The Cost Of Raising A Mystery CS Torpedo Boat To Include The Crew Who Were They?

ucvrelics

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Came across this interesting exchange and invoice for the raising of an unknown CS Torpedo boat in Charleston and the removal of the crew and cleaning of the boat. It raises a few questions. I know that were over 20 of the David class boats built. The salvage company wanted 1/2 of the cost of the boat for their recovery efforts which seems high but I guess raising a boat back then was tough.

Which boat was this?
Who were the crew members who perished?
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photo of a CS David class torpedo boat courtesy of the US Navy

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connecticut yankee

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THE H. L. HUNLEY'S SINKINGS

The First Crew

Michael Cane
Nicholas Davis
Frank Doyle
Charles Hasker (survived)
John Kelly
Lt. John A. Payne (survived)
Absolum Williams
William Robinson (survived)

"The H. L. Hunley arrived in Charleston on August 12th, 1863, accompanied by James McClintock and Gus Whitney, one of the investors in the sub. The crew quickly began testing the Hunley in Charleston Harbor. Frustrated by McClintock’s pace, the Confederates seized the Hunley submarine and turned it over to Lt. John Payne, a Navy man assigned to the CSS Chicora.
On August 29th, the Hunley was moored at Fort Johnson, preparing to depart for its first attack on the blockade when it suddenly sank at the dock. There are conflicting stories of what happened: Some claimed the wake of a passing ship flooded into the Hunley’s open hatches, filling it with enough water to sink it. Others claimed the mooring lines of another ship became tangled on the sub, pulling it onto its side until its hatches were underwater. Whatever happened, the result was the same: the Hunley sank immediately, taking five of her crew down to their deaths. Payne, who was standing atop the sub, jumped into the water and was rescued. William Robinson escaped through the aft hatch and Charles Hasker – trapped by the hatch cover – rode the sub to the bottom before freeing himself and swimming to the surface.
It took weeks to retrieve the submarine..."
 

ucvrelics

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I thought about the Hunley but the time line didn't seem to fit as the date was Nov 1863 on the first invoice.
 

ucvrelics

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Regtl. Quartermaster Shiloh 2020
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THE H. L. HUNLEY'S SINKINGS

The First Crew

Michael Cane
Nicholas Davis
Frank Doyle
Charles Hasker (survived)
John Kelly
Lt. John A. Payne (survived)
Absolum Williams
William Robinson (survived)

"The H. L. Hunley arrived in Charleston on August 12th, 1863, accompanied by James McClintock and Gus Whitney, one of the investors in the sub. The crew quickly began testing the Hunley in Charleston Harbor. Frustrated by McClintock’s pace, the Confederates seized the Hunley submarine and turned it over to Lt. John Payne, a Navy man assigned to the CSS Chicora.
On August 29th, the Hunley was moored at Fort Johnson, preparing to depart for its first attack on the blockade when it suddenly sank at the dock. There are conflicting stories of what happened: Some claimed the wake of a passing ship flooded into the Hunley’s open hatches, filling it with enough water to sink it. Others claimed the mooring lines of another ship became tangled on the sub, pulling it onto its side until its hatches were underwater. Whatever happened, the result was the same: the Hunley sank immediately, taking five of her crew down to their deaths. Payne, who was standing atop the sub, jumped into the water and was rescued. William Robinson escaped through the aft hatch and Charles Hasker – trapped by the hatch cover – rode the sub to the bottom before freeing himself and swimming to the surface.
It took weeks to retrieve the submarine..."
Another issue is the Hunley lost 5 and the invoice is for 4?
 

connecticut yankee

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Jun 2, 2017
Another issue is the Hunley lost 5 and the invoice is for 4?
I erred in saying the three documents reference the first sinking of the Hunley. They actually pertain to the second sinking (Oct. 15) that claimed the life of Horace Huntley and his crew. After this sinking the salvage company Smith and Broadfoot raised the Huntley on Nov. 7th and sent the two documents of Nov. 9th to General Beauregard for pay. The voucher was for $400 for removal of all bodies, not 4. The other document was a joint salvage company and Confederate Navy determination that the salvaged Hunley had a replacement value of which one half was $13,700.
Again, all three documents relate to the Hunley 2nd sinking.
 

redbob

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Hoover, Alabama
I was wondering how a "David" the torpedo boats could sink and trap a crew of four as they were designed with open cockpits and carried a crew of three. A very interesting thread that gives the ole graymatter a workout.
 

redbob

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Thanks. I did a little more digging into this last night and found another invoice dated Sept. So this would have been for rasing the Hunley? Twice
View attachment 354281
I don't remember which of the Hunley's sinking that this pertained to, but when the craft was raised and the bodies were to be removed; they were in such a bad condition that they had to be dismembered to be removed. I would be charging top dollar also.
 

Pete Longstreet

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Location
Hartford, CT
I read that the glass which the commander looked out failed, and had cracked causing the Hunley to sink. Either way... can you imagine volunteering or being ordered to man the Hunley! Those were some brave men.
 

connecticut yankee

First Sergeant
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Thanks. I did a little more digging into this last night and found another invoice dated Sept. So this would have been for rasing the Hunley? Twice
View attachment 354281
Correct. I have seen evidence that it was Smith & Broadfoot, (a big Navy/government contractor) who raised the Hunley TWICE (after the first two sinkings). They apparently from what I've seen on the web received $400 each time for removal of bodies and the "cleaning" (disinfecting). It appears from the documents you cited that for the salvagings themselves Smith & Broadfoot put in for $7000 (Sept) for first sinking that occurred August 29th and $13,700 in Nov. after the second sinking on Oct. 15th.
 

JohnDLittlefield

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Charlestonian displaced to Bodrum,Turkey
For clarity, there were only 10 "Davids" wholly or partially constructed.
The "David" in the first image is known as Knat, a name likley given by Union officers that took the vessel as a prize to New Port, R.I. in the summer of 1865- then the home of the Naval Academy before it moved back to Annapolis. The photo was taken at the Naval Academy in Annapolis.
 
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