The Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862


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James N.

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#22
Thanks for sharing this awesome story.
I have really enjoyed this thread! Seems to have been a true labor of love.
Glad you liked it; when I became the host of the Stonewall Jackson Forum here several years ago I decided I wanted to visit or re-visit the scenes of his battles as well as reading or re-reading the many works on him and his campaigns for exactly this purpose. In recent years I've made several visits to the Shenandoah Valley, Harpers Ferry, and Antietam which provided grist for a number of threads such as this one: https://www.civilwartalk.com/thread...paign-a-synopsis-and-index-to-threads.124248/ This spring I finally had the opportunity to revisit the Virginia Piedmont, resulting in another thread similar to this one: https://www.civilwartalk.com/threads/the-campaign-of-chancellorsville-may-1-5-1863.145416/ Below, at the Chancellorsville Crossroads:

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James N.

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#23
What time did Lee summon Jackson's Corps up from down river and what were their arrival times?

Can any positively ID these officers who are with Lee?
View attachment 214921
Gary, sorry to be so long in responding to your questions, but the holidays have messed up my usual routines and I'm just now getting back to my regular schedule! In reply to the first, according to the highly detailed ant informative Stonewall Jackson and the American Civil War by G. F. R. Henderson,

[On December 12] Jackson brought up A. P. Hill and Taliferro at noon, and posted them on Longstreet's right; but it was not till that hour, when it had at last become certain that the whole Federal army was crossing, that couriers were dispatched to call in Early and D. H. Hill. Once more the Army of northern Virginia was concentrated at exactly the right moment on the field of battle.

A. P. Hill's and Taliferro's divisions were already present but held out-of-sight in reserve near Hamilton's Crossing but were too big themselves to cover the relatively narrow frontage between Hood's right and Prospect Hill so they had been put in two lines with half of Hill's division behind the other half. When D. H. Hill and Early arrived around the end of the day they went into reserve in still a third line; that's why when Meade found the gap between Lane and Archer and plowed through them to smash and scatter Gregg's brigade, Early was right there to provide an immediate counterattack.

As for identities of Ogden's subordinate Confederate officers, his primary object was usually costuming; the uniforms were what mattered most! In another example, his most famous work was a collection of paintings reproduced around 1900 as prints showing the uniforms of the U. S. Army from the Revolution through the new regulations of 1902; he often included famous commanders like Winfield Scott, U. S. Grant, and Nelson Miles as subjects surrounded by their staffs or subordinates who were usually generic "models" not representing anyone in particular. It might be guessed that one of the bearded officers at Lee's side is supposed to be Longstreet.
 
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