The Death of Colonel William B. Goodrich

Andy Cardinal

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William-B.-Goodrich (1).jpg

Colonel William B. Goodrich
The following is extracted from The History of the Sixtieth New York Volunteers:

"Colonel Goodrich anticipated a fight, and seems to have had a presentiment of his fate, the day before the battle of Antietam. While marching the regiment up to join other troops in advance, on the morning of the 16th, he remarked to Acting Sergeant-Major Willson, who was riding by his side, that in the event of a fight it was possible he might be killed, and, writing down the address of his wife, gave it to Willson, with the request that he should telegraph her in the event of his falling, and that, unless his remains should be so badly mutilated as not to be recognized, they might be sent to his,family.

At daylight on the 17th, the troops were awakened by a brisk fire of musketry; and receiving immediate orders to fall in, were soon in the midst of the fight, near the extreme right of the Union line, where through the entire day the results of the engagement were more varied than on any other portion of the field. The rebels had possession of a cornfield, and were fighting desperately to obtain possession of a piece of woods. Colonel Goodrich led the Brigade, and, deploying a portion of his men as skirmishers, held the enemy of check.

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Lester Willson

He was firm, cool, and determined, and encouraged his men to do their best. In a short time he was seen to fall. Willson went immediately to him, and assisted in raising him from the ground. Recovering from the sensation of faintness, he exclaimed, "My God, I am hit!" and sank away unconscious. A rifle ball, probably sent by some sharpshooter who had been on the watch for him, and, from the direction the ball took, had perhaps fired on him from a tree-top, entered his right breast, and, passing down behind the stomach, severed an artery near the intestines.

He was taken to a barn at the rear of the field, where he soon revived. Seeing Willson near him, he smiled, and seemed greatly comforted. As strength would, from time to time, permit, he spoke of his family in most endearing terms, calling them by name, and desiring Willson to take his remains to them. Earnest inquiries were made for the boys in the field, and anxiety was manifest that they should do their duty. Exclaiming "I have always tried to do my duty!" he gently, and without pain, passed from life."

Source: https://books.google.com/books?id=n...sQ6AEwCHoECAcQAg#v=onepage&q=Goodrich&f=false
 
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rpkennedy

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Even before going to war, William Goodrich already had a street named after him in Canton, NY and was one of the leading citizens of the community as well as a 10-year veteran of the militia which is why he was given the rank of lieutenant colonel of the 60th New York Infantry.

Ryan
 

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Not that I disbelieve in having premonitions, I sometimes think unless it is specifically stated as sometimes it is about doom, the person is responsible toward himself, and has an understanding of the dire consequences he must take part in. Equally so concerning present day insurance packages?
Lubliner.
 

rpkennedy

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A couple of news articles follow. The first is from the 19 Sep 1862 Brooklyn Daily Eagle.

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This first article mentions that Colonel Goodrich was commanding the 16th New York instead of the 60th New York. Incidentally, both of those regiments were recruited in the same region of New York (principally St. Lawrence County and the neighboring counties).

The second is from the 20 Sep 1862 Baltimore Sun.

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The "Lieut. Col. Parritson, of the Fifty-seventh New York infantry" referred to here is Lt. Col. Philip J. Parisen who was killed in the vicinity of the Sunken Road at Antietam.

Also, Canton is definitely not in western New York.

Ryan
 
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