The brothers Forrest

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larry_cockerham

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While attempting to track the AOT through the latter part of the war, I discovered a most interesting family. While most folks studying the Forrests tend to concentrate on old Bedford, there was much more to this family, a rather remarkeable lot. I'd very much appreciate your allowing me to post some scant data on some other Forrests in the hope that I can gain some more knowledge and weed out the screw-ups if any? Someone wrote on this board recently that the only man that N.B. Forrest was scared of was his brother William Hezikiah Forrest (not to be confused with son William Montgomery Forrest). This is all I have on William Hezekiah. I could use some references for further research if you've stumled across same in your travels. Thanks!

Capt. William Hezekiah Forrest (third son of William and Miriam Beck Forrest): William ran slave businesses in St. Louis, Missouri and Vicksburg, Mississippi, buying slaves from Aaron. Jack Hurst, in his Nathan Bedford Forrest, A Biography wrote: “The day of the last Forrest and Maples sales recorded in the Register’s office, two younger Forrest brothers, William and Aaron, sold an eighteen-year-old slave named Bob for $1050 to Mary C. Temple.” William had a home in Memphis. He joined the Confederate Army on Jun 14, 1861 as a private along with brothers Nathan and Jeffrey. All were to receive considerably more rank as the war progressed.

July 10, 1862

Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest's brigade passed here enroute to its junction with additional units, to be followed by a further advance on the Federal garrison and stores at Murfreesboro. Leaving Chattanooga on July 9, the brigade here consisted of the 8th Texas Cavalry (Wharton), 2nd Georgia Cavalry (Lawton), and Woodward's Kentucky Cavalry Battalion, with a headquarters unit of 20 men, commanded by Captain William Forrest. Further accessions to strength were to join at McMinnville.

William served as a cavalry officer and led the charge against Col. Abel D. Streight’s column at the Battle of Sand Mountain in Days Gap, Alabama where he was wounded April 30, 1863. William skirmished for two miles before he received a ball through his thigh, breaking the bone. Several of his men were lost in this battle. Col. Streight’s men rode mules from their departure from steamships at Eastport, Mississippi. Gen. Nathan B. Forrest captured Streight’s entire command on May 3, 1864 at Cedar Bluff, Alabama near the Georgia state line. William died in Hickman County, Tennessee b. 1825 - d. 1871
 

larry_cockerham

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Here's a little family background information on the Forrests of Marshall County, Tennessee and the list of lesser known Forrest siblings:


William Forrest [Nathan, Shadrack, William, James] was born 6 Jul 1801 in Orange County, North Carolina and died 1837 in Tennessee. When he was eight years old, the family moved north of the Cumberland River not far from Gallatin and two years later in 1808 settled in Duck River in what was then Bedford, now Marshall County, Tennessee. William was a blacksmith by trade and married pretty Miss Miriam Beck who is described as 6 feet tall, 180 pounds. (obviously a hunk of woman) Miriam was of Scottish extraction, her parents having relocated from South Carolina and settled in 1796 near what is now Caney Springs, near Duck River in middle Tennessee. Of the eleven children of William and Miriam, the first was named Nathan Bedford Forrest, the object of our chat. In 1837 William died leaving Nathan the head of the family of his mother, 6 brothers and 3 sisters. Four months after his death, Jeffrey, a posthumous child was born. Six years later, Miriam married Joseph Luxton ca 1843 and to them were born children, 3 boys and 1 girl.


Children of William Forrest and Miriam Beck are:

Nathan Bedford Forrest 13 Jul 1821- 29 Oct 1877

Frances Forrest b. 13 Jul 1821 d. 1841

John Forrest b. 1822 d. 1876 Dresden, Marshall Co., TN

Capt. William Hezekiah Forrest b. 1825 d. 1871 (see later)

Capt. Aaron Forrest b. 1828 Bedford Co. TN d. 1864 Dresden, TN (see later)

Lt. Col. Jeffrey E. Forrest b. Salem, MS 1837 d. 22 Feb 1864 Okolona, Mississippi m. Mary Dyche. Jeffrey was an owner or sales agent of slaves in Memphis.

Lt. Col. Jesse Anderson Forrest b. 8 Apr 1829 d. 14 Dec 1890 m. Sarah Mayberry (parents of Sally Forrest b. 14 Mar 1876) Jesse was an owner or sales agents of slaves in Memphis.

Isaac Forrest, b. 1834 died young

Bedford Forrest b. 1834

Mary Forrest, b. 1826 died young >1837

Milly Forrest b. 1831 died young > 1837
 

larry_cockerham

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the girls and John Forrest

Information on the other children of William and Miriam Beck Forrest:

All daughters of William and Miriam died early in life. By 1898 all of the sons of William and Miriam Beck Forrest were deceased.

John Forrest (second son) served in the Mexican War and was shot and paralyzed. He was a gambler who worked as jailer and clerk for brother Bedford. He resided in Memphis, Tenn. at Worsham House in 1862.

Always looking for more on this man?
 
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larry_cockerham

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Aaron Forrest

Capt. Aaron Forrest (fourth son):

He was a partner with his brothers in the slave trade. He owned A.H. Forrest and Company in Vicksburg, Mississippi in 1858. Sales stopped in 1860. Researcher Stewart Cruickshank in 2006 has found Aaron as a Captain in the 6th Mississippi Battalion of State Troops. He commanded an operation near Paducah, Kentucky in the spring of 1864 when he was taken ill with pneumonia and died in Dresden, Tennessee. Jack Hurst wrote: “Lt. Col. A. H. Forrest “ is on the Yazoo River with one regiment fighting gunboats and transports”. Stewart is still looking for confirmation of the Lt. Col. rank.

I found this reference to A.H. Forrest in 2006:

HARTFORD CITY was a small river steamer built at McKeesport, Pa., in 1856 and first homeported at Cincinnati, Ohio. In May 1862 she was impressed into Confederate service out of Vicksburg, Miss., to tow rafts and other craft for obstruction of Union gunboat navigation in the Yazoo River. She later transported supplies out of that same Confederate base, but sought refuge in the Yalobusha in July 1863 as the Federal fleet took over control of the Yazoo. On 18 July 1863 Capt. A. H. Forrest, CSA, at Carrollton, Miss., was ordered to send a detachment to burn the steamboats including HARTFORD CITY, said to be located in the Tallahatchie and Yazoo Rivers.
 

larry_cockerham

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More on Aaron Forrest

Forrest’s Battalion State Troops Cavalry, aka 6th Battalion State Troops Cavalry

(from Dunbar Rowland’s "Military History of Mississippi, 1803-1898"; company listing courtesy of H. Grady Howell’s "For Dixie Land, I’ll Take My Stand’)

"Sixth Battalion Mississippi State troops, Capt. A.H. Forrest, near Carrollton, 150 men." General Chalmers’ report at the time of the Federal raid to Grenada, August, 1863. Capt. Forrest was captain of the Sunflower Rangers independent cavalry company. Other companies constituting this battalion have not been identified.

One extract from the Official Records of the War of Northern Aggression:

"HDQRS. FIFTH MIL. DIST., DEPT. MISS. AND E. LA.,
Grenada, July 18, 1863.

Capt. A. H. FORREST, Comdg. Battalion, Carrollton, Miss.:
CAPTAIN: The brigadier-general commanding directs me to say, in reply to your note of yesterday, that you will send a detachment to burn the steamboats Hope, Hartford City, Cotton Plant, and any others <ar38_1017> that may be in the Tallahatchee and Yazoo Rivers. You will also send out detachments southwest and east of you, with orders to burn all cotton, whether belonging to the Government or individuals, leaving the owners only sufficient for the use of their own families. They will commence by burning that nearest the enemy. The enemy are reported to be within 7 miles of Vaughan's Station, and advancing in this direction. You will throw out scouts to observe their movements, and will report them promptly to these headquarters. It is desired that only such cattle as are suitable for beef should be driven out of the bottom.

Your obedient servant, W.A. Goodman , Assistant Adjutant-General."

Stewart Cruickshank in 2006 wrote:

“The story goes that Aaron Forrest died of pneumonia in Dresden the county seat of Weakley County, TN. The DAR Cemetery books of Weakley county have listings of all the burials in Weakley county that have markers. There are only 3 Forrest's buried in Weakley County thru 1978 and Aaron is not listed.”

The following is a Union report from the Tennessee Civil War Sourcebook; (supplied by Joe Stout 2006)

(ca. April 13, 1864 - April 15, 1864 - Scout from Jackson to
Dresden toColumbus, Kentucky

HDQRS. OF THE POST, Columbus, Ky., April 15, 1864.
Capt. J. H. ODLIN, Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Cairo, Ill.:

CAPT.: I have a scout just in from Jackson, Dresden, and that line, and I have every reason to believe his reports reliable. He was employed by Gen.Smith and Col. Waring. He reports as follows: Gen. Forrest has two divisions-First Division, 3,400 strong, which is concentrated at Jackson, Tenn.; Second Division, 2,000 strong, concentrated at Dresden; 1,000 under Duckworth, from Jackson's command. Forrest said that a large force of our troops had landed at Pittsburg Landing, and that he was going to drive them back and across into North Alabama. The Second Division is said to be about to cross at the mouth of the Big Sandy into Middle Tennessee. My scout thinks their object is to get behind Chattanooga, somewhere about Winchester. Col. Aaron Forrest, brother of the general, died at Jackson on Thursday night last. Gen.'s Fitzhugh [Stephan D.?] Lee and Jackson, with 9,000 men, are reported near Memphis. I shall try and rebuild the telegraph between us to-morrow. All the small squads are ordered to join their commands immediately at Dresden, under Gen. Buford, who is on
his march there. I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. HUDSON LAWRENCE, Col., Cmdg. Post.
OR, Ser. I, Vol. 32, pt. III, p. 374. )

It may be that he died in Dresden and the body was taken to Jackson, TN or possibly he may have died in Jackson and not Dresden. This is a Union report so he would probably not have first hand knowledge.
 

larry_cockerham

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Lt. Colonel Jesse Anderson Forrest

Jesse Anderson Forrest (fifth son) b. 8 Apr 1829 Chapel Hill, TN d. 14 Dec 1890: Lt. Colonel of 20th Tennessee CSA Regiment. On March 10, 1862 he took command of Co. D in Huntsville, Alabama. He was reported in Ripley, Mississippi 23 Jun 1864. He was in Florence, AL on 21 Sep 1864 with the 20th TN before being wounded in Athens, Alabama siege 23/24 Sep 1864. He was in command of a bold attack on the steamer Belle of Saint Louis near Fort Randolph, Tennessee 27 Oct 1864. He served with the Army of Tennessee during the Tennessee Campaign and helped fight the rear guard on the escape from Nashville. He was paroled with his regiment at Gainesville, Alabama in May 1865. He was running a livery stable in Memphis Oct 2, 1877 as per Jack Hurst.
 
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larry_cockerham

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Col. Jeffrey Forrest

Jeffrey E. Forrest (sixth son):

He managed a livery stable in Memphis when the war began. On 11 Mar 1862 he was elected Captain of Co. C of the 7th TN Cavalry. He was in the center of action at the Battle of Ft. Donalson 13 Feb 1862.

The following was published in Jordan and Pryor’s The Campaign of Lt. Gen. N.B. Forrest and Forrest’s Cavalry: in battle at Fort Donelson at Dover “ several of Forrest’s best men fell in this affair and his brother, Lieutenant Jeffrey Forrest, at the lead of the squadron, having his horse hot under him, received a painful contusion by the fall, but nevertheless, kept the field to the last, severely as he suffered”. Jeffrey was shot through both thighs on Oct 1863 at Bears Creek, Mississippi. Jeffrey was ordered to West Point, Mississippi on Feb 4, 1864.

Colonel of the 8th Tennessee Cavalry, he commanded a Brigade in his brother Nathan's division at the Battle of Okalona, Mississippi 22 Feb 1864 and was shot through the neck and died when leading the charge. Born 10 Jun 1838 d. 22 Feb 1864 He was re-interred in Elmwood Cemetery in Memphis in 1868. Jeffrey was born four months after his father’s death and was essentially raised by his brother Nathan.
 

larry_cockerham

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More on Jeffrey Forrest

From the history of the 2nd Missouri Cavalry:

In the same battle (Okalona), General Forrest ordered Colonels McCulloch's and Jeffery Forrest's (the Generals youngest brother) brigades to make an assault on the Union line. Colonel McCulloch was wounded in the hand and Colonel Forrest was killed with a bullet to his neck. Saddened and angered by his brother's death, Forrest and his escort charged the Yankee line. And Colonel McCulloch, seeing the danger coming upon his General, rallied the troopers near him as he waved his bloody hand in the air calling to his men, "My God, men, will you see them kill your General?" McCulloch and his men broke up the melee, but not before Forrest had personally killed three Federal troopers with his slashing sword. It is also known that the 2nd Missouri Cavalry served as General Forrest personal bodyguard. Upon being promoted to brigade commander, the regiment was then led by his cousin Lieutenant Colonel Robert A. McCulloch for the remainder of the war. Colonel McCulloch also served as the Division Commander in Forrest's Cavalry Corps whenever Brigadier General Chalmers was unable to command.

Forrest's Cavalry Regiment, also known as the 4th Alabama Cavalry Regiment, was organized with Julian's Cavalry Battalion as a nucleus on the 1st of June 1863. It was broken up on 11 July 1864 when four Tennessee companies were transferred to the 18th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment; four Alabama companies transferred to Warren's Cavalry Battalion; and one Alabama Company transferred to Moreland's Cavalry Battalion (Fancher's Company, subsequently Co. "E", Moreland's Regiment). Officers: Col. Jeffrey E. Forrest; Lt. Col. Dew Moore Wisdom; Adj. D. H. Halsey.
 

larry_cockerham

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If there's an American family who put more of their energy, personal fortune and blood into the Civil War, I'd like to hear or read about 'em. Whether you agree with their personal characteristics, traits, or political beliefs, seems to me the Forrest brothers at least deserve a salute for their sticking to personal convictions. Any additions, corrections or suggestions for further information on these guys will be greatly appreciated. Thanks. The Forrest Boyhood Home near Chapel Hill, Tennessee is rapidly nearing restoration. Owned by the Sons of Conferate Veterans, it is a worthy candidate for your contributions and is certainly a place that produced a family of warriors.
 
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ole

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larry_cockerham said:
If there's an American family who put more of their energy, personal fortune and blood into the Civil War, I'd like to hear or read about 'em. Whether you agree with their personal characterists, traits, or political beliefs, seems to me the Forrest brothers at least deserve a salute for their sticking to personal conviction. Any additions, corrections or suggestions for further information on these guys will be greatly appreciated. Thanks. The Forrest Boyhood Home near Chapel Hill, Tennessee is rapidly nearing restoration. Owned by the Sons of Conferate Veterans, it is a worthy candidate for your contributions and is certainly a place that produced a family of warriors.
And with that worthy endeavor, Mr. Cockerham, sir, I'll take it to heart and think about it some. Results pending. You made one heckuva good picture of NBF and I'm bound to study up some on what you've said.
 

larry_cockerham

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The brothers and sisters Forrest

We (the SCV) continue to work on restoration efforts for the Forrest family home located just west of Chapel Hill, Tennessee in Marshall County. While most folks associated this home with the more famous General, it was obviously occupied by a very large family including brothers who became Confederate colonels, captain and warriors in their own right.

Nathan Bedford and Frances Forrest born 13 Jul 1821 are believed to have entered this world somewhere near Holt’s Corner on the north side of present–day Chapel Hill, Tennessee in Bedford County, now Marshall County.

In 1824 when the twins were about 3 years old, William and Meriam Forrest moved their family to a small cabin and farm west of Chapel Hill on present-day Pyles Road. They remained at this location, now being restored as the Forrest Boyhood Home by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. It was home to probably seven of the Forrest children. Brothers Isaac and Bedford who both died young were born about the time of departure 1834 for a little community known as Salem in western Tippah County (now Benton) Mississippi. Ashland, Mississippi is very close to the location of the form community of Salem and became the county seat of Benton County when it was formed in 1837 three years after the arrival of the Forrest family. Sadly William Forrest passed away that year and sixteen year-old Nathan Bedford became the breadwinner and leader of his small army of siblings. In 1842, still supporting the family to a large extent, Nathan moved to Hernando, Mississippi and married Mary Montgomery in 1845.

The residency by the Forrest Family on Pyles Road extended roughly between 1824 and 1834, a ten year period filled with the patter or many little and larger feet! The simple chart below with ages of the children will give an idea of the occupants at a given year.

1824 - Nathan 3, Frances 3, John 2
1830 - Nathan 9, Frances 9, John 8, William 5, Mary 4, Aaron 2

1835 – Nathan 14, Frances 14, John 13, William 10, Mary 9, Aaron 7, Milly 4, Bedford 1, Isaac 1

(Not sure where Bedford and Issac were born, but probably Mississippi). Col. Jeffrey Forrest was born in Tippah County, Mississippi in 1837.
 

samgrant

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Larry, You know so much about Forrest it's unbelievable. Are you going to write a book?

Also, as you seem to know alot about North Carolina in the war, I'd like to know what you might know about this Henry Berry Lowry (Lowrie) and the "Lowry Wars" of which I have just recently become aware of.
 
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larry_cockerham

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As for the 'book', TWO ARMIES ON THE SAME ROAD, some of which you've been reading in my chronology notes. I'm about three years into it, tracking a Confederate and Union ancestor through north Alabama and Tennessee with the 63rd VA / AOT and the 4th US Cav. Forrest vs Hatch for the most part. Still a bit of a work in progress, though I've picked up a Grandson's ancestor who was with the 41st TN in Cheatham's Corps. They (the 41st) received some less than desirable battle assignments at Franklin and Nashville, so this story may expand a bit. I've been away from North Carolina since 1978 so my memory is a bit fuzzy. Without doing some googling, seems like old Henry was a renegade of some sort? The Lowrey name suggest he might have been a Lumbee from the Fayetteville area? I guess my immediate answer to your question would be no, but I'll check? My own NC ancestors were 5th NC Cav CSA, captured and sent north to prison, 37th NC deserted soon as possible (very large family) and 10th US Cav who is in the book. Couple of my TN and VA ancestors were in the ANV along with two of wife's AL and GA boys, but no memory of Lowrey in the northern Virginia campaigns. I'm thinking he stayed in NC? I would have heard of him from Raleigh, probably from a Lumbee friend who now lives in Henderson, NC? The Lumbees have been trying to attain native American status for years on the story that they were the folks who captured/saved the Walter Raleigh led colony in the late 1500s.
 

larry_cockerham

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Forrest family fundraiser

Folks, please bring your yankee dollars and your good cheer to the annual fundraiser for the Forrest Boyhood home on Pyles Road just west of Chapel Hill, Tennessee this Saturday, June 23 all day. Great food, mounted re-enactors, prizes and opportunities to purchase keepsakes of untold value! Renovation of this museum and showplace takes continuing funding. The barn is next! I hope to see you there!!!

Where else can you visit a home that witnessed a lieutenant general, captain and two colonels playing in the front yard?
 

richard

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I sure hope that you southern boys know how to post signs to the site and state the hours that you will be there. I would hate to drive the 300 miles and miss a turn in the road.
 
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larry_cockerham

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Draft of an article

Any corrections to this draft will be greatly appreciated!


The Forrest Boyhood Home should be renamed? Perhaps the Forrest Girlhood Home or simply the Forrest Home? Many of us jump to the conclusion that this place in Marshall County, Tennessee was just the home of Lt. General Nathan Bedford Forrest. That it was, but only until he was a lad of about 13. This small farm was also the home of probably seven Forrest siblings, all the children of William Forrest and Miriam Beck Forrest.

William was a blacksmith, one of the first to enter middle Tennessee. Born in Orange County, North Carolina 6 Jul 1801 he moved with his parents to the Cumberland River valley near Gallatin, Tennessee in 1809 where they remained for about two years before moving to the Duck River area of what was then Bedford County. William married Miriam Beck about 1820 in Bedford County. She was the daughter of Scotish parents who had moved to Caney Springs in 1796 from South Carolina. The young couple made their home briefly in the little community of Chapel Hill near Holts Crossing on the north side of present-day Chapel Hill. It was in this little town that their first children, twins Nathan Bedford and Frances were born on 13 July 1821.

By 1823 a move was made westward a couple of miles to the existing home on Pyles Road. There has been speculation that the small cabin in which the twins were born may have also made the trek west and become the one-story room that is the western portion of the present building. Further analysis of the logs in the old barn on the property may prove that this barn was built or at least used by William Forrest to operate his blacksmith business or at least shelter some horses. It’s obvious from the very firm soil around the Forrest Home that farming would have been a secondary occupation at best. The large stream a couple of miles south was completely dry during the weekend of the recent June fundraiser. Crops or large herds of animals would have suffered in this climate.

As William and Miriam Forrest and twins Nathan Bedford and Frances moved into their new home, William quickly went to work building his business and his family. Many famous Forrests were born at the Pyles Road residence and spent most of their childhood there.

Son John Forrest arrived in 1822. He was to serve has nation in the Mexican war where he was paralyzed in his legs. He became a gambler in Memphis and worked as a jailer and clerked for his brother Bedford. John Forrest died in 1876 near Dresden, Tennessee? He claimed the Pyles Road residence as his boyhood home for about twelve years.

Son William Hezekiah Forrest arrived in this world in 1825. His claim to the residence as his boyhood home covered nine years. William as an adult ran slave businesses in St. Louis and Vicksburg, buying slaves from brother Aaron before resale. Their company was called Forrest and Maples. William had a home in Memphis and joined the Confederate Army 13 Jul 1861, rising to the rank of Captain. He was wounded 30 Apr 1863 in a charge against Col. Abel D. Streight at the battle of Sand Mountain in Days Gap, Alabama. William died in 1871.

Daughter Mary Forrest was born in 1826. She died at a relatively young age sometime after 1837. Her stay at the Pyles Road residence would have covered about eight years, making her claim to a Girlhood Home!

Son Aaron Forrest was born in 1828. He claimed the boyhood home for six years! He owned A.H. Forrest and Company in Vicksburg, Mississippi by 1858, having worked with his brothers in the slave trade. The business closed about 1860. He served the CSA as Captain of the 6th Mississippi Battalion of State Troops. He became ill with pneumonia while commanding an expedition near Paducah, Kentucky in the spring of 1864 and died near Dresden, Tennessee.

Son Jesse Anderson Forrest came into the world 8 Apr 1829. His claim to the boyhood home lasted for about five years! Before the war, he was in the slave trade with his brothers in Memphis. Jesse was Lt. Colonel of the 20th Tennessee Regiment. He served vallantly in Mississippi before joining the AOT in the Tennessee campaign and helping to fight the rear guard action on the retreat. After the war, he ran a livery stable in Memphis for several years. He died 14 Dec 1890 leaving a daughter Sally.

Daughter Milly Forrest was born about 1831 and died young after 1837. Another claim to a girlhood home, she would have lived there about three years!

Twin Sons Isaac Forrest and Bedford Forrest were born about 1834. This is near the time of the family’s move to Mississippi. The twins died at a young age. It may be these two boys who are buried at the Pyles Road residence. More research is needed.

From their porch on Pyles Road, William and Miriam Forrest could have seen a Mexican War soldier, two future Captains, a future Lt. Colonel, and a future Lt. General at play in the rocky yard. In 1834, the family pulled up stakes and moved westward to better land in west Tippah County, Mississippi in a little community, now extinct, that was incorporated as the town of Salem on 11 May 1837.

A son Jeffrey E. Forrest, who was to die in his brother Nathan’s arms after being wounded at the battle of Okalona, Mississippi 22 Feb 1864, was born in Salem in 1837, just four months after the untimely death of his father, William. He managed a livery stable in Memphis prior to the war. Jeffrey was a Captain of the 7th Tennessee at Ft. Donalson. and was Colonel of the 8th Tennessee Cavalry. He was shot through both thighs at Bears Creek, Mississippi Oct 1863.

The Forrest family was a remarkable, tough part of the history of Tennessee and Mississippi who gave far more than their share of blood and effort in the American Civil War.
 
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Larry

TY so much for that info...next to my boy Custer, NBF is my 2nd most researched personality. I knew some of the things of his brothers, but you definitly enlightened me to more! Well done! Leigh aka Custersluck13
 

larry_cockerham

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A different side of the general....

From Michael Bradley's FORREST'S ESCORT AND STAFF

Charles Anderson wrote this account of a visit to the general in 1877:

"When the stage arrived, I found the General waiting for me. As I waited for ladies to alight, Gen. Forrest went to the opposite side of the coach, gave me a heartly handshake, and expressed his pleasure at my visit. There was a mildness in his manner, a softness of expression, and a gentleness in his words that appeared to me strange and unnatural. At first I thought his bad health had brought about this change, but when I remembered that when sick or wounded he was the most restless and impatient man I ever saw.

Soon I told him that there was something about him that I couldn't understand, the he didn't appear to me to be the same man I used to know so well. He was silent for a moment, then seemed to divine my trouble, and halting suddenly, he took hold of the lapel of my coat and turned me squarely in front of him, and raising his right hand with that long index finger (his emphasizer) extended, he said, "Major, I am not the man you were with so long and knew so well - I hope I am a better man. I've joined the Church and am trying to live a Christian life." Said I, "General, that's it, and you are indebted to 'Old Mistess' (as we called Mrs. Forrest), and to no one else, for this great change." "Yes, you are right." he replied, "Mary had prayed for me night and day for many years, and I feel now that through her prayers my life has been spared, and to them am I indebted for passing safely through so many dangers." (CV 5:387).

The power of prayer?
 
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Susan Sweet

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Lowry Wars

Sam there is a book called Between Two Fires: American Indians in the Civil War . It has a chapter on the Lowry Wars Author is Hauptman .

Susan
 
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