The Battle of Bald/Leggett's Hill

AUG

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Southeast_Side_of_Leggetts_Hill_June_24_1929.jpg

This is supposedly a photo of the southeastern slope of Bald Hill, taken June 24, 1929. Photograph by Walter Sparks, Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (Source)

Bald Hill was located a couple miles east of Atlanta. In an effort to slow the Federal advance on the city, Maj. Gen. Patrick Cleburne's Division and elements of Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler's Cavalry Corps defended this position on July 21, 1864, against Maj. Gen. Francis P. Blair's XVII Corps. The Confederates were entrenched on top of the hill facing east, the Federals attacking up the slope. Both sides fought to a standstill after a small but very fierce battle, Cleburne stating that it was "the bitterest fight" of his life. The fight produced over 1,000 casualties; Blair had lost around 700 men and Cleburne near 300.

The Confederates withdrew from the position that night, Cleburne's linking up with the rest of Lt. Gen. William J. Hardee's Corps and marching around the Federal Army of the Tennessee's left flank, culminating in the Battle of Atlanta the following day.

The hill was also a critical terrain feature in the Battle of Atlanta, July 22, situated at the Federal center and again fiercely contested by both sides. It would later be known as "Leggett's Hill," after Brig. Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett, who's division attacked the hill on July 21 and defended it on July 22.

Like the rest of the Atlanta battleground, today the hill is completely paved over. It was leveled during highway construction in the 1960s and is now the intersection of Moreland Avenue and I-20.

A virtual tour of the area can be viewed here: http://www.inheritage.org/almanack/battle-of-atlanta-today-history-tour-american-civil-war-02/

ATLANTA_OM3.jpg


Leggetts_Hill_v._2_Cyclorama.jpg

Image from the Atlanta Cyclorama of Confederate troops attacking Bald Hill during the Battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864.
 

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AUG

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A few accounts of the battle for the anniversary....


Report of Brig. Gen. James A. Smith commanding what is best known as Granbury's Texas Brigade in Cleburne's Division:

Macon, Ga., August 5, 1864.​
I have the honor to report as follows concerning the part taken by my brigade in the action on 21st of July, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga.:​
The brigade was moved into position on the extreme right of the army, about a mile south of the Atlanta and Augusta Railroad, at daylight, relieving some cavalry who occupied the position previous to the arrival of my brigade. I immediately proceeded to construct such works.for protection as the limited means at my disposal would permit. Owing, however, to the position being much exposed and the close proximity of the enemy, who occupied a strongly intrenched position, our progress was slow. About 7 o’clock he opened a battery on my left, about 800 yards distant, which swept my line from left to right, committing dreadful havoc in the ranks. I have never before witnessed such accurate and destructive cannonading. In a few minutes 40 men were killed and over 100 wounded by this battery alone. In the Eighteenth Texas Cavalry Regiment (dismounted) 17 of the 18 men composing one company were placed hors de combat by one shot alone. When the cannonading ceased the enemy’s infantry moved on our front in heavy force, and succeeded in driving the cavalry on my right in confusion from its position, thereby causing the right regiment of my brigade to give way. This regiment, the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Texas Cavalry (dismounted), was soon rallied and in turn drove back the enemy with heavy loss, regaining its position in the line.​
During the fearful cannonading on our flank and rear both officers and men demeaned themselves with marked coolness and courage. Not a man left his post, but quietly awaited the coming charge, which was repulsed with heavy loss, the enemy leaving a number of his killed and wounded in our hands.​
The loss of the brigade in this affair was 47 killed, 120 wounded, and 19 captured. Among the wounded were Lieutenant-Colonel Neyland, commanding the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth Texas Cavalry (dismounted); Captain Fisher, commanding the Sixth and Fifteenth Texas Regiments, and Captain Houston, who succeeded him in the command of the regiment. Among the killed was Captain Bennett, of the Tenth Texas Regiment, a most gallant and meritorious officer.​
J. A. SMITH,​
Brigadier- General.​
Capt. I. A. Buck,​
Assistant Adjutant-General, Cleburne’s Division.​
Diary entry of Capt. Samuel T. Foster, Co. H, 24th Texas Cavalry (dismounted):

July 21st​
Made breastworks of logs, and by nine Oclock a.m. the Yanks artillery open on us from our left, their shell enfalading our lines. They have heard us chopping down trees and building our works and have our range—and the woods are so thick we can’t see them. Their artillery are killing our men very fast—One company just to my left after finishing their works sat down to rest in a little ditch they had dug, when a shell came and took them at one end and killed and crippled every man in the ditch. Knocked one man in a hundred piece—one hand and arm went over the works and his cartridge box was ten feet up in a tree.​
My Company had completed their works when as I was lying down resting on my elbow—and another man in about the same position with our heads about two feet apart and our feet in opposite directions, a shell (schrapnell) exploded just between us—blowing me one way and him the other hurting neither one of us but killing three men about 10 ft. from us eating their breakfast.​
About the middle of the day the small arms open on us in front of us and as soon as our pickets came in a general fight opens along our line.​
There are some dismounted cavalry to our right making our line longer and when the Yanks make the charge the cavalry shoot their guns off as fast as possible, while our pickets are getting in front of them. The pickets could do nothing but lie down and be captured by the Yanks—I lost three thus. As soon as the cavalry discharge their guns they all break and run like good fellows which leaves our right exposed and the Yanks following the cavalry pass by the right end of our line while those in front of us are held back by us.​
Our Regt. which is on the right are taken out of the works and form a line at a double quick behind our works and perpendicular to it, which puts the left of the regt at the works—while the right is the length of the regt. off—We go forward quick time and drive the Yanks out in short order, and swing around and occupy our line again—then we are put in single file so as to cover the ground that had been occupied by the cavalry.​
Here is where Lt Boerner of Capt Flys Co and Bud Martin same company were killed—both shot in the head, and while we were driving the Yanks out from our rear, one man (Joe Harrison) of my Co. ran up to a Yank, that was cursing a wounded Confed, put the muzzle of his gun to his back and blew him up.​
I lost today out of my Company Sergt [ ] Chas Pepper and John Sutton killed—Thos Fisher wounded; and three captured on the picket line.​
I am put in charge of the Picket line today to bring off the Pickets tonight—Our whole corps (Hardees) will move tonight some where, and the Yanks are so close to us in front that it is a dangerous maneuver—and requires considerable skill.​
(One of Cleburne's Command: The Civil War Reminiscences And Diary of Captain Samuel T. Foster)
 

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Report of Maj. Gen. Joe Wheeler.

Headquarters Cavalry Corps,​
October 9, 1864.​
Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following brief report of the operations of my command from the date General Hood assumed command of the Army of Tennessee to the present time: My command consisted of two divisions of cavalry, under Generals Kelly and Iverson, and one small brigade, under General Williams, in all. General Kelly with his entire command had been detached to guard the Augusta railroad, and General Williams had also been detached and was reporting direct to Major-General Cheatham. With the remainder of my command, numbering about 1,600 men, re-enforced by Ferguson’s brigade, I was engaged during the 17th and 18th of July opposing the advance of General Thomas, and during the 19th and 20th of July in opposing the advance of General McPherson’s entire army, consisting of three army corps. During this time we fought behind successive lines of breast-works, inflicting heavy losses upon the enemy, and repulsing several assaults of his skirmish lines, which were almost dense enough to make them lines of battle, and were always supported by strong lines of battle. On the 19th and 20th I was so heavily pressed as to be obliged to call for re-enforcements, but none could be sent me. About 4 o’clock the enemy charged my line with a heavy line of battle. General Ferguson, who was on the right, gave way, but on reaching his position I re-established his line on ground equally as favorable, and maintained the line thus established until night.​
About daylight the following morning (21st) General Cleburne with his division of infantry came, pursuant to General Hood’s orders, to relieve me, while I was ordered to extend my line to the right. General Cleburne placed his troops so closely together that only a little more than half my line was occupied by General Cleburne’s troops. While changing position, and before my troops had faced toward the enemy, a general attack was made on my own and General Cleburne’s front. General Ferguson, who was on the right, reported a force turning his right flank, when, at the same moment, a general assault of several lines of battle was made by the enemy. Ferguson gave way in some confusion, which exposed the right of Allen’s brigade, which, with the Georgia brigade, nevertheless, fought brilliantly, repulsing a desperate assault and killing the enemy in hand-to-hand conflicts. On the enemy’s second assault both the Georgia and Alabama brigades, with the right brigade of Cleburne’s division, were forced from their works by an overwhelming force. After falling back a short distance the Georgia and part of the Alabama brigades, rallied, charged the enemy, and retook the works, with 2 officers and 20 privates, beside a number of the enemy’s dead and wounded, some of whom were killed in our rifle-pits. This was a most brilliant feat, and the Georgia brigade deserves great credit for its conduct upon that day.​
Our loss in killed and wounded was not severe, and we did not lose any prisoners. The loss of the enemy was severe. I then established my line and maintained my position until relieved late in the day by Cheatham’s division.​
 

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Report of Col. George E. Bryant, acting commander of Brig. Gen. Manning F. Force's brigade after his wounding in the battle of Atlanta, July 22. Force's brigade made the assault on Bald Hill on July 21 and also defended it the following day.

Hdqrs. First Brig., Third Div., 17th Army Corps,​
Near Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864.​
Captain: I have the honor to submit the following in brief of the part taken by the First Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Army Corps, consisting of the Twentieth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, and Forty-fifth Illinois and Sixteenth Wisconsin Regiments, from May 1, 1864, to July 22, 1864:​
[. . . .]​
On the 16th of July the brigade marched from its position on the right of the army, via Marietta, Ga., and Roswell, passing through Decatur, Ga., July 20, and bivouacking four miles from that place, our line of battle, facing west, at foot of hill occupied by the enemy.​
At 7 a. m. on the 21st the brigade was ordered to charge and hold the hill in its front. The Twelfth and Sixteenth Wisconsin Regiments formed the advance of the charging column, supported by the Twentieth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Illinois Regiments. The charge was made under very heavy musketry, the enemy being protected by intrenchments on the crest of the hill. The works were taken at the point of the bayonet and held, with aggregate loss to the First Brigade of (except Twentieth Illinois Regiment) about 258 killed, wounded, and missing. The steady and unwavering advance of the columns under the terrible fire from the enemy’s line (Cleburne’s famous division), advantageously posted behind intrenchments, was such as to merit for both officers and men the highest record for courage and skill. In this charge the Twelfth Wisconsin Regiment lost out of less than 600 men engaged 134 men killed and wounded. It captured more small-arms than it had men engaged, many of the arms still loaded and capped. It had 5 color bearers shot and 2 flag-staffs shot off. Other regiments of the brigade behaved with equal gallantry, but suffered less loss.​
 
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Below is what was written in a letter home to his wife by Major Sims H. Giles (QM Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade / Col. Robert O. Perrin`s 11th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry) on 21-22 Jul 1864 regarding the fighting at Bald Hill:

"We have fallen back to this place (Bald Hill) and have had heavy fighting last evening (20th) and this morning. Our Brigade (Ferguson`s) is doing good service, we are losing some men but not many as yet, none of our friends are hurt as yet. Our horses are all nearly a mile inside of the fortifications and the only danger we are in is from an occasional stray shell which we have learned to dodge, so I tell you again not to be at all uneasy about me. I think we will have a very hard fight here and will be sure to give the Yanks a good thrashing if they stand up to the fight. So we may be here for several days before anything decisive is known, but you will hear before you get this that we are alright and whipped the Yanks.

...I wish you could be here for just two hours to witness a battle. There was the artillery almost drowning the fire of the small arms. To see the shells exploding is all grand to behold. Now while I write there is a constant roar of musketry and artillery. We are driving the Yanks back, but expect to have a hard day`s work. I will write more this evening... 6 O`clock PM; our men are all safe, we have had heavy skirmishing and fighting all day, but you will hear all this before you get any letter so I will close, but keep this (letter) open until morning so as to add the very latest news... 22nd July, 7 O`clock PM; We have just won a great victory (at Decatur and later back at the southern base of Bald Hill where Maj. General James B. McPherson was killed during the fighting) our regiment ( and Brigade) was in all the fight. None of our friends are hurt. More tomorrow."

What I find interesting about his account is that it comes from the Quartermaster of Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade, who was in the rear during the whole fight. As the action was taking place he was writing home to his wife what he was experiencing and witnessing. At this time Brig. General Samuel Wragg Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade was comprised of the 2nd Regiment Alabama Cavalry, the 56th Alabama Partisan Rangers, the 12th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry, the 11th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry and the 9th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry. While Major Giles was writing this letter the rest of the Brigade was in the trenches fighting as dismounted cavalry on the right of Maj. General Joseph Wheeler and the left of Brig. General William Wirt Allen`s Alabama Cavalry, to include the Georgia Brigade of Maj. General Patrick Cleburne`s division.
 
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Here is the current view of that same location/view

almanack-battle-atlanta-18-union-fallback.jpg



The hill and all the surrounding battlefield area were completely destroyed in order to put in Interstate 20 in the 1960's. They did discover several caches of discarded weapons and ammunition while putting in the interstate.
 

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Below is what was written in a letter home to his wife by Major Sims H. Giles (QM Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade / Col. Robert O. Perrin`s 11th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry) on 21-22 Jul 1864 regarding the fighting at Bald Hill:

"We have fallen back to this place (Bald Hill) and have had heavy fighting last evening (20th) and this morning. Our Brigade (Ferguson`s) is doing good service, we are losing some men but not many as yet, none of our friends are hurt as yet. Our horses are all nearly a mile inside of the fortifications and the only danger we are in is from an occasional stray shell which we have learned to dodge, so I tell you again not to be at all uneasy about me. I think we will have a very hard fight here and will be sure to give the Yanks a good thrashing if they stand up to the fight. So we may be here for several days before anything decisive is known, but you will hear before you get this that we are alright and whipped the Yanks.

...I wish you could be here for just two hours to witness a battle. There was the artillery almost drowning the fire of the small arms. To see the shells exploding is all grand to behold. Now while I write there is a constant roar of musketry and artillery. We are driving the Yanks back, but expect to have a hard day`s work. I will write more this evening... 6 O`clock PM; our men are all safe, we have had heavy skirmishing and fighting all day, but you will hear all this before you get any letter so I will close, but keep this (letter) open until morning so as to add the very latest news... 22nd July, 7 O`clock PM; We have just won a great victory (at Decatur and later back at the southern base of Bald Hill where Maj. General James B. McPherson was killed during the fighting) our regiment ( and Brigade) was in all the fight. None of our friends are hurt. More tomorrow."

What I find interesting about his account is that it comes from the Quartermaster of Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade, who was in the rear during the whole fight. As the action was taking place he was writing home to his wife what he was experiencing and witnessing. At this time Brig. General Samuel Wragg Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade was comprised of the 2nd Regiment Alabama Cavalry, the 56th Alabama Partisan Rangers, the 12th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry, the 11th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry and the 9th Regiment Mississippi Cavalry. While Major Giles was writing this letter the rest of the Brigade was in the trenches fighting as dismounted cavalry on the right of Maj. General Joseph Wheeler and the left of Brig. General William Wirt Allen`s Alabama Cavalry, to include the Georgia Brigade of Maj. General Patrick Cleburne`s division.
Thanks for posting this account.

While Major Giles was writing this letter the rest of the Brigade was in the trenches fighting as dismounted cavalry on the right of Maj. General Joseph Wheeler and the left of Brig. General William Wirt Allen`s Alabama Cavalry, to include the Georgia Brigade of Maj. General Patrick Cleburne`s division.
There was no brigade of Georgians in Cleburne's Division at this time. My understanding is that Granbury's Texas Brigade (under James A. Smith) was positioned to the left (north) of Wheeler's cavalry, elements of both on the hill itself. To the Texans' left was Lowrey's Brigade of Mississippi and Alabama troops, and to their left was Govan's Arkansas Brigade, the line running off to the side of Bald Hill.

James A. Smith later did take command of a brigade of Georgians (formerly Mercer's) that was transferred to Cleburne's Division after William H.T. Walker's Division was broken up following his death in the battle of Atlanta, July 22.
 
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At the time of Peach Tree Creek / Bald Hill / Battle of Decatur and Atlanta, Brig. General William Wirt Allen's Brigade was composed of the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 9th, 12th, and 51st Alabama Cavalry regiments, and they served in the corps of Joseph Wheeler in the Army of Tennessee. Allen led the brigade throughout the Alabama Campaign. I believe that in early August 1864 the Georgia cavalry brigade of which Wheeler made mention in his summary of the Battle of Bald Hill was added to Allen's force, and later, Anderson's Brigade. This gave Allen a full division, which served in the Atlanta Campaign, as well as during Sherman's March to the Sea (Savannah Campaign). I was thinking that it was with Cleburne`s division, if not maybe it was with Allen temporarily on detached service until early August when it was permanently assigned to him.

"General Cleburne placed his troops so closely together that only a little more than half my line was occupied by General Cleburne's troops. While changing position, and before my troops had faced toward the enemy, a general attack was made on my own and General Cleburne's front. General Ferguson, who was on the right, reported a force turning his right flank, when, at the same moment, a general assault of several lines of battle was made by the enemy. Ferguson gave way in some confusion, which exposed the right of (Brig. General William Wirt) Allen's brigade, which, with the Georgia brigade, nevertheless, fought brilliantly, repulsing a desperate assault and killing the enemy in hand to-hand conflicts.

On the enemy's second assault both the Georgia and Alabama brigades, with the right brigade of Cleburne's division, were forced from their works by an overwhelming force. After falling back a short distance the Georgia and part of the Alabama brigades, rallied, charged the enemy, and retook the works, with 2 officers and 20 privates, beside a number of the enemy's dead and wounded, some of whom were killed in our rifle-pits. This was a most brilliant feat, and the Georgia brigade deserves great credit for its conduct upon that day."

Do you know specifically to whom Wheeler was referring (Georgia Brigade) in his summary of the Battle of Bald Hill in his activity report?
 
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Below is what was written in a letter home to his wife by Major Sims H. Giles (QM Ferguson`s Brigade / Perrin`s Regt.) on 19 Jul 1864 regarding Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade`s move to Decatur while skirmishing against Maj. General George H. Thomas and his forces while protecting the Augusta Railroad from Atlanta to Decatur:

"We made a forced march to this place (Decatur, Ga.) last night (18 Jul 1864), (we) got here about 11 O`clock. Our purpose is to protect the Railroad in this vicinity. We are 8 miles from Atlanta and have a good camp and I think we will have but little to do for the next few day`s if we remain here. We are all in deep distress, because General Johnston has been relieved from duty. I very much fear that this will have a bad effect upon out soldiers (as a whole). They have been very confident and fully satisfied that we would whip the fight whenever it did come off, but I fear this change will cause dissention and demoralization. All the troops seem to be very indignant about it."

Major Sims H. Giles (QM Ferguson`s Brigade / Perrin`s Regt.) continued to write in his letter on 19-20 Jul 1864 regarding the fighting between Decatur and Peach Tree Creek on this day:

"The bugle is now blowing to "Saddle Horses" (Boots and Saddles). We instead of the nice quiet time we expected to have, we had one of the hardest days we have ever had. We were ordered to saddle up to meet the Yanks, they came on us in heavy force. Two Army Corps, 30,000 strong, we had two Brigades and had to fight a pull back all day - the Yanks got the R/R at this place later in the evening (20th). We have fallen back 2 miles towards Atlanta. We will drive them back today or have a big fight. General Wheeler has reinforced us. We had heavy fighting all day yesterday (19th July) - but lost 5 men - killed and wounded - none from our Regt. (Perrins)."

He continued to write:

"Saddle up horses is the order again, so I must stop. Well we have pitched into very heavy skirmishing and while I write the cannons and musket balls are circulating around rapidly. I am in a safe place and can see some and hear all of it, we are driven back to with-in 1 mile of Atlanta - fighting for every foot of ground - we have no infantry on this line, but will have plenty here in one or two hours - more anon."

This is what Maj. General Joseph Wheeler said about Brig. General Samuel Wragg Ferguson`s Cavalry Brigade (2nd Alabama Cavalry Regiment) a few days after the battle of Peachtree Creek, Georgia was fought and waged in his daily report of battle:

"My command consisted of two divisions of cavalry, under Generals Kelly and Iverson, and one small brigade, under General Williams, in all. General Kelly with his entire command had been detached to guard the Augusta railroad, and General Williams had also been detached and was reporting direct to Major-General Cheatham. With the remainder of my command, numbering about 1,000 men, re-enforced by Ferguson's brigade, I was engaged during the 17th and 18th of July opposing the advance of General (George H.) Thomas, and during the 19th and 20th of July in opposing the advance of General McPherson's entire army, consisting of three army corps."

He further stated in his report:

"About 4 o’clock (20th) the enemy charged my line with a heavy line of battle. General Ferguson, who was on the right, gave way, but on reaching his position I re-established his line on ground equally as favorable, and maintained the line thus established until night."

So about 11 PM on the night of the 18th of July Wheeler with Ferguson arrived at or near Decatur to continue to oppose Thomas who had destroyed the Georgia Railroad to Augusta at that point and was now readying to destroy it west of Decatur between there and Atlanta. On the 19th Ferguson with Wheeler began skirmishing and fighting against General George H. Thomas as well as some of McPherson`s forces near Decatur, being driven back westward along the Railroad, as they were trying to protect it, and were gradually being pushed back throughout the day until very early on the 20th where they arrived to Cheatham`s position, from which they fought behind his successive lines of breastworks on the extreme Confederate right throughout the day of the 20th, until late afternoon (6 pm) when they were ordered by Lt. General John Bell Hood to fall back and secure Bald Hill. At which point they began to dig themselves in and put up breastworks to hold the Hill. Cleburne was ordered from Peach Tree Creek where they were held in reserve during the battle there throughout the day of the 20th. They arrived at Bald Hill early on the morning of the 21st, long before sunrise, and also began digging themselves in alongside Wheeler. At day break both were attacked by two divisions of XVII Corps, first by cannonading then followed by lines of battle being sent in with skirmishers leading the way (the battle of Bald Hill).
 
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AUG

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Do you know specifically to whom Wheeler was referring (Georgia Brigade) in his summary of the Battle of Bald Hill in his activity report?
According to The Day Dixie Died by Gary Ecelbarger, it was the cavalry brigade commanded by Brig. Gen. Alfred Iverson, consisting of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Georgia cavalry regiments. The order of battle has them in Maj. Gen. William T. Martin's Division in Wheeler's Corps, alongside Allen's Brigade.

However, I see that Wheeler says in his report that Iverson was in command of the division. He might've been acting division commander at that time.
 
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That actually makes sense as Martin (Iverson and Allen), Kelly, Humes and William Hicks Jackson all had Divisions in Wheelers Corps, with the Cavalry Brigades of Ferguson, Ross and Armstrong comprising Jackson`s Division. Thanks by the way for sharing the Newspaper article above of J. G. Wray, great first hand witness account of the Battle of Bald Hill as well as the moves made as the battle was building up.

Martin made a couple of mistakes in June and July 1864 and fell out of favor with Wheeler, so he could have very well given Iverson "Temporary" command of Martin`s Division by this time. The strained relationship between Martin and Wheeler, eventually saw Martin being reassigned. In August 1864, as Wheeler was attempting to operate against Sherman’s supply line, things broke down completely between the two men. Wheeler was attempting to capture Dalton, Georgia, and counted on Martin to reinforce him. In what Wheeler thought was deliberate disobedience of a direct order, Martin never arrived, and Wheeler "officially" relieved him of command. Martin finished the war back home in Natchez commanding the District of Northwest Mississippi. An obscure assignment of little significance which did not allow Martin to see anymore action during the War.

Soon after the Atlanta Campaign Wheeler nominated Iverson for promotion to Major General because he was so impressed with him. He never received it as things began to fall apart towards the end of the War, but Wheeler was pushing hard for it. At the same time Wheeler was opposing and working against Ferguson being promoted to Major General who was nominated by General P.G.T. Beauregard. His promotion also was not pushed through because of the same reason that Iverson was not due to the timing. Lt. General S. D. Lee nominated William Hicks Jackson for the same promotion, which he was not given either.
 
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