 Fugitive slaves at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, are received and put to work by Union general Benjamin F. Butler, who declares them “contraband of war”​
August
6 First Confiscation Act nullifies owners' claims to fugitive slaves who had been employed in the Confederate war effort​
1862​
March
13 Congress adopts an additional article of war forbidding members of the army and navy to return fugitive slaves to their owners​
April
10 At Lincoln's request, Congress pledges financial aid to any state that undertakes gradual emancipation with compensation to owners​
16 Congress abolishes slavery in the District of Columbia, with compensation to loyal owners, and appropriates money for the voluntary removal (“colonization”) of former slaves to Haiti, Liberia, or other countries​
June
July
12 President Lincoln appeals to congressmen from the border states to support gradual, compensated emancipation, with colonization of freed slaves outside the United States, warning that if they do not act soon, slavery in their states “will be extinguished by mere friction and abrasion – by the mere incidents of the war”; two days later, a majority of the congressmen reject Lincoln's appeal​
17 Second Confiscation Act frees the slaves of persons engaged in or assisting the rebellion and provides for the seizure and sale of other property owned by disloyal citizens; it also forbids army and navy personnel to decide on the validity of any fugitive slave's claim to freedom or to surrender any fugitive to any claimant, and authorizes the president to employ “persons of African descent” in any capacity to suppress the rebellion​
17 Militia Act provides for the employment of “persons of African descent” in “any military or naval service for which they may be found competent,” granting freedom to slaves so employed (and to their families if they belong to disloyal owners)​
22 President Lincoln announces to his cabinet his intention to issue a proclamation freeing slaves in the rebel states, but agrees to postpone it until after a suitable military victory​
August
22 In New Orleans, General Benjamin F. Butler incorporates into Union forces several “Native Guard” units composed of free-black soldiers; soon thereafter he begins recruiting both free-black and ex-slave men for additional regiments​
25 After having withheld its permission for months, the War Department authorizes recruitment of black soldiers in the South Carolina Sea Islands​
September
22 Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Lincoln; it announces that all slaves in those states or portions of states still in rebellion as of January 1, 1863, will be declared free, pledges monetary aid for slave states not in rebellion that adopt either immediate or gradual emancipation, and reiterates support for the colonization of freed slaves outside the United States.​
1863​
January
1 Emancipation Proclamation issued by President Lincoln; it declares free all slaves in the Confederate states (except Tennessee, southern Louisiana, and parts of Virginia) and announces the Union's intention to enlist black soldiers and sailors. By late spring, recruitment is under way throughout the North and in all the Union-occupied Confederate states except Tennessee​
March
16 American Freedmen's Inquiry Commission appointed by Secretary of War Stanton to investigate the condition of former slaves and recommend measures for their employment and welfare​
October
3 War Department orders full-scale recruitment of black soldiers in Maryland, Missouri, and Tennessee, with compensation to loyal owners, irrespective of their owners' consent; enlisted soldiers are emancipated, but this does not apply to the enlistee's family members.​
1864​
March
16 New Arkansas state constitution, which abolishes slavery, is ratified by pro-Union voters​
April
8 Senate approves constitutional amendment abolishing slavery​
June
7 Enlistment in Kentucky opened to slave men irrespective of their owners' consent, with compensation to loyal owners; enlisted soldiers are emancipated, but this does not apply to the enlistee's family members.​
15 Congress makes pay of black soldiers (which had been $10 per month for all ranks) equal to that of white soldiers ($13 per month for privates, larger amounts for higher ranks); the change is retroactive to January 1, 1864, or, for men who were free before the war, to the time of enlistment​
20 Congress increases the pay of all privates, black and white, to $16 per month, with corresponding increases for higher ranks​
September
5 New Louisiana state constitution, which abolishes slavery, is ratified by pro-Union voters​
November
1 New Maryland state constitution, which abolishes slavery, takes effect, having been ratified in October​
1865​
January
11 Missouri state constitutional convention abolishes slavery​
31 House of Representatives approves constitutional amendment abolishing slavery, sending it to the states for ratification​
February
22 Amendment to Tennessee state constitution abolishes slavery​
March
3 Congress approves a joint resolution liberating the wives and children of black soldiers​
13 Confederate Congress authorizes President Jefferson Davis to recruit slave men as soldiers, with the permission of their owners; Confederate War Department issues order governing the enlistment on March 23.​
April
9 Surrender of the army of Confederate General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox Court House, Virginia​
December
18 Ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution announced by the Secretary of State; the amendment abolishes slavery throughout the United States​
------​
You asked what "what the Emancipation (Proclamation) actually did besides tell the world the war is now about slavery." The answer is that the EP was one part of a long process to end slavery. It was not the only one, and it was not even the zenith of the US's efforts to end slavery. It was a pivotal step in the evolution of the US Emancipation policy.

You said "From what I can see it did not free Edited Plus it did not include border states or counties in Union controll." Note that in various places before and after the EP, African Americans were freed from bondage in the United States. For example,

1862, April 16 Congress abolishes slavery in the District of Columbia, with compensation to loyal owners, and appropriates money for the voluntary removal (“colonization”) of former slaves to Haiti, Liberia, or other countries​
1863, October 3 War Department orders full-scale recruitment of black soldiers in Maryland, Missouri, and Tennessee, with compensation to loyal owners, irrespective of their owners' consent; enlisted soldiers are emancipated, but this does not apply to the enlistee's family members.​
1864, November 1 New Maryland state constitution, which abolishes slavery, takes effect, having been ratified in October​

There is a widespread, mistaken belief that enslaved people in the Union were not freed during the course of the war. In fact, probably the majority of enslaved people in the Union gained their freedom before the end of the war in the summer of 1865.

- Alan
 
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jackt62

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#60
Totally agree with that assessment of emancipation being a process. It can even be further extended back to the 18th century Northwest Ordinance which outlawed slavery within its boundaries, and the Constitutional clause eliminating the importation of slaves in I think 1807.
 

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