The Failure Of The South To Convince Delaware To Secede


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O' Be Joyful

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#84
Where in any part of my post did I state that?
Of course you did not.

You conveniently ignore previous provocations by Virginia troops to continue your own narrative of poor oppressed Maryland. And everything that was presented in the thread I linked and which you started.
 

O' Be Joyful

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#85
As noted here:
View attachment 297754

If so, you or someone should contact the Maryland State archives.
As further left out info:

Gov. Hicks maintained a stance of neutrality until he discovered the designs of the secessionists, which he later described as a senator on Feb. 28, 1863. From the Congressional Globe pgs. 1372-1373: http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=llcg&fileName=063/llcg063.db&recNum=461

Now, back to Delaware. Sorry for my diversion.
 
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#86
I think that was one of the biggest reasons Delaware stayed. They were more affraid of Lincoln then they were of Davis.
In the book House Divided: Slavery and Emancipation in Delaware, 1638 — 1865, historian Patience Essah writes ( p161):

Delaware, though a slave state, chose to remain in the Union. The decision not to secede encountered relatively little opposition from the two Delawares. The existing political animosities made it unlikely that Delaware could ever muster a secession majority. Northern and Republican Delaware supported the war as the best means to preserve the Union. Democrats and southern Delaware opposed the war; indeed many favored the Confederacy but seemed unwilling to support disunion.​
White Delawareans, Democratic and Republican, agreed it would be suicidal to secede. Given the state’s size and location and the nature of its economy, its interest clearly would be best served with in the Union. And at issue was the state’s pride: Delaware boasted of being the first state to enter the Union and swore that if need be, it would be the last state to sever those ties. Hence, in answer to a call from Georgia to secede, the Legislature replied that “as Delaware was the first to adopt, so will she be the last to abandon the Federal Constitution.”​
On 3 January 1861 the Delaware legislature overwhelmingly voted against secession. (Emphasis added) And consequently, the state supported various attempts intended to prevent secession, including the Crittenden Resolution and the Washington Peace Conference, both of which would have forever guaranteed slavery where it existed.​

- Alan
 
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#87
From "The Failure Of The South To Convince Delaware To Secede" from the blog This Cruel War An Evidence-Based Exploration of the Causes and Ramifications of the American Civil War:

Delaware’s Response (to Secession Commissioners from the South)
(Delaware) Governor Burton submitted (Georgia secession commissioner) Campbell’s plea to the General Assembly, again stressing that it call for a secession convention. The Senate responds with a plea for Georgia to remain in the Union, explaining that “as Delaware was the first to adopt, so she will be the last to abandon the Federal Constitution.”​
dela-map-118x250.jpg
That same day, in a joint secession, the entire legislature declared to Georgia that “no State has the right or the power to dissolve these relations” with the Federal government. They continued, quoting Daniel Webster’s 1833 response to John C. Calhoun: “there can be no such thing as secession without revolution.”​
They held that “like any other revolutionary act,” seceding from the United States, “can only be justified by the extremity of oppression.” They were certain that “no such extremity of oppression as will justify revolutionary action has been suffered by the people of the State of Delaware or any of her sister States.” Secession was, they concluded, a “mistaken policy.” 11​
In the end, of course, Delaware came no closer to secession. This did not mean, however, that they suddenly gave up slavery. Though there were less than 600 slaveowners enslaving around 1,800 slaves within the state, those relative few were fully dedicated to the institution. Despite the fact that over 91% of the state’s black people were free, the slaveowning class were desperate to continue their lifestyle.​
Sussex County, which held 75% of the state’s remaining slaves was also a hotbed for secession. There was open support for the Confederate government, and even local militias that were widely thought to be forming for the Southern army. 12​
Still, the state remained loyal, furnishing over 12,000 troops to the United States armies, including nearly 1,000 black Americans. The words of the secession commissioners, however, were true. Lincoln’s plan, it seems, was to free the slaves. Before 1861 had ended, he would begin to make serious plans to convince the Delaware legislature to adopt a compensated and gradual emancipation. This, however, is a story for another time.​

- Alan
 
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#88
I'm using Maryland as the evidence. Maryland was forced to stay in the Union by threat of military invasion and imprisoned politicians. Delaware and Maryland's decisions were linked. A fact that the Union North was well aware of I'm sure.

Read how Delaware's representatives acted during the War if you want evidence. They were infuriated with the Republicans. Most notebly Senator Willard Saulsbury; however, Senator Bayard felt the same way.
I've certainly seen some of the speeches/comments that Saulsbury and Bayard made regarding Lincoln and the Republicans, particularly the support of slavery and opposition to the suspension of Habeas Corpus, but I've not seen anything they said that would lead me to believe they were swayed to remain in the Union by the possibility military invasion or imprisonment by the Federal government.

I've personally not seen any evidence that Delaware's leadership were influenced by what was occurring in Maryland in the period of the secession crisis, I'd appreciate any information you have on this as it is a fascinating topic.
 
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#91
I'm using Maryland as the evidence. Maryland was forced to stay in the Union by threat of military invasion and imprisoned politicians. Delaware and Maryland's decisions were linked. A fact that the Union North was well aware of I'm sure.

Read how Delaware's representatives acted during the War if you want evidence. They were infuriated with the Republicans. Most notebly Senator Willard Saulsbury; however, Senator Bayard felt the same way.
Senators Saulsbury and Bayard were both Democrats, and it's no surprise that with the partisanship of the era, they would be infuriated with Republicans.

But Delaware was not uniformly Democratic. Notably:

a) In 1860, George Fisher won the state-wide election for Delaware's lone seat in the House of Representatives. He was elected on the People's Party ticket, which stood in for the Republicans in Delaware.

b) As noted in historian Patience Essah's book House Divided: Slavery and Emancipation in Delaware, 1638 — 1865 (p 173), "the 1860 campaign in Delaware produced the usual charges and counter charges of election fraud, intimidation, and corruption, but by the final count neither the Democrats nor the Republicans and their allies the People's party had acquired a clear majority in the state legislature... The election produced a stalemate in the legislature."

The point is that Democrats Saulsbury and Bayard did not represent the sentiments of the entire state. By 1860 the state was divided into pro-Democrat and pro-People's/Republican camps, and just about evenly so.

- Alan
 
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Old_Glory

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#92
As noted here:

If so, you or someone should contact the Maryland State archives.
I never said anything about what you posted. Your post seemed to be an attempt to cover up Butler's capture of Baltimore through force. That was not a myth.

Maryland was Delaware's neighbor and any military event that occurred with Maryland had an effect on Delaware.
 



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