The Free State of Jones

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
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http://economics.yale.edu/sites/def...eminars/Economic-History/razaghian-050914.pdf

Note, nothing about exempting poor or needy families from the tax. Also, it wasn't out of concern for struggling farmers. It was out of concern for dwindling revenues. Typical of the abbeville institute, they take a snippet out of context and then weave a web of lies around it.

The abbeville writer wants us to believe the tax-in-kind was discontinued and replaced by a more fair tax. Such is not the case. The February 1864 tax was IN ADDITION TO all the other taxes, NOT INSTEAD OF those other taxes.

You should take a bit more time to look at different sources. The special exemptions are repeated multiple times in this instruction to assessors.

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=dul1.ark:/13960/t58d0qc0d;view=1up;seq=11;size=175

f9gl7m.jpg
 

cash

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Right here.

Andersonh1

Brigadier General
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Location
South Carolina
I looked at the source they claimed to use. It doesn't say what they claimed it says.

Look at the date and the title. That's not the February 1864 tax bill. It's the tax in kind. The abbeville writer is still wrong.

From the Abbeville article:

As for Confederate tax policy, the “tax-in-kind” that required farmers to give ten percent to the government, it was a tough tax in those farm-based areas and there were reports of rough tactics used to collect it. But the film essentially portrayed the Confederate army and tax collectors as barbarians. I was unsure if I was seeing the Confederate army or the first coming of Hitler’s Wehrmacht. One particularly nasty tax-collecting officer, a Lt. Barbour, was also a fictional character.

But the film left out the fact that the Confederate Congress changed the tax several times, including a major change in February 1864 that exempted poor and needy families but also heavily taxed the rich and affluent. One political scientist from Yale wrote that the Confederate Congress, in this new change, “taxed all property including slaves at 5%; all gold, silver, and jewels were taxed at 10%; all shares or interest in banks, companies or businesses were taxed at 5%; monies in any form were taxed at 5%; and taxes on profits were increased to 10%, with companies that made more than a 25% profit taxed at 25%.”[4] And all because of the complaints of, and out of concern for, struggling farmers.

I will go check the source, but the paragraph I've quoted and the bolded items are absolutely factual.

edit: I read the source again, and what the article claims, and the source supports, is that the rich found their taxes increased by the February 1864 tax law. The February tax law covered both tax in kind and other taxes, all in one piece of legislation.

http://docsouth.unc.edu/imls/lawsofcong/lawsofcong.html

There's tax in kind, there's sales taxes, there's property taxes, everything you can imagine, all in that February 1864 tax bill.
 
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cash

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
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Right here.


Looking at that in context, again the abbeville article is wrong. This says changes in the tax-in-kind were made because of women whose husbands were in the army, not due to farmers.
 

cash

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Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Right here.
From the Abbeville article:

As for Confederate tax policy, the “tax-in-kind” that required farmers to give ten percent to the government, it was a tough tax in those farm-based areas and there were reports of rough tactics used to collect it. But the film essentially portrayed the Confederate army and tax collectors as barbarians. I was unsure if I was seeing the Confederate army or the first coming of Hitler’s Wehrmacht. One particularly nasty tax-collecting officer, a Lt. Barbour, was also a fictional character.

But the film left out the fact that the Confederate Congress changed the tax several times, including a major change in February 1864 that exempted poor and needy families but also heavily taxed the rich and affluent. One political scientist from Yale wrote that the Confederate Congress, in this new change, “taxed all property including slaves at 5%; all gold, silver, and jewels were taxed at 10%; all shares or interest in banks, companies or businesses were taxed at 5%; monies in any form were taxed at 5%; and taxes on profits were increased to 10%, with companies that made more than a 25% profit taxed at 25%.”[4] And all because of the complaints of, and out of concern for, struggling farmers.

I will go check the source, but the paragraph I've quoted and the bolded items are absolutely factual.

No, they are not. Read what you quoted in context, not just the small snippet you posted.
 

saddlebum92

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May 11, 2016
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Nevada
Just left Tishomingo county and the Shiloh Battlefield left me with food for thought....the adjacent area of Tennessee to North Mississippi fielded both Cavalry and Infantry to the UNION Army, so apparently the pro-Union sentiment was regional. The histories don't really reflect this, or the attempted secession from the Confederacy of Winston County, Alabama either. Though the appearance of en bloc secession is the accepted version of history, it looks as though Shelby Foote was spot on, when he said "The South lost the War, but they WON the Peace...."
 
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saddlebum92

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May 11, 2016
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Nevada
I often wonder why NBF has such a reputation, yet Benjamin Grierson, who played much the same game wearing BLUE, is so little-known. Another example of the South "winning the peace", I suppose. Grierson was a talented cavalryman and an exceptional leader, who was assigned a dirty, dangerous mission to confuse, demoralize, and disrupt Confederate troops and civilians while Billy Sherman made his march to the sea. Postwar, he commanded a regiment of Buffalo Soldiers against the Apache and other southwestern Native Americans with equal success. He proceeded with his missions with little publicity or fuss, never confusing the steak with the sizzle. And of course, he never lent his name for a minute to an untoward and unamerican group or activity....my father was Army for thirty-two years, and his highest statement of praise, (and his method of judgment )was..."he did his job"...Ben Grierson always did...
 

nitrofd

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Jan 20, 2013
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north central florida
Well,the movie broke 20 million in sales this weekend ,ending up with $20,364,424 in sales but it is now it is only on 506 screens down from 2,612.if you want to catch it do it now because it will be gone and you'll have to wait for the DVD.
 

saddlebum92

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May 11, 2016
Location
Nevada
Typical big splash-to big-splash marketingthey should slow down the release sched for one like this...it is a good story, and fairly well told, though it isn't absolutely accurate....but if it pulls a few more history-buffs into the subject, it surely might lead to more and better. I took my gal to see it; I liked it, she loved it....and I suspect she'll be visiting some sites with me, now....<grinn>
 

saddlebum92

Private
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May 11, 2016
Location
Nevada
25 pages.....whoooooeeeeee.....looks like that war ain't over yet, doesn't it?

Seriously, there is a very strong streak of revisionism going on in our country just now, and it makes me wonder just where it is leading. Abbeville seems to be just one portion of it. The Rebellion was over before it started; a slave economy did not allow for the manufacturing base needed for such a struggle, nor did the topography. All the will in the world won't make up for a lack of the "Sinews of War", though it might have forced a better negotiated peace. Davis should have known better, if no one else saw it; Rhett Butler was right. Too bad he was fictional..maybe some of the dandy boys might have listened. The American fighting man is not in question; our ability to be handed a bill of goods and pay too high a price **** sure is. We are as a nation STILL paying the price of that little bit of lunacy. It may have been glorious, but it was too close to fatal....and the heat this film has generated clearly shows that it will yet be some time before all the bills are paid.
 

KansasFreestater

1st Lieutenant
I often wonder why NBF has such a reputation, yet Benjamin Grierson, who played much the same game wearing BLUE, is so little-known. Another example of the South "winning the peace", I suppose. Grierson was a talented cavalryman and an exceptional leader, who was assigned a dirty, dangerous mission to confuse, demoralize, and disrupt Confederate troops and civilians while Billy Sherman made his march to the sea. Postwar, he commanded a regiment of Buffalo Soldiers against the Apache and other southwestern Native Americans with equal success. He proceeded with his missions with little publicity or fuss, never confusing the steak with the sizzle. And of course, he never lent his name for a minute to an untoward and unamerican group or activity....my father was Army for thirty-two years, and his highest statement of praise, (and his method of judgment )was..."he did his job"...Ben Grierson always did...
Don't forget that long before the Georgia campaign, it was Grierson's raid through Mississippi that distracted the local forces enough to make possible Grant's Vicksburg campaign.

Re: Grierson and the Indians after the war, he was definitely a more humane guy than many other U.S. soldiers during the Plains Indian Wars, and IIRC he even had friction with his superiors because of it.

And perhaps the most intriguing thing of all -- to me, at least -- is that before the Civil War, he was scared to death of horses. He was a music teacher, of all things, who'd been traumatized and seriously injured in a childhood horse accident -- and ended up being one of the most dazzling cavalry leaders of either side during the war! I find so inspiring his example of overcoming limitations. That, and his example of keeping one's decency and humanity even during the horror, cruelty and barbarism of war. Only by God's grace....
 
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