The Camden Knights, Co. C, 1st Arkansas Infantry

AUG

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Christopher Scott and Thrower, Camden Knights.jpg

http://museumcatalog.virginiahistor...B&record=9a0c10ad-ce4c-41f1-ab5f-3ea66b3db26e

Quarter-plate ambrotype of Private Christopher C. Scott and Private Christopher Thrower in the early war uniform of the Camden Knights, organized as Company C of the 1st Arkansas Infantry. Photographed by Montgomery P. Simons.

From the collection of the Confederate Memorial Literary Society (Museum of the Confederacy), digitized by the Virginia Historical Society.


Some further info in Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Arkansas in the Civil War by Bobby Leon Roberts and Carl H. Moneyhon:

Christopher C. Scott, a twenty-two-year-old clerk, and Christopher Thrower, a twenty-three-year-old lawyer, joined the Camden Knights in May, 1861, in their home town. Led by Captain William L. Crenshaw, the Knights marched to Pine Bluff and then took a steamer to Little Rock where they joined the First Arkansas Infantry. Thrower served with the unit through all its major battles until the end of the war. Scott served with the unit through the siege at Corinth, then returned to Camden where he helped to organize the Appeal Battery [aka 5th Arkansas Field Battery]. Scott rose to the rank of captain with the battery, was captured with his unit at Vicksburg, then served in the Trans-Mississippi after his parole.​
After the war, Scott returned to Camden where he entered the mercantile business. In 1869 he moved to Arkadelphia and founded the firm of Scott and Company. By 1870 he had joined Smoker Mercantile, and he remained there until about 1895. In the 1870s he helped found the first Episcopal church in Arkadelphia, St. Michael's. When the congregation dwindled, Scott became a Methodist. For years he was a member of the Board of the Arkadelphia School District. He died on June 26, 1920, and was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Arkadelphia.​
"Kit" Thrower returned to Ouachita County after the war and edited a newspaper. In 1873 he was elected to a special session of the General Assembly. He later served two terms in the state senate. In 1877, he moved to Hot Springs where he practiced law and served as a judge. In 1883 he traveled to Little Rock, engaged rooms at the Adams House, and died on March 17, 1883. He was buried at Malvern.​

After a short stint in Virginia in 1861, the 1st Arkansas Infantry went on to serve in the Western Theater from 1862 until the end of the war, mainly as part of Pat Cleburne's Division in the Army of Tennessee.

The Appeal Battery was organized in Memphis, TN, on March 7, 1862, sponsored by the Memphis daily newspaper,The Appeal. Although part of the staff of the The Appeal - ten of the twenty employees - made up part of the battery, Dr. and later Capt. William C. Bryan, editor of the newspaper and organizer of the battery, was said to have gathered a number of recruits from the 1st Arkansas Infantry. Lt. Christopher Scott then went on recruiting duty in Arkansas, returning with about thirty men in May.

The Appeal Battery served in the battles of Corinth and Hatchie Bridge in October 1862, then the Vicksburg Campaign in 1863. A detachment under Lt. Scott manned a 3-inch Ordnance Rifle at the Third Louisiana Redan throughout the siege of Vicksburg, Scott being wounded on June 25, probably in the battle for the crater. The battery was declared exchanged on December 20, 1863 and was reorganized back in Arkansas, with Scott promoted to captain in command. Apparently it didn't see any more action from then on, disbanding at Marshall, TX, with the surrender of the Trans-Mississippi Department in 1865.
 

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View attachment 258787
http://museumcatalog.virginiahistor...B&record=9a0c10ad-ce4c-41f1-ab5f-3ea66b3db26e

Quarter-plate ambrotype of Private Christopher C. Scott and Private Christopher Thrower in the early war uniform of the Camden Knights, organized as Company C of the 1st Arkansas Infantry. Photographed by Montgomery P. Simons.

From the collection of the Confederate Memorial Literary Society (Museum of the Confederacy), digitized by the Virginia Historical Society.


Some further info in Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Arkansas in the Civil War by Bobby Leon Roberts and Carl H. Moneyhon:

Christopher C. Scott, a twenty-two-year-old clerk, and Christopher Thrower, a twenty-three-year-old lawyer, joined the Camden Knights in May, 1861, in their home town. Led by Captain William L. Crenshaw, the Knights marched to Pine Bluff and then took a steamer to Little Rock where they joined the First Arkansas Infantry. Thrower served with the unit through all its major battles until the end of the war. Scott served with the unit through the siege at Corinth, then returned to Camden where he helped to organize the Appeal Battery [aka 5th Arkansas Field Battery]. Scott rose to the rank of captain with the battery, was captured with his unit at Vicksburg, then served in the Trans-Mississippi after his parole.​
After the war, Scott returned to Camden where he entered the mercantile business. In 1869 he moved to Arkadelphia and founded the firm of Scott and Company. By 1870 he had joined Smoker Mercantile, and he remained there until about 1895. In the 1870s he helped found the first Episcopal church in Arkadelphia, St. Michael's. When the congregation dwindled, Scott became a Methodist. For years he was a member of the Board of the Arkadelphia School District. He died on June 26, 1920, and was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Arkadelphia.​
"Kit" Thrower returned to Ouachita County after the war and edited a newspaper. In 1873 he was elected to a special session of the General Assembly. He later served two terms in the state senate. In 1877, he moved to Hot Springs where he practiced law and served as a judge. In 1883 he traveled to Little Rock, engaged rooms at the Adams House, and died on March 17, 1883. He was buried at Malvern.​

After a short stint in Virginia in 1861, the 1st Arkansas Infantry went on to serve in the Western Theater from 1862 until the end of the war, mainly as part of Pat Cleburne's Division in the Army of Tennessee.

The Appeal Battery was organized in Memphis, TN, on March 7, 1862, sponsored by the Memphis daily newspaper,The Appeal. Although part of the staff of the The Appeal - ten of the twenty employees - made up part of the battery, Dr. and later Capt. William C. Bryan, editor of the newspaper and organizer of the battery, was said to have gathered a number of recruits from the 1st Arkansas Infantry. Lt. Christopher Scott then went on recruiting duty in Arkansas, returning with about thirty men in May.

The Appeal Battery served in the battles of Corinth and Hatchie Bridge in October 1862, then the Vicksburg Campaign in 1863. A detachment under Lt. Scott manned a 3-inch Ordnance Rifle at the Third Louisiana Redan throughout the siege of Vicksburg, Scott being wounded on June 25, probably in the battle for the crater. The battery was declared exchanged on December 20, 1863 and was reorganized back in Arkansas, with Scott promoted to captain in command. Apparently it didn't see any more action from then on, disbanding at Marshall, TX, with the surrender of the Trans-Mississippi Department in 1865.
Very nice image
 

JPK Huson 1863

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You see some of the best uniforms in these old photos, thank you!

So many orphaned photos of soldiers from the ACW, always terrific when they can be identified although it really brings it home when you know someone didn't survive the war.
 

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