The Beginnings of the Irish Brigade

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Hussar Yeomanry

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corcoran.jpg

Colonel Corcoran in what is believed to be his 69th New York State Militia uniform.


It being St Patrick's Day this month I thought I would look at it's predecessor for while such a fabled organisation wasn't at First Bull Run there is a definite link to the battle.

This is of course the 90 day men of the 69th New York State Militia. (Originally New York's 2nd Regiment of Irish Volunteers)

Many (possibly most?) of whom will reenlist in the fabled 69th New York Volunteers of The Irish Brigade and which will (eventually) go on to become a regiment in the current New York National Guard.


So, the 69th New York State Militia is mustered in to Federal Service on the 4th May 1861 in direct response to President Lincoln's call for 75,000 volunteers on April 15th for the regiment had been already begun to form over two weeks earlier with all but one of the individual companies (and the 'Corps Engineers') forming in to State Service on the 20th April. The last remaining company (K) forms on the 22nd. Of these three have a distinct identity with Company A being the Irish Fusiliers (Sometimes known as the National Cadets), Company G being the Mechanics Guards and Company K being The Irish or Meagher's Zouaves.

Its commander is the colorful Colonel Michael Corcoran who had taken charge in August 1859. Born in County Sligo, Ireland initially he appears loyal to the British but this quickly changes after some service in the Revenue Police. Certainly by the time he has arrived in New York City (as a tavern clerk) he is involved in Irish Nationalism and soon becomes deeply involved in Democratic politics at Tammany Hall. Interestingly he was at the outbreak of war facing a court martial for refusing to parade the regiment for the Prince of Wales' visit in 1859. These charges are quickly dropped and eventually he will become a Brigadier General (mostly due to the number of Irish men he will recruit) before his untimely demise in 1863.

Its Lieutenant Colonel will initially be Robert Nugent formerly of County Down, Ireland. However he misses the battle due to having broken his shoulder when he fell off his horse in June. He does however once he recovers go on to command the later 69th New York Volunteers and indeed The Irish Brigade and will later become a Brigadier General.

In the immediate run up to the battle Captain J Haggerty formerly of Company A is appointed acting Lieutenant Colonel and Captain. He does not survive the battle.

Its Major is A. J. Bagley but according to one source he remains in New York (reason not stated). Alternatively is this the same as Lieutenant Bagley (no first name given in Sherman's OR) who is on W. T. Sherman's staff during the battle. Sherman is their future brigade commander and perhaps Major is only a Militia rank. If not that then they are related I would guess. Whatever, according to Sherman this Lieutenant Bagley requests and receives permission to fight with his company in the 69th and was lightly wounded and captured. [As possible supporting evidence I have found a special order ordering the Major to accompany the 69th to Washington DC. Whether he does or not is another matter]

Similarly during or in the immediate run up to the battle Captain Thomas Francis Meagher of Company K (born in County Waterford) is appointed acting Major and Captain. This ardent nationalist will rise to the rank of Brigadier General though there are (unsubstantiated) allegations that at First Bull Run he was drunk. For more information on Meagher I suggest the excellent: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/irish-revolutionist-–-thomas-francis-meagher.155618/


The Company Commanders will be:

A: (Irish Fusiliers) Captain J Haggerty and then Lieutenant T. Kelly is appointed Lieutenant and acting Captain upon the promotion of Captain Haggerty.

B: Officially Captain T. Lynch but during the battle it will actually be commanded by Lieutenant and acting Captain W. M. Giles. (I have not been able to determine why Captain Lynch was not in command)

C: Captain J Cavanagh. From Tipperary. Later Major in the 69th New York Volunteers.

D: Captain T. Clarke.

E: Captain P. Kelly (Possibly this is the future commander of the Irish Brigade Colonel Patrick Kelly but it is a common name in the regiment and I have no corroborative evidence)

F: Captain J. Breslin until 4 days before the battle when he is accidentally severely wounded in the right shoulder (method of injury unknown). Lieutenant and acting Captain P. Duffy will command during the battle.

G: (Mechanics Guard) Certainly initially commanded by Captain Felix Duffy (A highly thought of Mexican War veteran). Reports then differ. One suggests that by the battle Lieutenant and acting Captain W. Butler was in command of the company for while the regiment was in Washington DC Duffy resigned his commission. The other suggests Duffy commanded the company and was wounded in the right hand during the battle. As yet I have been unable to divine the truth though I would tentatively suggest that he did not resign his commission. Whatever, he seems to have later commanded Company G of the 69th New York Volunteers until he was killed at Antietam where he was acting Major of the Regiment.

H: Captain James Kelly. He takes command after the battle and writes the regiment's Official Report after the battle. Will later command the Regiment though there is a question about him. Some reports suggest that technically he is still an officer of the 16th US Infantry and that either he hasn't resigned or that he tried but it was not accepted. Whatever, he seems to be AWOL from the 16th US during the battle. This won't hurt his later career (due to W. T. Sherman's intervention) and he will rise to at least the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

EDIT - see below for details of Company I!

J EDIT - That should be a K: (Irish or Meagher's Zouaves – names seemingly used interchangeably) Initially Captain Thomas F Meagher but after his promotion Lieutenant and acting Captain E.K Butler.

'Corps Engineers': Captain J Quinlan (apparently with Captain J. B Kirker as supernumary Captain)


The Regiments strength will be variously stated.

Supposedly on the 12th April (prior to Lincoln's call) the various parts of the regiment had only 245 men on its muster rolls. This quickly swells to 1,000 almost entirely Irish men within a few days (according to one source).
However newspaper reports beg to differ. One dated 1st May suggest they are 1,250 strong while two both dated 4th May suggest 1,450 or 1,100 men. This is while the Regiment is in DC.
Kelly in his OR again states they had '1000 muskets' during the battle which seems a rather 'convenient' number but gives us some idea of their sizable pre battle strength.


To the battle itself:

The 69th will be one of the first regiments sent to Washington DC (in response to the panic about Confederate invasion and possibly minus Company K – who may not arrive until early May – reports differ). They will travel on the steamer James Adger, the 8th and 13th New York accompanying them on other vessels and they arrived either late on the 25th or early on the 26th April. In Washington DC they will initially be billeted in the grounds of Georgetown College. From there they move to Georgetown Heights. After that they will go on to create Camp (Later Fort) Corcoran (named after their Colonel) in Arlington to guard the southern end of the Aqueduct Bridge.

Initially assigned to Colonel Hunter's command they will then find themselves in a brigade commanded by none other than then Colonel William T. Sherman. The rest of the brigade is the 13th New York (Brooklyn) and 79th New York (Highlanders) as well as the 2nd Wisconsin who will go on to fame and legend as part of The Iron Brigade.

This Brigade will be the third of four in Daniel Tyler's 1st Division and on the 21st July 1861 (The day of battle) the brigade leaves camp at Centreville at 2.30 A.M and a deeply confused march follows with an average speed of at most one mile an hour. Finally in position near the Stone Bridge by 10 A.M it is then that Sherman spots troops moving to his right. To counter this the 69th are shifted to the right of the brigade though he does nothing else until Hunter's Division crosses at Suddley Springs. Then when he hears firing as ordered he crosses at a ford that he alone has observed and that is not defended with the 69th in the lead of the brigade.

It is as they are advancing cautiously that they encounter a group of retreating enemy (in some reports said to be Louisiana Zouaves – in other words Wheat's First Louisiana Special Battalion), a brief firefight ensued and it was then that acting Lieutenant Colonel Haggarty is killed. Sometime around then there is something that does not make the Official Report. Apparently the 69th somehow gets confused and almost opens up on the gray clad 13th New York of their own brigade. Then after this the brigade sorts itself out and takes position initially behind Porter's brigade of Hunter's Division. This does not appear to last long and the 69th will soon find itself tangling with the 4th Alabama of Bee's Brigade. This is a hard fight but the 69th appear to prevail amidst much confusion. However they will be unable to do much else for it looks like Imboden's well placed 4 x 6pdr smoothbores take a horrible toll on the regiment when it attempts to advance. Then the rest of the army collapses.

Corcoran claims they made it off the field pretty much as a formed unit (before he is captured by Confederate Cavalry) but this seems... unlikely.

Indeed it looks like it would be more accurate to say that it is the following day back at Camp Corcoran before the regiment re-forms for the battle will not have been a good one for the 69th.


Colonel Corcoran was lightly wounded and captured. Acting Lieutenant Colonel Haggerty was one of the first to fall (as per both the OR and private correspondence from Colonel Corcoran).

These are far from the only casualties.

37 more men are killed as well as 58 more wounded while 2 more officers and 93 men will be missing. All told they will lose very nearly 200 of their number as well as one of their two battle flags (Their National Colors). Oddly now Acting Colonel and Captain James Kelly will be the man to actually take command of the regiment and make the Official Report for the 69th rather than acting Major Meagher who is the senior surviving officer. Then again Kelly is (was?) a Regular Officer therefore perhaps he understands better what is desired by Headquarters. Alternatively maybe there are truth to the rumors that Meagher really was drunk...

The regiment was in the immediate aftermath of the battle whisked back to New York City so it could after a 'heroic' march through the streets by apparently half naked troops be mustered out on the 25th (This is but 4 days after the battle).

It says something about them that a sizable number immediately reform as the fabled 69th New York Volunteers.


SOURCES: Primarily as follows: William T. Sherman's long and tortuous Official Report (crystal clear in places, as clear as particularly dense mud in others and with curious omissions), Captain Kelly's concise and easily comprehensible Official Report, www.firstbullrun.co.uk mostly for newspaper reports, http://www.69thnewyork.co.uk/69history1861.htm mostly for information on the officers and https://bullrunnings.wordpress.com for a couple of Personal Accounts from the Regiment.
 
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luinrina

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Wonderful post, @Hussar Yeomanry ! Very detailed. Thanks to your description of the regiment's command structure you cleared a misunderstanding I had without noticing when writing Meagher's biography. Loved your source description. :D
William T. Sherman's long and tortuous Official Report (crystal clear in places, as clear as particularly dense mud in others and with curious omissions)
:rofl:

Company K being The Irish or Meagher's Zouaves.
Captain Thomas Francis Meagher of Company K
J: (Irish or Meagher's Zouaves
I couldn't help but notice this small irregularity. Was Meagher's company K or J? Also, you listed only 9 companies - was the regiment not full strength?
 

Hussar Yeomanry

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Wonderful post, @Hussar Yeomanry ! Very detailed. Thanks to your description of the regiment's command structure you cleared a misunderstanding I had without noticing when writing Meagher's biography. Loved your source description. :D

:rofl:

I couldn't help but notice this small irregularity. Was Meagher's company K or J? Also, you listed only 9 companies - was the regiment not full strength?
Firstly I did indeed get increasingly annoyed with Sherman's Official Report. In places it's great and then you get to the latter stages of the battle and I don't know. It's not badly written it's just... odd...

Meagher's/ the Irish Zouaves was Company K. Stupid typo. [And increasingly I am finding suggestions (and suggestions only) that Company K seems to have a semi independent existence away from the rest of the 69th in as much as whenever a company needs to be detached it is always Company K]

Also I appear to have deleted Company I from the Company List :redface:

Their information is as follows:

Formed 20th April, Mustered in to service with the rest of the regiment. As of the 22nd April their Captain is J P McIvor. He however does not appear to accompany the regiment to Washington DC. Instead for a time the Company is commanded by 1st Lieutenant J Coonan. However by the time of the battle J. P. McIvor has rejoined his company. He will be captured during (or more probably in the immediate aftermath of) the battle.


I have also since discovered a small point. During at least some of their time in Washington they were joined by ten West Point cadets who drilled them for 'seven hours a day'. How effective having 10 men trying to train 750+ raw recruits and 250 at best semi trained men (likely somewhat trained in drill but with no musketry training) is in my mind questionable.
 
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Hussar Yeomanry

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Company E's Patrick Kelly is the same Patrick Kelly who would command the 88th New York and then the Irish Brigade after Meagher's resignation. He was killed in one of the early assaults at Petersburg.

Ryan
Ah. I guessed he was but could not prove it. Therefore I noted my thoughts but nothing more.

Thank you for the confirmation.
 

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View attachment 295946
Colonel Corcoran in what is believed to be his 69th New York State Militia uniform.


It being St Patrick's Day this month I thought I would look at it's predecessor for while such a fabled organisation wasn't at First Bull Run there is a definite link to the battle.

This is of course the 90 day men of the 69th New York State Militia. (Originally New York's 2nd Regiment of Irish Volunteers)

Many (possibly most?) of whom will reenlist in the fabled 69th New York Volunteers of The Irish Brigade and which will (eventually) go on to become a regiment in the current New York National Guard.


So, the 69th New York State Militia is mustered in to Federal Service on the 4th May 1861 in direct response to President Lincoln's call for 75,000 volunteers on April 15th for the regiment had been already begun to form over two weeks earlier with all but one of the individual companies (and the 'Corps Engineers') forming in to State Service on the 20th April. The last remaining company (K) forms on the 22nd. Of these three have a distinct identity with Company A being the Irish Fusiliers (Sometimes known as the National Cadets), Company G being the Mechanics Guards and Company K being The Irish or Meagher's Zouaves.

Its commander is the colorful Colonel Michael Corcoran who had taken charge in August 1859. Born in County Sligo, Ireland initially he appears loyal to the British but this quickly changes after some service in the Revenue Police. Certainly by the time he has arrived in New York City (as a tavern clerk) he is involved in Irish Nationalism and soon becomes deeply involved in Democratic politics at Tammany Hall. Interestingly he was at the outbreak of war facing a court martial for refusing to parade the regiment for the Prince of Wales' visit in 1859. These charges are quickly dropped and eventually he will become a Brigadier General (mostly due to the number of Irish men he will recruit) before his untimely demise in 1863.

Its Lieutenant Colonel will initially be Robert Nugent formerly of County Down, Ireland. However he misses the battle due to having broken his shoulder when he fell off his horse in June. He does however once he recovers go on to command the later 69th New York Volunteers and indeed The Irish Brigade and will later become a Brigadier General.

In the immediate run up to the battle Captain J Haggerty formerly of Company A is appointed acting Lieutenant Colonel and Captain. He does not survive the battle.

Its Major is A. J. Bagley but according to one source he remains in New York (reason not stated). Alternatively is this the same as Lieutenant Bagley (no first name given in Sherman's OR) who is on W. T. Sherman's staff during the battle. Sherman is their future brigade commander and perhaps Major is only a Militia rank. If not that then they are related I would guess. Whatever, according to Sherman this Lieutenant Bagley requests and receives permission to fight with his company in the 69th and was lightly wounded and captured. [As possible supporting evidence I have found a special order ordering the Major to accompany the 69th to Washington DC. Whether he does or not is another matter]

Similarly during or in the immediate run up to the battle Captain Thomas Francis Meagher of Company K (born in County Waterford) is appointed acting Major and Captain. This ardent nationalist will rise to the rank of Brigadier General though there are (unsubstantiated) allegations that at First Bull Run he was drunk. For more information on Meagher I suggest the excellent: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/irish-revolutionist-–-thomas-francis-meagher.155618/


The Company Commanders will be:

A: (Irish Fusiliers) Captain J Haggerty and then Lieutenant T. Kelly is appointed Lieutenant and acting Captain upon the promotion of Captain Haggerty.

B: Officially Captain T. Lynch but during the battle it will actually be commanded by Lieutenant and acting Captain W. M. Giles. (I have not been able to determine why Captain Lynch was not in command)

C: Captain J Cavanagh. From Tipperary. Later Major in the 69th New York Volunteers.

D: Captain T. Clarke.

E: Captain P. Kelly (Possibly this is the future commander of the Irish Brigade Colonel Patrick Kelly but it is a common name in the regiment and I have no corroborative evidence)

F: Captain J. Breslin until 4 days before the battle when he is accidentally severely wounded in the right shoulder (method of injury unknown). Lieutenant and acting Captain P. Duffy will command during the battle.

G: (Mechanics Guard) Certainly initially commanded by Captain Felix Duffy (A highly thought of Mexican War veteran). Reports then differ. One suggests that by the battle Lieutenant and acting Captain W. Butler was in command of the company for while the regiment was in Washington DC Duffy resigned his commission. The other suggests Duffy commanded the company and was wounded in the right hand during the battle. As yet I have been unable to divine the truth though I would tentatively suggest that he did not resign his commission. Whatever, he seems to have later commanded Company G of the 69th New York Volunteers until he was killed at Antietam where he was acting Major of the Regiment.

H: Captain James Kelly. He takes command after the battle and writes the regiment's Official Report after the battle. Will later command the Regiment though there is a question about him. Some reports suggest that technically he is still an officer of the 16th US Infantry and that either he hasn't resigned or that he tried but it was not accepted. Whatever, he seems to be AWOL from the 16th US during the battle. This won't hurt his later career (due to W. T. Sherman's intervention) and he will rise to at least the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

EDIT - see below for details of Company I!

J EDIT - That should be a K: (Irish or Meagher's Zouaves – names seemingly used interchangeably) Initially Captain Thomas F Meagher but after his promotion Lieutenant and acting Captain E.K Butler.

'Corps Engineers': Captain J Quinlan (apparently with Captain J. B Kirker as supernumary Captain)


The Regiments strength will be variously stated.

Supposedly on the 12th April (prior to Lincoln's call) the various parts of the regiment had only 245 men on its muster rolls. This quickly swells to 1,000 almost entirely Irish men within a few days (according to one source).
However newspaper reports beg to differ. One dated 1st May suggest they are 1,250 strong while two both dated 4th May suggest 1,450 or 1,100 men. This is while the Regiment is in DC.
Kelly in his OR again states they had '1000 muskets' during the battle which seems a rather 'convenient' number but gives us some idea of their sizable pre battle strength.


To the battle itself:

The 69th will be one of the first regiments sent to Washington DC (in response to the panic about Confederate invasion and possibly minus Company K – who may not arrive until early May – reports differ). They will travel on the steamer James Adger, the 8th and 13th New York accompanying them on other vessels and they arrived either late on the 25th or early on the 26th April. In Washington DC they will initially be billeted in the grounds of Georgetown College. From there they move to Georgetown Heights. After that they will go on to create Camp (Later Fort) Corcoran (named after their Colonel) in Arlington to guard the southern end of the Aqueduct Bridge.

Initially assigned to Colonel Hunter's command they will then find themselves in a brigade commanded by none other than then Colonel William T. Sherman. The rest of the brigade is the 13th New York (Brooklyn) and 79th New York (Highlanders) as well as the 2nd Wisconsin who will go on to fame and legend as part of The Iron Brigade.

This Brigade will be the third of four in Daniel Tyler's 1st Division and on the 21st July 1861 (The day of battle) the brigade leaves camp at Centreville at 2.30 A.M and a deeply confused march follows with an average speed of at most one mile an hour. Finally in position near the Stone Bridge by 10 A.M it is then that Sherman spots troops moving to his right. To counter this the 69th are shifted to the right of the brigade though he does nothing else until Hunter's Division crosses at Suddley Springs. Then when he hears firing as ordered he crosses at a ford that he alone has observed and that is not defended with the 69th in the lead of the brigade.

It is as they are advancing cautiously that they encounter a group of retreating enemy (in some reports said to be Louisiana Zouaves – in other words Wheat's First Louisiana Special Battalion), a brief firefight ensued and it was then that acting Lieutenant Colonel Haggarty is killed. Sometime around then there is something that does not make the Official Report. Apparently the 69th somehow gets confused and almost opens up on the gray clad 13th New York of their own brigade. Then after this the brigade sorts itself out and takes position initially behind Porter's brigade of Hunter's Division. This does not appear to last long and the 69th will soon find itself tangling with the 4th Alabama of Bee's Brigade. This is a hard fight but the 69th appear to prevail amidst much confusion. However they will be unable to do much else for it looks like Imboden's well placed 4 x 6pdr smoothbores take a horrible toll on the regiment when it attempts to advance. Then the rest of the army collapses.

Corcoran claims they made it off the field pretty much as a formed unit (before he is captured by Confederate Cavalry) but this seems... unlikely.

Indeed it looks like it would be more accurate to say that it is the following day back at Camp Corcoran before the regiment re-forms for the battle will not have been a good one for the 69th.


Colonel Corcoran was lightly wounded and captured. Acting Lieutenant Colonel Haggerty was one of the first to fall (as per both the OR and private correspondence from Colonel Corcoran).

These are far from the only casualties.

37 more men are killed as well as 58 more wounded while 2 more officers and 93 men will be missing. All told they will lose very nearly 200 of their number as well as one of their two battle flags (Their National Colors). Oddly now Acting Colonel and Captain James Kelly will be the man to actually take command of the regiment and make the Official Report for the 69th rather than acting Major Meagher who is the senior surviving officer. Then again Kelly is (was?) a Regular Officer therefore perhaps he understands better what is desired by Headquarters. Alternatively maybe there are truth to the rumors that Meagher really was drunk...

The regiment was in the immediate aftermath of the battle whisked back to New York City so it could after a 'heroic' march through the streets by apparently half naked troops be mustered out on the 25th (This is but 4 days after the battle).

It says something about them that a sizable number immediately reform as the fabled 69th New York Volunteers.


SOURCES: Primarily as follows: William T. Sherman's long and tortuous Official Report (crystal clear in places, as clear as particularly dense mud in others and with curious omissions), Captain Kelly's concise and easily comprehensible Official Report, www.firstbullrun.co.uk mostly for newspaper reports, http://www.69thnewyork.co.uk/69history1861.htm mostly for information on the officers and https://bullrunnings.wordpress.com for a couple of Personal Accounts from the Regiment.
I believe that the rumor that Meagher was intoxicated was started by a reporter for the Times of London who may have had ulterior motives for the charge.
 
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Many rumors swirled around Meagher after the battle. Many Southern newspapers claimed that Meagher was about to leave the army and would never again fight for the Union.

New York Tribune
Thursday, Jul 25, 1861
New York, NY
Vol: XXI
Issue: 6327
Page: 4

meagher.JPG
 

Hussar Yeomanry

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Meagher seems to be a problematic figure for the Official Reports do not tally with what the newspapers are saying. The newspapers love him, some of the men love him and the OR's totally ignore him.... as if he wasn't even there...

As to what the truth is I really don't know.
 

luinrina

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Meagher seems to be a problematic figure for the Official Reports do not tally with what the newspapers are saying. The newspapers love him, some of the men love him and the OR's totally ignore him.... as if he wasn't even there...

As to what the truth is I really don't know.
Maybe he or friends wrote to the newspapers to paint him in good light. Also, Meagher himself published newspapers, and @John Hartwell once told me that newspapers tended to reprint articles from other newspapers. They could have easily picked those articles out of there.

The papers loving Meagher could maybe also be from him being a great speaker. They then transferred that love to reports about him in battle.

I agree, though, that this doesn't make it any easier to discern the truth about him.
 
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Hussar Yeomanry

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@luinrina All good points. I hadn't considered that he was a newspaper man.

Personally I just don't know what to think though I still find it very suspicious that he as duly appointed acting Major does not take command when his regiment needs him and that the senior Captain does.

Possibly it would have been helpful if Corcoran had written a Supplement to the Official Report like some of those who were captured but he doesn't. We do have some personal correspondance from him and Meagher isn't mentioned one way or another (admittedly mostly the two letters are about which officers and men are being held along side him and his concern for them and their families) but there is a little about the battle - with quite a lot specifically about how he ended up being captured (bad luck it looks like) and Meagher is again absent from them (which is a little odd as some reports Meagher as specifically being appointed acting Major so he can be an assistant to Corcoran in the battle ahead of them).

Shrugs as he guesses we'll just never know what he did or did not do there.
 
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More information on the strength of the various companies as of the 8th January 1861 when they seem to have sent in their official returns.

Officers only mentioned when not as above.

A: 79
B: 30
C: 45
D: 48
E: 35
F: 38
G: 38
H: 70 - J Kelly - suggesting that he isnt AWOL from the Regular army - unless he is moonlighting at this point as well (unlikely)
I: Zero. But officially with a Captain Nugent commanding. What happens to him I have no idea.
K: Zip. Nothing. Nada. But officially with a Captain Reilly commanding. What happens to him I have no idea.

Although (significantly) understrength the 8 companies (of the ten they are supposed to have) appear to be quite a bit bigger than many New York State Militia Regiments at this point.

There are also suggestions that in early April attempts are made to create a Company I... though not by this Captain Nugent. Instead it is 1st Lieutenant Coonan (previously mentioned) who is running this.

No attempt seems to be made to create a Company K until the Meagher/ Irish Zouaves are added.
 

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Continued research (included here for completeness) has found another suggestion that Captain Felix Duffy of Company G resigned while in Washington DC. Specifically http://www.civilwardata.com/active/hdsquery.dll?Muster?a=1562&b=U&c=&d=1&e=1&f=20 has him resigning on the 17th May.

There still however remains confusion on this point.

Major Bagley's whereabouts similarly remains an issue for according to the same site he musters out with his regiment back in New York. Furthermore I have him as A J Bagley. The site has him as James Bagley of the Regimental Staff - so looks like it is the same guy but there is a discrepancy.

Same site used for the below:

Acting Major [EDIT - obviously that should read Acting Lieutenant Colonel :redface:] J Haggerty, formerly Captain of Company A is James Haggerty
Acting Captain T Kelly of Company A is Theodore Kelly.

The possibly absent Captain T Lynch of Company B is Thomas Lynch
The possibly Acting Captain W M Giles of Company B is William M Giles

Captain J Cavanagh of Company C is James Cavanagh

Captain T Clarke of Company D is Thomas Clarke

Captain P Kelly of Company E as per that site and also @rpkennedy is Patrick Kelly. This image of him is from his wikipedia page.
1554239832474.png


The unfortunate Captain J Breslin of Company F is John Breslin
Acting Captain P Duffy of Company F is Patrick Duffy

Felix Duffy mentioned above.
Possibly Acting Captain W Butler of Company G is problematic. There is a William Butler down as a Company Officer but he is down for
Company H... He was transferred? Or perhaps Felix Duffy remains in command.

Captain James Kelly originally named as such.

Captain J. P. McIvor of Company I is James Patrick McIvor.
Lieutenant J Coonan of Company I - is John Coonan.

Captain Thomas F Meagher originally named as such.
Acting Captain E K Butler of Company K is Edward K Butler.

Captain J Quinlan of the Engineers is James Quinlan
(Supernumary Engineer Captain J B Kirker is not on their list)
 
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Some of these officers after their term with the 69th New York State Militia.

Theodore Kelly: Major, 182nd New York
Thomas F. Lynch: Major, 63rd New York. Died of disease, February 12, 1862
James Cavanaugh: Major, 69th New York. Wounded at Fredericksburg, discharged for wounds May 19, 1863
Patrick Kelly: Lt. Colonel and Colonel, 88th New York. Killed at Petersburg, June 16, 1864
Felix Duffy: Captain, 69th New York. Killed at Antietam, September 17, 1862
James Kelly: Lt. Colonel, 69th New York. Mustered out while absent (sick), backdated to June 12, 1863
James P. McIvor: Lt. Colonel and Colonel, 170th New York
John Coonan: Captain and Lt. Colonel, 182nd New York
Edward K. Butler: Lieutenant and Captain, 182nd New York

Ryan
 
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To expand what @rpkennedy said:

Major A J Bagley is not John Bagley (my mistake). John Bagley appears to be a 22 year old Lieutenant on the staff/ technically Company E and entirely possibly the Major's son. He is captured at Bull Run (as per Sherman's OR) but eventually is paroled and rejoins the 69th NY Volunteers as a Lieutenant in Company F. June '63 he becomes Captain of Company E. Service seems sporadic however and he leaves and rejoins the regiment a number of times (was he in poor health?). However he seems a trier for when he returns in '64 there seems to be no vacancy for a Captain. So he rejoins as a 1st Lieutenant...

A: Captain Theodore Kelly: 38 years old in '61: Then Captain Company A 69th NY Vols. Then Major May '62. This does not last long. Certainly not beyond September and he reverts to Captain. Later Major, 182nd New York

B: Captain Thomas F. Lynch: 27 years old in '61: Major, 63rd New York. Died of disease, February 12, 1862 [Records seem to disagree on this - I have him doing later service in both the 69th NY Vols - to September 62. Then NY 77th Militia. Also no record of Major]

C: Captain James Cavanaugh: Major, 69th New York. Wounded at Fredericksburg, discharged for wounds May 19, 1863 [Not going to touch this one for the NY records don't seem to agree! Some have him discharged in May '63 as suggested. Others have him as Lieutenant Colonel of the 69th in May '63! Did he make a comeback?]

D: Captain T Clarke: 49 years old in '61: Wounded at Bull Run. [Seems to have later been a Major in the 69th NY Volunteers but the records are confusing. How many Major's did this regiment have?!]

E: Patrick Kelly: Lt. Colonel and Colonel, 88th New York. Killed at Petersburg, June 16, 1864 [Much has been written about this man. I will not repeat it]

F: Captain John Breslin: Age not given: Wounded in the run up to Bull Run and despite Corcoran's breezy asssurance to the newspaper that he would completely recover he sees no future service.

G: Captain Felix Duffy: 37 years old in '61: Reenlists as Captain, Company G 69th New York Volunteers. Killed at Antietam - possibly as Acting Major, September 17, 1862.
1st Lieutenant Company H then G or Acting Captain Company G (?) William Butler: 28 years old in '61: Wounded at Bull Run. Then 1st Lieut Company H 69th New York Volunteers. Promoted Captain May 62 and then serves in the 182nd NY.

H: James Kelly: Lt. Colonel, 69th New York Volunteers. Mustered out while absent (sick), backdated to June 12, 1863

1st Lieutenant Company H then G or Acting Captain Company G (?) William Butler: 28 years old in '61: Wounded at Bull Run. Then 1st Lieut Company H 69th New York Volunteers. Promoted Captain May 62 and then serves in the 182nd NY.

I: Captain James P. McIvor: 25 years old in '61. Captured at Bull Run. Then upon parole Captain Company I 69th New York Volunteers. Then Lt. Colonel and Colonel, 170th New York as of September 62. Later ('65) possibly Brevet Brigadier and Major General though I am not totally convinced by the evidence for this.

John Coonan: 31 years old in '61: Promoted Captain in the 69th New York Volunteers in May '62. Then Lt. Colonel, 182nd New York

Edward K. Butler: 26 years old in '61: Acting Captain of K Company during First Bull Run but reenlists in Company K of 69th NY Volunteers as 1st Lieutenant. Transfers to Company C as its Captain in July '63. Then Captain, 182nd New York. Killed at Cold Harbor.

The main thing I will say is the tremendous transfer of officers from the 69th NYSV to the 69th NYV.
 
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