The Atlanta Campaign Tour (2014)

BronxYankee

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Aug 23, 2019
Get to drive through the Kennesaw Battlefield area a lot for work. The shade of the trees on the main road make a quiet peaceful place. You see a lot of Civil War Markers peppered through different areas of metro Atlanta regarding troop movements and areas where the battles were fought.
 

Buckeye Bill

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On this day in 1864, the mayor of Atlanta, James Calhoun, met a captain on the staff of Federal Major General Henry W. Slocum, and surrendered his city, asking for "protection to non-combatants and private property." Federal Major General William T. Sherman, who was in Jonesborough at the time of surrender, sent a telegram to Washington, DC on September 3, reading, "Atlanta is ours, and fairly won". He then established his headquarters there on September 7, where he stayed for over two months. On November 15, 1864, Sherman's army departed east toward Savannah, Georgia on what became known as "Sherman's March to the Sea."

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Buckeye Bill

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* The Atlanta Campaign commenced on this day in 1864 as Major General William Tecumseh Sherman and his army travel south from their camp sites just south of Ringgold, Georgia towards Tunnel Hill, Georgia.
 

Buckeye Bill

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The Battle of Peachtree Creek, Georgia was fought on this day in 1864. This conflict was part of the Atlanta Campaign in the American Civil War. It was the first major attack by Lt. General John Bell Hood since taking command of the Confederate Army of Tennessee. The attack was against Major General William T. Sherman's Federal army which was perched on the doorstep of Atlanta. The main armies in the conflict were the Federal Army of the Cumberland, commanded by Major General George Henry Thomas, and the Confederate Army of Tennessee commanded by Lt. General John Bell Hood.

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Buckeye Bill

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On this day in 1864, Confederate Major General W. H. T. Walker and Federal Major General James B. McPherson were killed during the Battle of Atlanta, Georgia. The Battle of Atlanta was part of the Atlanta Campaign of 1864. The majority of the Atlanta and surrounding area battlefields have been lost to urban development.

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John S. Carter

Sergeant Major
Joined
Mar 15, 2017
* Battle of Ezra Church (Mozley Park).

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* Georgia State Capital Building (General Gordon Statue).

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*Oakland Cemetery.

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* Westview Cemetery.

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* Battle of Utoy Creek.

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* Atlanta Cyclorama.

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* Kennesaw Mountain National Cemetery.

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* Marietta Confederate Cemetery.

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* Marietta National Cemetery.

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* Kennesaw House.

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* Battle of Ruff's Mill (near Smyrna).

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* Jonesboro Confederate Cemetery.

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* The Nash Farm Battlefield (near Lovejoy Station).
These are very interesting photos of important areas for the battle of Atlanta and surrounding areas. No one in the Atlanta government or county has REQUESTED that statues ,as General Gordon's or other statues or makers be removed or transported to other storage facilities? I have just read a interesting book entitled "North across the River, a civil war Trail of Tears'' , author Ruth Beaumont Cook. It is the event of the cotton mills of Roswell ,Marietta, and Sweetwater Creek. It starts with the mills foundations after the years of the Cherokee ,and Creek force transport from that area of North Georgia then comes the part of the Sherman march which has been forgotten or just overlooked by Northern historians of the war as to what occurred to the women and families that worked in those mills Sherman moves into this area and what he does to the men and women who have worked in the mills of those towns is not mentioned by any historian ,except as a footnote or as a note of just these towns. It flows the events of these people from 1864 thought their return ,for some. to Georgia. The reason that the author calls this a Trail of Tears harpoons to the Trail of Tears of the Indians from Georgia. This is one of those reasons ,not so much for Atlanta or the march to the Sea that Sherman and his the Union army is so remembered so fondly by those in North Georgia and in someway the whole state of Georgia. Maybe one week I shall take a tour of that area. North across the River tells one what happen to these people. The book was copyright righted in 1998, My book came from my Mother whose folks came from South Georgia. This would be a very interesting book club book or tea party book club .ENJOY
 
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