Tennessee Civil War Sites

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scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Mount Pleaseant & Columbia area

Rattle and Snap:

Rattle and Snap was named thus by William Polk after winning the 5,000 acres this home is built on in a dice-like game called Rattle and Snap. William Polk deeded his land to his four sons, George Polk being the son who built this mansion in 1845.

Rattle and Snap was the home of one of the Confederacy's well known generals for a short time, General Leonidas Polk, also known as "The Fighting Bishop." During Hood's Tennessee Campaign, many soldiers noted the grandness of this home -- one of Cleburne's men commenting, "the prettiest place I have ever seen in my life."

Rattle and Snap was restored recently and is now open to the public for viewing. It is furnished with many original pieces, and furnishings belonging to Lucius Polk, brother of George Polk.

* Note of Interest: General Leonidas Polk's home was "Ashwood Hall," which burned in a fire after the war.

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St. John's Episcopal Church:

Located at the intersection of Mt. Zion and Columbia Pike, this church was built by the Polk family in the 1840's. It is at this church that General Cleburne, on his way past it in 1864, commented to his officer, "It is almost worth dying to be buried in such a beautiful spot." How poignant that less than a week later his remains should be interred here following the Battle of Franklin. Generals Granbury and Strahl, along with Colonel Beckham (S.D.Lee's Chief of artillery) were buried here as well. Granbury, Strahl and Cleburne were removed in later years.

* Note of Interest: General Carter (also killed at Franklin) is still buried in the Rosehill Cemetery in Columbia.

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Zion Presbyterian:

If you turn left at the intersection of Zion Road, you will come across the oldest church in Maury County and the Zion Cemetery.

This site is of interest in that Sam Watkins of Co. H is buried here.

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Hamilton Place:

Traveling towards Columbia, a short distance past St. John's Church, on the left, is Hamilton Place. This was the home of General Lucius J. Polk, brother of the recently deceased Leonidas Polk. It was here, on November 26th and 27th, that the local citizens entertained officers of the Confederate Army, including Hood, Cheatham, Bate, Brown and Walthall.

* Note of Interest: Used as a Hopital after the Battle of Franklin.
Brig. General Arthur Middleton Manigault (Manigualt Brigade - Edward Johnson Division) Was Cared for here after being wounded in the head At Franklin.
As well as Major Thomas McCarrol Price Jr. of the 22nnd Alabama Infantry.

Details:
Hamilton Place is a private residence and not open to the public.

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The Athenaeum:

Located in town (Columbia), a short distance from President Polk's home, this house was built in 1852 for his nephew. It was used throughout the Civil War by Union officers who occupied Columbia, as well as serving as General Schofield's HQ in November of 1864.

Citizens tell how Loring's Confederate troops rushed into Columbia on the morning of November 28th, smashing and looting the Athenaeum. It was here that General Cheatham is said to have found a map that Schofield inadvertently left behind.

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Note Of Interest:
Off of the town square in Columbia, there stands an old bank building on the corner of Hwy 31 and Columbia Pike. General Earl Van Dorn's body was placed in the vault of this bank building overnight, awaiting funeral services. On the opposite corner, which a flower shop now occupies, is the building in which General Forrest was stabbed by one of his own men.
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Elm Springs:

While traveling on Columbia Pike, coming from Mt. Pleasant, if you were to continue your drive onto Hwy 50 to Mooresville Pike (about 200 yards from intersection), you will find Elm Springs. This mansion was restored and is now used as the National Headquarters for the Sons of the Confederate Veterans. The home was built in 1837. During the war, it was the home of Abram Looney, who served as the Colonel of Company H, First Tennessee Infantry. He was an outspoken Southerner and this almost resulted in the loss of Elm Springs.

In November, 1864, the Federal Army, which had occupied Maury County for several months, was preparing defensive positions ahead of the oncoming Confederate troops under Gen. John B. Hood. Their line of defense extended from the Mooresville Pike to the Mt. Pleasant Pike. One of the defensive tactics used was the destruction of important buildings along the line. Elm Springs anchored the eastern flank of their line. Many houses were burned during those days and Elm Springs was slated to be destroyed too. Fires were started that might have burned the house except for the opportune arrival of Confederate troops who extinguished the flames. You will still find the scorch marks in the hall closet.

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Greenwood Cemetery:

Turning left on Hwy. 31 from Columbia Pike, you'll find a cemetery on your left. This cemetery was established in 1809, overlooking the Duck River. If you'll wander among the headstones, you'll see the damage caused to them by Cox's men, who from across the river, fired upon Stephenson's sharpshooters in an attempt to stop S.D. Lee's men from crossing the river. Looking down the steep embankment to the river, behind the cemetery, you'll wonder how Lee managed to get his pontoons into the water to cross the Duck here.

After your stop at Greenwood, continue following Highway 31, and Schofield's harrowing night march route to Spring Hill
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Spring Hill

Located 12 miles south of Franklin, Tennessee, Spring Hill has been nothing more than a paragraph in our history books and a small town the armies marched through during Hood's 1864 Tennessee Campaign. But with the publication of Wiley Sword's: "Embrace An Angry Wind," the controversial events that took place in Spring Hill have sparked a renewed interest among historians and preservationists.

On November 29th, 1864, General John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee attempted to flank a portion of General George Thomas's Union army, The Army of The Tennessee, in Spring Hill. A Confederate division under command of General Patrick R. Cleburne, along with General Forrest's cavalry, attacked the Federals here in the late afternoon and routed a part of the Federal forces. But due to a puzzling and controversial chain of events, General John M. Schofield and his 23,000 Union soldiers managed to squeeze through the trap that Hood had set, and had retreated to Franklin on the morning of November 30th, where a costly battle was fought between the two armies.
For over 100 years it was believed that nothing more than a skirmish took place here, with virtually no casualties. But with the publication of Alethea Sayer's book: "The Sound of Brown's Guns; The Battle of Spring Hill," facts indicate that the numbers involved in this battle exceeded over 10,000 with combined casualties of 850. In 1995, The Spring Hill Battlefield Preservation Council, with financial aid from the APCWS and CWT, was able to acquire the 110-acre site of the battlefield here. It has remained farmland since the Civil War, as pristine as it was when the battle was fought. Now, there's much more to see in Spring Hill since Maury County and the automaker giant, The Saturn Corporation (located just south of town), teamed up to double the efforts of local historic preservation.

Even before Hood's 1864 Campaign, Spring Hill was known as the place where Confederate General Earl Van Dorn was murdered in 1863. Below, check out sites to see in this small southern town that will definitely make your visit here worthwhile.

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Spring Hill Battlefield:
A 110-acre battlefield site, located off of Highway 51 and Saturn Parkway on Kedron Road, where General Cleburne commanded the last battle he was to survive. It was here that Union General Luther P. Bradley's Brigade was routed and suffered 350 casualties in their attempt to keep Hood's army from capturing the town and the Union's 800 wagons.

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Rippavilla Mansion:
A restored mansion, formerly the home of Confederate Major Nathaniel Cheairs, which now houses the "Armies of Tennessee Museum."
Major Cheairs was taken prisoner during the capture of Fort Donelson, where he personally was ordered to hand the surrender flag to General Grant. Upon his release, Nathaniel Cheairs returned to his plantation in Spring Hill to find General Forrest and his men camped in his fields in 1863. Though he had taken the oath not to serve against the Union, Nathaniel joined his son, who had been serving on the General's staff, for the remainder of the war.

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The Martin Cheairs Home:

This home is where Confederate General Earl Van Dorn was murdered by a jealous husband, Dr. George Peters, while he was headquartered there in the spring of 1863. The home was built by Martin Cheairs, brother to Nathaniel Cheairs. It is now privately owned by the Tennessee State Orphanage and is located on Highway 51.

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Oaklawn Mansion:
Used as General Hood's headquarters, and the boyhood home of his Colonel Thompson (Chief Surgeon for The Army of Tennessee), this home has been restored and furnished to the Civil War era. It is located off of Kedron Road on Denning Lane.

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The Ewell Farm:

The restored home of General Richard S. Ewell and his wife, the Widow Brown, from 1865 until the general's death. It is now privately owned but may be viewed from the drive-way off of depot street.

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WhiteHall Mansion:
(no photo available) WhiteHall is presently being restored by its current owners and may soon be open to the pulic. It was here that General Earl Van Dorn made his headquarters just prior to moving to The Martin Cheairs home. General Forrest was said to be a frequent visitor. During the Civil War it was the home of Dr. White and it was where some of the casualties of Franklin were brought after the battle. It is located off Mt. Carmel Road, which is off Main Street.

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The McKissack Home:

The girlhood home of the infamous Jessie McKissack Peters, who was said to have been the woman responsible for General Van Dorn's death.

This was also the home in which Union General Thomas Schofield discussed the surrender of his army to General Hood on November 29th 1864. It is located on Highway 31.

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The Spring Hill Cemetery:

There is a stone erected here by the local UDC chapter, which is dedicated to ten unknown soldiers of the Battle of Franklin. Recent research indicates that it could also contain some of the unknown casualties of the Battle of Spring Hill.
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Thompson's Station. to Franklin

Leaving Spring Hill, following both armies on their trek northward, you'll be on Highway 31 North, or the Columbia-to-Franklin Pike.

The first place of note you'll see is Homestead Manor in Thompson's Station.

On March 5 1863 during the battle of Thompsons Station young Alice Thompson was watching the Battle from the basement of "Homestead Manor" and saw the the color bearer of the 3rd Arkansas Infantry fall to the ground. Alice sprang from the cellar, caught up the flag and waved it over her head. Colonel Samual G. Earle, of the Third Arkansas Regiment, saw her and shouted, "Boys a woman has your flag". Upon seeing this heroic action from one of their women, the Rebels raised a great battle cry and drove the Yankees back. While Alice held the flag, a bombshell fell within a few feet, throwing dirt all over her. Fortunately, the shell did not explode. One of the soldiers pushed her back into the cellar. The house also served as a hospital during the battle.


Details:
Homestead Manor is a private residence and not open to the public.
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Thompson's Station:

Thompson's Station was the scene of a battle on March 5, 1863. The principal commanders were: US Col. John Coburn and CS Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn. During the period of inactivity following the Battle of Stones River, Coburn's forces left Franklin to reconnoiter south towards Columbia. Coburn attacked what he presumed to be two Confederate regiments.
Van Dorn seized the initiative, sending Brig. Gen. W. H. "Red" Jackson's dismounted to make a frontal attack while Nathan B. Forrest's Division swept around Coburn's flanks. Jackson carried Coburn's hilltop position and Forrest captured Coburn's wagons as well as blocking the road to Columbia in his rear. Coburn was forced to surrender, resulting in 1,906 Union casualties (most captured) and 300 Confederate casualties. Much of the hard fighting took place around the brick residence of Homestead Manor, and casualties were buried on the property. Thompson's Station is also where Ross's Texas Brigade attempted to halt Schofield's wagon train on November 30, 1864, by attacking and burning some of the wagons before being repulsed by Union artillery

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Continuing north, From Thpson Station you'll see the antebellum home of Laurel Hill. Hood's officers stopped here briefly on their way to Franklin on November 30, 1864.

Laurel Hill

Laurel grew on the lawn and nearby woods. The house was erected in the early 1800s, additions were made as late as 1854. It has thick floors of ash, walnut, and poplar. The front door is solid walnut and the mantels are handcarved. The outstanding feature is the sweeping staircase. .

Details:
Laurel Hill is a private residence and not open to the public.
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Franklin

Harrison Home:
Harrison Home is a short distance north of Laurel Hill, and two miles south of the Carter House. This home served as Hood's headquarters during the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864. Here is where Hood held council with his subordinates; officers Forrest, Cleburne and Cheatham argued against the attack. General John C. Carter was brought here after suffering a mortal wound at Franklin, where he lingered for three days before his death.

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Winstead Hill:

Winstead Hill: From this vantage point (looking northward from Winstead Hill toward the village of Franklin), Hood studied the Union lines and their fortifications with his field glasses. With the bareness of the trees from the season, the Carter house was plainly visible, and the late afternoon sun glinted off the weapons of the entrenched Federals. Turning to Generals Cleburne, Brown and other officers present, he then outlined his battle plan, instructing them where to place their divisions.

Here on the northern face of Winstead Hill, you will find "Brigadiers' Walk," where markers commemorate the five brigadier generals who died at Franklin; Hiram Granbury, States Rights Gist, Otho F. Strahl, John C. Carter (mortally wounded), and John Adams. Most recently, a special monument was erected to honor Maj. Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne.

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Carnton (the McGavock Mansion):
Located on Lewisburg Pike, which runs into Franklin parallel with Columbia Pike, this fine home was once owned by former Nashville Mayor John McGavock. The McGavock home is also the setting used for a new best selling Civil War fiction "The Black Flower." It is operated as a museum and open to the public.

It is said three of the five Confederate generals killed in battle, Cleburne, Adams and Granbury, were brought here to the rear gallery at Carnton and laid out side by side.

Caught up in the path of Gen. A. P. Stewart's advancing columns during the battle, Elizabeth McGavock opened her home to hundreds of wounded and dying Rebels. They filled every room and closet of the home, spilling out into the yard, while surgeons worked feverishly in one of the upstairs bedrooms.

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The Confederate Cemetery at Carnton:
This is the largest private Confederate cemetery in the country. In 1866, the McGavocks designated two acres of their land for the reinterment of 1,500 Southern soldiers killed at Franklin. The graves are laid out by state, with separate areas for unknown. General Johnson K. Duncan, who died of fever in Knoxville, TN in 1862, while serving as Bragg's chief of staff is also buried here.

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Lotz House:
The Lotz House is located directly across the street from the Carter House, and is now a museum featuring an extensive collection of War Between the States and Old West artifacts. The house was built in 1858 by a German immigrant, Johann Lotz. During the Battle of Franklin, the Lotz House represented the center of the Union's entrenched line, dividing part of Col. Emerson Opdyke's brigade as it made the famous counter charge that stemmed the Confederate breakthrough along the Columbia Pike. After the battle, the house was used as a hospital, treating wounded men from both armies.

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The Carter House:
Located on Columbia Pike, this home was built by Fountain Branch Carter in 1830 and sat on the southern edge of the town surrounded by farming fields in 1864. From Winstead Hill to the Carter House represented two miles of open ground that the Army of Tennessee would have to advance across to reach the Federal lines.

The Carter House served as a Federal Command Post while the family hid in the cellar during the hours of battle. Some of the bloodiest hand-to-hand fighting took place in the garden and yard of the home. A smoke house and the small building used as an office by Mr. Carter, are riddled with bullet holes and still stand today -- a testament to what took place there on November 30th, 1864. The Carter House and grounds are open for public tours.
Scarcely had the terrible din of battle subsided when the sad tidings were that Capt. "Tod" Carter lay wounded on the field. By the light of a lantern, he was found mortally wounded by his father and sisters only a few hundred yards from the house. He was then carried gently to his home, his sisters whispering: "Brother's come home at last."

Though receiving medical attention, young "Tod" died 36 hours after he was brought home."It is something which is not always given a soldier," wrote Rev. Henry M. Field, "to draw his last breath under his father's roof, and to be laid in his last sleep beside the dust of his kindred.

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Fort Granger:

Fort Granger is located off of Highway 96, behind the park. It is necessary to park your car and follow a trail to the earthworks, but worth the trip.
Fort Granger, a Union earthen fortification on the Harpeth River near Franklin, was built shortly after middle Tennessee was captured from the Confederacy in early 1862. Named for Gen. Gordon Granger, Union commander in Franklin in 1863, the fort was constructed in March-May of that year by laborers working 24 hours a day.

The fort encompasses 11.76 acres, containing two fortified fronts on the northern and eastern sides. By April 1863, Fort Granger held 18 field guns and two 30-pound siege cannons. The artillery fired through embrasures (openings in the parapet walls). At full capacity, the fort housed 5,194 infantry, 2,728 cavalry, and 24 artillery pieces.

It played an important role in the first Battle of Franklin in May of 1863, which involved General Earl Van Dorn's forces against General Gordon Granger's Union forces that occupied Franklin. Ironically, the same Union General David S. Stanley, who played a vital role in the 1864 Battle of Franklin, would fall upon Van Dorn's flanks and thwart his attempt to take Franklin in 1863.
During the battle on November 30th, 1864, the fort served as a headquarters for General Schofield and held 8,500 soldiers along with 24 guns. Some of the shells from the fort landed on the houses in the town during the battle. Long neglected after the Civil War, the fort was purchased by the City of Franklin in the 1970's but unfortunately, none of the original wooden works survived.


For more info on sites to see in Franklin Visit Save The Franklin Battlefield website: http://www.franklin-stfb.org/
 

ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
34,431
Location
Near Kankakee
Golly Dang, Scone!

What a super fine bit of information! I'm printing it out and putting it on file for the time I get around to exploring Hood's move to Nashville. Thank you so much!

Ole
 

william42

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
1,600
Location
Evansville, Indiana
Great thread Steve: I would like any information you might have on the Chattanooga area, such as if there are any memorials or maybe government designated parks where some of the battles took place. Perhaps on Lookout Mountain there may be Monuments, or places around the city that would possibly be marked where the "cracker line" was, etc. I caught the Mississippi Queen there for a Civil War cruise up the Tennessee river. We stopped at Pittsburg Landing and spent a good part of the day at Shiloh and also Ft. Pillow, but for some reason there was no tour of the Chattanooga area sites. Thanks Steve.

Terry
 

larry_cockerham

Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
10,182
Location
Nashville
Steve, thanks very much for your contribution to middle Tennessee tourism! Some of your descriptions are so realistic, I almost feel I've been there? Maybe we can link up on some more of these sites as I work on tracking the Army of Tennessee.

As for Terry's question about Chattanooga, please rest assured that that particular city is well worth the trip. There is a huge well interpreted park on Lookout Mountain that depicts the 'battle above the clouds' and has a couple of photos of Gen. U.S. Grant in action. The Chickamauga battlefield is nearby in the valley just to the south of Lookout Mountain across the Georgia state line. Missionary Ridge is also in the city and is well documented. Monuments and brochures are abundant and the folks in Chattanooga are more than willing to sell you a beer and a sandwich. Downtown has been renovated along the riverfront and is actually a neat place.
 

larry_cockerham

Southern Gentleman, Lest We Forget, 2011
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
10,182
Location
Nashville
PS Don't forget Nashville in your plans. (We have the airport.) Ft. Negley, built by the US Army 1861-64 has recently been interpreted and opened to the public. Huge stone fort that watched the Confederates attacking from the south. Also Shy's Hill along Battery Lane has been recently interpreted. This site was in the center of the main battle as was nearby Sevier Park and the Battle of Nashville monument site on Granny White Pike. Brookmeade Park at Kelly's Point Battlefield near intersection of Charlotte Pike and I-40 west was the site of Col. D.C. Kelly's artillery battle with five Union gunboats on the Cumberland River a couple of weeks prior to the battle in December 1864. Many buildings remain in downtown that saw hospital duty in the period when Nashville was occupied 1862-65.
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
You guys are jumping the gun on me lol .. Actual we should do a thred like this for each State..

Larry, the info i habe came from diffrent places but will add the nashville bit here as well the Battle of Nashville perseration Sosiety has a wounderfull map on on the battle of nashville as well as the book by Zimmerman..

Terry, I know of a few places in the Chattanooga area. Missionary Ridge , Point park Orchard Knob, Wattache ? "sorry for the spelling " national Cemetery there, there is also a confederate cemetery in the area, Off the top of my head i dont know the link to the National park there but its linked up together with chickamuga. also just over the state line is bridgeport & stevenson alabama.

I shourd have my on Civil war Travel agency lol any volunteers to help get it started?

Kindest regards
Steven
 

dawna

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
1,722
Location
canada
Steven:

As always, thank you for your efforts in supplying such great information.

Dawna
 

william42

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
1,600
Location
Evansville, Indiana
Thanks Steve and Larry. Now that I have the names of some of those places around Chatt. I can get on the internet and get some info. 'Preciate your help very much. Steve don't worry about researching it for me, I can take it from here. Thank you guys again. Take care.

Terry
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
A bigger list of state wide sights

My Pleasure Dawna and Terry.

Look forward to meeting at Motor Mill

Here a bigger list State Some are repeats from the previous post. Some are just pre Civil war Homes. Thjere are others that are not open for tours that i can list in the nashville area.

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Affair At Travisville - Byrdstown
Hwy. 200, 1.5 miles off of Hwy. 127
Byrdstown, TN 38549
Phone: 931-864-7195, 888-406-4704.
Web Site: www.dalehollow.com

In the first military action in Tennessee during the Civil War, Union troops of the 12th Kentucky Cavalry attacked a Confederate encampment at Travisville on Sept. 29, 1861. The 100 Confederate troops refused to surrender.
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Andrew Johnson National Historic Site - Greeneville
College & Depot sts.
Greeneville, TN 37743
Phone: 423-638-3551.

Visitors center, Andrew Johnson's tailor shop, two homes of the former president (one furnished with Andrew Johnson memorabilia), and the National Cemetery.
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Armstrong-lockett House (crescent Bend & W.p. Toms Memorial Gardens) - Knoxville
2728 Kingston Pk.
Knoxville, TN 37919
Phone: 865-637-3163.
Web Site: www.korrnet.org/cresbend

Built in 1834, this historic house is furnished with the Toms Collection of 18th-century furniture and features decorative art and an outstanding collection of English silver. Extensive formal Italian gardens from house to river.
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Ashland City "historic Cheatham County Square" - Ashland City
100 Public Square
Ashland City, TN 37015
Phone: 615-792-4316

The two-story brick courthouse was completed in 1857.
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Battle Of Parkers Crossroads
Self-guided Driving Tour - Parkers Crossroads
I-40 & Hwy. 22, Exit 108
Parkers Crossroads, TN 38388
Phone: 731-968-4225.

Self-guided seven-stop driving tour designed to provide a complete view of the Parkers Crossroads Civil War Battlefield.
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Beech Grove Confederate Cemetery & Park - Beech Grove
Beech Grove, TN
Phone: 931-455-9500.

This is the beginning tour spot of the 130-mile Tullahoma Campaign Civil War Driving Trail. Beech Grove is the first Confederate Cemetery in the South. Home of Hoover's Gap Civil War Battlefield. Water and bathhouse facilities available.
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Belle Meade Plantation - Nashville
5025 Harding Rd.
Nashville, TN 37205
Phone: 800-270-3991.
Web Site: www.bellemeadeplantation.com
Email: bellemeade@home.com

"Queen of Tennessee Plantations." A 19th-century thoroughbred stud farm, antebellum mansion, carriage house, antique carriages, eight outbuildings, visitors center, cafe and costumed guides. Groups welcome. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.
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Belmont Mansion - Nashville
Located on Belmont University campus
Nashville, TN 37212
Phone: 615-460-5459.
Web Site: www.belmontmansion.com

Guided tours of this 1850 Victorian mansion, home of Adelicia Acklen, one of the wealthiest women of 19th-century America. Call for hours. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.
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Bethel Civil War Cemetery - Knoxville
1711 Dandridge Ave.
Knoxville, TN 37915
Phone: 865-522-8661.
Web Site: www.korrnet.org/mabry

One of the largest privately owned Civil War cemeteries, where 1,600-plus Confederate soldiers and 50 Federal prisoner-of-war soldiers are buried.
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Big Hill Pond State Park - Pocahontas
Rt. 1, Box 150B
Pocahontas, TN 38061
Phone: 901-645-7967
Web Site: www.tnstateparks.com

Scene of the Battle of Davis Bridge, fought October 5, 1862.
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Bills-mcneal Historic District - Bolivar
Bills & McNeal St.
Bolivar, TN 38008
Phone: 731-658-6554 (C of C).

Contains the 1854 McNeal House, The Pillars (1820s), the Columns (1860s) plus several other outstanding structures, as well as the Polk Cemetery.
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Blair-moore House B&b - Jonesborough
201 W. Main St.
Jonesborough, TN 37659
Phone: 423-753-0044, 888-453-0044.
Web Site: www.bbonline.com/tn/blair-moore
Email: blairmoorehouse@aol.com

Circa 1832 home listed on National Register of Historic Places. All rooms have private bathrooms and porches. Elegant, full, gourmet breakfast; private, off-street parking; central heat & air; English-style gardens; no smoking.
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Bledsoe's Fort Historic Park - Castalian Springs
State Hwy. 25
Castalian Springs, TN 37031
Phone: 615-452-5463.

An 80-acre park that encompasses the archaeological site of Isaac Bledsoe's fort (ca. 1780s). Nathaniel Parker 1790s log cabin. Hugh Rogan 1790s stone, "Irish" cottage. Avery Trace first wagon road from Clinch Mountain to Middle Tennessee. Cavern of the Skulls.
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Blockade Runner - Wartrace
1027 Bell Buckle Rd.
Wartrace, TN 37183
Phone: 931-389-6294.
Web Site: www.blockaderunner.com

The largest Civil War seller in the South. Uniforms, tents, muskets, leather, ladies dresses, hoops and more. Museum open Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
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Blount Mansion - Knoxville
200 W. Hill Ave.
Knoxville, TN 37902
Phone: 865-525-2375, 888-654-0016.
Web Site: www.blountmansion.org

Blount Mansion, built in 1792, was the residence of Gov. William Blount, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, and drafter of the Tennessee Constitution.
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Bolivar Historic District/hardeman Co. Chamber - Bolivar
500 W. Market St. (Hardeman County C of C)
Bolivar, TN 38008
Phone: 731-658-6554.

The Little Courthouse Museum and The Pillars open on request for guided tours. Annual spring tour of homes. Walking tour information. One hundred buildings on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Britton Lane Battlefield - Denmark
280 Britton Ln.
Denmark, TN 38391
Phone: 731-935-2209.

Battle site contains a log cabin that was once used as a hospital. A monument marks the mass grave of Confederate soldiers.
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Brown-daly-horne House (colonial Bank Of Tennessee) - Pulaski
307 W. Madison
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-1582.

Built in 1855 and purchased by Gov. John C. Brown in 1869. One of the best examples of Queen Anne architecture in the state.
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Cannonsburgh Village - Murfreesboro
312 S. Front St.
Murfreesboro, TN 37130
Phone: 615-890-0355.

Cannonsburgh, the original name of Murfreesboro, is a reconstructed Southern village consisting of a one-room schoolhouse, chapel, gristmill, a working blacksmith's shop, doctor's office, world's largest cedar bucket and much more.
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Chattanooga Veterans Administration National Cemetery - Chattanooga
1200 Bailey Ave.
Chattanooga, TN 37404
Phone: 423-855-6590.
Web Site: www.cem.va.gov

Over 12,000 Union soldiers were reinterred in this cemetery from the many battle sites throughout the Chattanooga area. The most notable interments are those of the famed "Andrews' Raiders," four of whom received the first Congressional Medal of Honor decorations.
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Chickamauga-chattanooga National Military Park/point Park - Lookout Mountain
E. Brow Rd.
Lookout Mountain, TN 37350
Phone: 423-821-7786.

Commemorates significant Civil War battles of Chickamauga and Chattanooga in the fall of 1863. Portions of battlefields of Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge are preserved and interpreted.
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City Of Lebanon Museum And History Center - Lebanon
200 Castle Heights Ave. N.
Lebanon, TN 37087
Phone: 615-443-2839.
Web Site: www.lebanon-tn.com

Walk through the history of Lebanon from prehistoric to modern times. Audio descriptions by famous residents introduce visitors to the periods on display. Research and view additional historical information in the history center via touch-screen and computers. Weekdays 8-4.
=========================

Civil War Tour/battle Of Hartsville Preservation - Hartsville
240 Broadway
Hartsville, TN 37074
Phone: 615-374-9243 (C of C).

Self-guided tour includes 17 stops related to Gen. John Hunt Morgan and the Battle of Hartsville. Brochure and map available at the chamber office.

=========================

Cold Springs School Museum - Portland
Portland, TN 37148
Phone: 615-325-3443 (Highland Rim Historical Society).

One-room schoolhouse serves as museum of local history. Collection of books, old photographs, and Civil War and Bicentennial memorabilia.

=========================

Collierville Historic Town Square - Collierville
125 N. Rowlett St.
Collierville, TN 38017
Phone: 901-853-1666 or 853-3200

Walking tour brochures available. Tour includes the town's original stagecoach stop.

=========================

Confederate Memorial Hall (bleak House) - Knoxville
3148 Kingston Pk.
Knoxville, TN 37919
Phone: 865-522-2371.
Web Site: www.korrnet.org/cmh
Email: bhpa@korrnet.org

Built in 1858, the Bleak House served as Confederate Gen. James Longstreet's headquarters in 1863. One of Knoxville's best-preserved landmarks, it houses an important museum and historic library.
=========================

Confederate Memorial Park At Winstead Hill - Franklin
Columbia Pike (Hwy. 31 S.)
Franklin, TN
Phone: 615-833-8977.

A Confederate memorial park with monuments, historical markers, cannon, an overlook and 3-D map of the Franklin battlefield located on Winstead Hill. Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood's headquarters during the Battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, 1864.

=========================

Court Square Historic District (bolivar) - Bolivar
Court Square
Bolivar, TN 38008
Phone: 731-658-6554 (C of C).

The first historic district established in Bolivar. Structures include the 1869 courthouse, The Little Courthouse (1824), and commercial buildings from 1800s to present.

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Cowan Railroad Museum - Cowan
Front St.
Cowan, TN 37318
Phone: 931-967-7365.

Nestled in the foothills of the Cumberland Mountains. Restored depot, steam locomotive, caboose and relics. Donations accepted.

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Cumberland Furnace Historic District - Cumberland Furnace
Hwy. 48 N.
Cumberland Furnace, TN 37051
Phone: 615-446-2349.
Web Site: www.dicksonchamber.citysearch.com
Email: geojax@juno.com


On the National Register of Historic Places. Dickson County's oldest community, home of the first iron plantation in middle Tennessee. The village still has over 30 buildings related to the iron industry.

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Cumberland Gap National Historical Park - Cumberland Gap
Hwy. 25 E.
Cumberland Gap, TN
Phone: 606-248-2817.
Web Site: www.nps.gov/cuga

Journey back into history, trace the footsteps of Daniel Boone and discover spectacular views and incredible scenery. Located where the borders of Tennessee, Kentucky and Virginia meet.

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Davis Bridge Memorial Foundation Inc. - Bolivar
1250 Clifft Rd.
Bolivar, TN 38008
Phone: 731-658-6554.
Web Site: www.gointer.net/remembrance

Monument and interpretative markers for the Battle of Davis Bridge Oct. 5, 1862, which was the second largest Civil War battle fought in West Tennessee.

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Dickson Williams Mansion - Greeneville
108 N. Irish St.
Greeneville, TN 37743
Phone: 423-638-4111.

One of the prime examples of Federal architecture in Tennessee, the mansion was built in 1797 by Greeneville's first postmaster, William Dickson. During the Civil War, the mansion served as officers' quarters for both Confederate and Union troops. It was on Sep. 4, 1864, that Gen. John Hunt Morgan, the famous "Rebel Raider," was killed in the garden. Many original furnishings are in the house. Admission is $5.00 each and by appointment only.

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Downtown Historic Hartsville - Hartsville
Hartsville, TN
Phone: 615-374-9243 (C of C).

Victorian commercial buildings and gazebo presided over by Trousdale County Courthouse.
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East Tennessee Historical Society Museum - Knoxville
600 Market St.
Knoxville, TN 37902
Phone: 865-215-8830.
Web Site: www.east-tennessee-history.org
Email: eths@east-tennessee-history.org

Museum highlights two centuries of settlement, pioneering and progress in the region's history. Artifacts, documents and personal possessions represent a variety of topics including Davy Crockett, the Civil War, the birth of country music and regional arts.
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Elm Springs - Columbia
740 Mooresville Pike
Columbia, TN 38401
Phone: 931-380-1844.

Elm Springs is a Greek Revival mansion built in 1837 by Maury County's master builder, Nathan Vaught. It is on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Emerald Hill Mansion - Clarksville
751 N. 2nd St.
Clarksville, TN 37040
Phone: 931-221-7979.
Web Site: www.apsu.edu

This original 1820s farmhouse-turned-mansion features many original furnishings. After two major renovations, the structure now serves as the APSU Pace Alumni Center and Development Offices.
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Fiddler's Grove Historical Village - Lebanon
945 Baddour Pkwy.
Lebanon, TN 37087
Phone: 615-443-2626.

Village of more than 30 structures, original and replicated, with local historical significance. Self-guided and guided tours available.

=========================

Fort Defiance - Clarksville
New Providence
Clarksville, TN
Phone: 931-648-5780.
Email: cvillemuse@aol.com

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The well-preserved Civil War fortification of earthen ramparts overlooks the Cumberland and Red rivers and the town of Clarksville.
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Fort Donelson National Battlefield - Dover
174 National Cemetery Dr.
Dover, TN 37058
Phone: 931-232-5706.

Site of the first major Union victory during the Civil War. The earthen fort, river batteries, outer earthworks, Dover Hotel and National Cemetery are preserved and accessible by a six-mile self-guided auto tour.
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Fort Donelson National Cemetery - Dover
W. Church St.
Dover, TN 37058

Established in 1867 for burial of Union soldiers after the battle of Fort Donelson in 1862. Since the Civil War there have been interments representing all wars, with the exception of the Gulf War.
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Fort Granger - Franklin
Pinkerton Park
Franklin, TN 37064
Phone: 615-791-3217.

The fort was attacked on Nov. 30, 1864, over a year after it was built.

=========================
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
=========================

Fort Pillow State Park - Henning
3122 Park Rd.
Henning, TN 38041
Phone: 901-738-5581
Web Site: www.tnstateparks.com

The 1,646-acre Fort Pillow is rich in both historical and archaeological significance.
=========================

Fortress Rosecrans - Murfreesboro
Old Fort Park at Golf Ln.
Murfreesboro, TN 37129
Phone: 615-893-9501.

In early 1863, following the Battle of Stones River, the Union troops occupying Murfreesboro constructed Fortress Rosecrans, the largest earthen fort of its kind built during the Civil War.
.
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Giles County Historic Site Tour - Pulaski
100 S. 2nd St.
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-3789.

Driving tour of historic homes and sites over the entire county.
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Giles County Historical Museum - Pulaski
122 S. 2nd St.
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-2720.

Museum contains Civil War and general history items from Indian days in Giles County to the present time. Open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Wed.; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Fri.-Sat.; 2-4 p.m. Sun.
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Hawkins County Courthouse - Rogersville
Courthouse Sq., 100 E. Main St.
Rogersville, TN 37857
Phone: 423-272-2186.
Web Site: www.welcome.to/hawkinscounty

Oldest original courthouse in Tennessee, built in 1836. One of the most photographed in the South.

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Historic Carnton Plantation - Franklin
1345 Carnton Ln.
Franklin, TN 37064
Phone: 615-794-0903.

Antebellum plantation served as a field hospital during the Civil War Battle of Franklin. The largest private Confederate cemetery is adjacent to the grounds. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.
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Historic Chockley Inn - Wartrace
111 Spring St.
Wartrace, TN 37183
Phone: 931-389-0545.
Web Site: www.hometown.aol.com/mschockley/
Email: mschockley@aol.com

Historic Chockley Tavern's period costumed staff host private parties and serve group travel tours, 10-47, featuring authentic Civil War entertainment, 19th-century gifts and garden.
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Historic Collinsville - Southside
4711 Weakley Rd.
Southside, TN 37171
Phone: 931-648-9141.
Web Site: www.historiccollinsville.com

Living history museum features authentically restored log houses and outbuildings from 1838 to 1870. Docents in period costumes demonstrate music, work and play activities. Call for seasonal hours and special event dates.

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Historic Downtown Franklin - Franklin
Main St. & Historic District
Franklin, TN 37064
Phone: 615-591-8500.
Email: sspragins@historicfranklin.com

Specialty shops, restaurants and antique stores. Downtown Franklin Association sponsors Main Street Festival in April, Pumpkinfest in fall, Dickens of a Christmas in December.
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Historic Downtown Gallatin - Gallatin
Public Sq.
Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-452-5692.

Public square and courthouse in downtown Gallatin with more than 25 restored buildings, many predating the Civil War.
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Historic Downtown Greeneville - Greeneville
115 Academy St.
Greeneville, TN 37743
Phone: 423-638-4111.
Web Site: www.gcp.xtn.net
Email: kinser@xtn.net

Self-guided walking tours offer a view of over 25 historic structures including a replica of the capitol of the "Lost State of Franklin" (1785-1788), when Greeneville was the seat of government. The district is on the National Register of Historic Places. Fees to some historic sites; please call for information.
=========================

Historic Elmwood Cemetery - Memphis
824 S. Dudley St.
Memphis, TN 38104
Phone: 901-774-3212.
Web Site: www.elmwoodcemetery.org

Founded in 1852, 70,000 of the most interesting people are buried here. Civil War site, award-winning cottage, gardens and grounds.

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Homeplace-1850, A Living History Museum - Golden Pond
100 Van Morgan Drive
Golden Pond, KY
Phone: 931-232-6457

A working farm of the mid-1800s located in TVA's 170,000-acre Land Between the Lakes. Free.
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Humphreys County Museum & Civil War Fort - Waverly
201 Fort Hill Dr.
Waverly, TN 37185
Phone: 931-296-1099.

Restored 1920s mansion houses historical memorabilia. Located behind property is Civil War fort complete with well-preserved rifle pit. Open Thu.-Sun. 1-4 p.m.

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James K. Polk Ancestral Home - Columbia
301 W. 7th St.
Columbia, TN 38401
Phone: 931-388-2354.
Web Site: www.jameskpolk.com

The 11th president, James K. Polk, began his legal and political career from this home built by his parents in 1816. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.

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Johnsonville State Historic Area - New Johnsonville
200 Museum Ln.
New Johnsonville, TN 37185
Phone: 931-535-2789

Site of the 1864 Civil War Battle of Johnsonville. Museum, Union redoubts, fortifications and rifle pits are still visible on the site.
=========================


Mabry-hazen House Museum - Knoxville
1711 Dandridge Ave.
Knoxville, TN 37915
Phone: 865-522-8661.
Web Site: www.korrnet.org/mabry

Stately, elegant home of the Victorian and Civil War periods showcases a large collection of original artifacts including china, silver, crystal and antique furnishings. Housing three generations of the same family from 1858 to1987, this home served as headquarters for both Union and Confederate troops. Site also includes 4-acre Bethel Civil War cemetery, and is listed on the National Register.
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Mcminn County Living Heritage Museum - Athens
522 W. Madison Ave.
Athens, TN 37303
Phone: 423-745-0329.
Web Site: www.usit.com/livher
Email: livher@usit.net

Thirty permanent exhibits tracing the area's history from the Cherokee Indians and early settlers through the 1940s and industrialization. Bimonthly changing exhibits.
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Mcphail Office - Franklin
209 E. Main St.
Franklin, TN 37064
Phone: 615-790-0378.
Web Site: www.williamsoncvb.org

Once used by Union generals as a headquarters, the office now serves as a visitors information center.
=========================

Monthaven - Hendersonville
1154 W. Main St.
Hendersonville, TN 37075
Phone: 615-822-0789.

Historic home dating back to 1860s houses the Hendersonville Arts Council with local photography, crafts, visual arts shows and gift shop.
=========================

Mount Pleasant/maury Phosphate Museum - Mount Pleasant
108 Public Sq.
Mount Pleasant, TN 38474
Phone: 931-379-9511.

Fossils, Indian artifacts, Bigby Grey Confederate flag and Civil War artifacts, local history, phosphate history, old farm tools, and special displays each quarter.
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Nashville Citywalk - Nashville
Downtown
Nashville, TN 37202
Phone: 615-862-7970.

A self-guided walking tour of 15 historic sites in downtown Nashville.
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National Medal Of Honor Museum Of Military History - Chattanooga
400 Georgia Ave.
Chattanooga, TN 37403
Phone: 423-267-1737.
Web Site: www.smoky.com/medalofhonor/

Nonprofit museum sharing the history and preserving the memory of those who served in America's military conflicts from the Revolutionary War through today. Contributions accepted.

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Oaklands Historic House Museum - Murfreesboro
900 N. Maney Ave.
Murfreesboro, TN 37130
Phone: 615-893-0022.

Antebellum plantation house built in four phases from about 1815 to 1860. Restored with original and period furnishings. Site of Nathan Bedford Forrest's raid on Murfreesboro in July 1862 and the visit of Jefferson Davis in December 1862.
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Old Graveyard Memorial Park - Pulaski
100 S. 2nd St.
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-3789.
Web Site: www.gilescountychamber.com
Email: gilescofc@usit.net

Dedicated in 1969, was a pilot project in urban beautification. The old city cemetery used from 1817 to 1883.
=========================

Old Gray Cemetery - Knoxville
543 N. Broadway
Knoxville, TN 37917
Phone: 865-522-1424.
Email: oldgray@korrnet.org

On the National Register of Historic Places, the 1850 cemetery was first to follow garden movement design.
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Pulaski Historic Square - Pulaski
100 S. 2nd St.
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-3789 (C of C).

On the National Register of Historic Places. Contains a statue of Sam Davis, the young Confederate scout who was captured and executed in Pulaski in 1863.
=========================

Rattle & Snap Plantation - Mount Pleasant
State Hwy. 243
Mount Pleasant, TN
Phone: 931-379-5861, 800-258-3875.
Web Site: www.rattleandsnap.com
Email: aevans@edge.net

A national historic landmark, Rattle & Snap was built in 1845 and has been restored to museum quality with furnishings of the period. Luncheons by reservation. Gift shop. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.

=========================
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Rippavilla Plantation - Spring Hill
5700 Main St.
Spring Hill, TN 37174
Phone: 931-486-9037.
Email: rippavilla@charter.net

Beautifully restored 1855 plantation home and gardens. Includes log Freedman's Bureau School, slave house, horse and mule museum, and 1806 log homestead re-creation. Site of Gen. John Bell Hood's war council breakfast, 1864, before Battle of Franklin. Located on the Spring Hill Battlefield.
=========================

Rutherford County Courthouse And East Main Street Historic District - Murfreesboro
Public Square
Murfreesboro, TN 37130
Phone: 615-895-1887.
Web Site: www.dnj.com/mainstreet

Located on Murfreesboro's downtown square, the courthouse served as Tennessee's State Capitol from 1819 until 1826. After a fire destroyed the original courthouse, the present structure was rebuilt in 1859. Walking tour maps are available at the Chamber of Commerce and the courthouse.
=========================

Salem Cemetery Battlefied - Jackson
58 Cotton Grove Rd.
Jackson, TN 38313
Phone: 731-424-1279.

Salem Cemetery is the site of a Civil War battle, fought Dec. 19, 1862. Self-guided tour.
=========================

Sam Davis Home - Smyrna
1399 Sam Davis Rd.
Smyrna, TN 37167
Phone: 615-459-2341, 888-750-9524.
Web Site: www.samdavishome.org
Email: bethawk@earthlink.net

A historic house museum situated on 168 acres dedicated to the 21-year-old Tennessee hero Sam Davis, who was captured and executed as a spy for refusing to reveal information to Union forces.
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Sam Davis Museum & Trail - Pulaski
134 Sam Davis Ave.
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-3789 (C of C).

Self-guided tour of sites relating to the capture and hanging of "Boy Hero of the Confederacy," beginning on public square at monument, ending at museum site where Davis was executed.
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Savannah Historic Trail - Savannah
Downtown
Savannah, TN 38372
Phone: 731-925-2364 (Hardin Co. CVB), 800-552-3866.
Web Site: www.tourhardincnty.org

Savannah's historic trail includes historic markers, reader boards, scenic overlooks of the Tennessee River, walkways and seating areas focusing on the town's Civil War history, Queen and Alex Haley, Native Americans and the Trail of Tears. Brochure available at Tennessee River Museum.
=========================

Sergeant Alvin C. York State Historic Park - Pall Mall
U.S. Hwy. 127
Pall Mall, TN 38577
Phone: 931-879-4026

Tribute to one of the most decorated soldiers of World War I. The site includes the York home, gravesite, school, family farm, gristmill and York Mill Park.
=========================

Sevier County Heritage Museum - Sevierville
167 Bruce St.
Sevierville, TN 37862
Phone: 865-453-4058.

On the National Register of Historic Places, the Old Sevierville Post Office houses artifacts of Sevier County from the earliest settlers to World War II.
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Sevier Station - Clarksville
Walker St., New Providence
Clarksville, TN
Phone: 931-648-5780.
Email: cvillemuse@aol.com

The oldest-known standing structure in Montgomery County, built in 1792 by one of the first settlers in Clarksville, Valentine Sevier.
=========================

Shiloh National Military Park - Shiloh
1055 Pittsburg Landing Rd.
Shiloh, TN 38376
Phone: 731-689-5275.

150 monuments, 217 cannons and over 450 historic markers, scattered over 4,000 acres, commemorate this major Civil War battle. Visitor center, bookstore, picnic area, national cemetery and the Shiloh Indian Mounds National Historic Landmark.
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Spring Hill Battlefield - Spring Hill
Kedron Rd.
Spring Hill, TN 37174
Phone: 931-486-9037.

Interpretative walking trail at site of one of the most controversial events of the Civil War.
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Stones River National Battlefield - Murfreesboro
3501 Old Nashville Hwy.
Murfreesboro, TN 37129
Phone: 615-893-9501.
Web Site: www.nps.gov/stri
Email: stri-information@nps.gov

This 600-acre area commemorating the Civil War Battle of Stones River includes a National Cemetery, remnants of Fortress Rosecrans, and the oldest intact Civil War monument.
=========================

Sumner County Museum - Gallatin
183 W. Main St.
Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-451-3738.

Displays of over 250,000 artifacts covering three floors. Includes Native American, pioneer and early settlers? tools and weapons, antique toys and cars, and African-American displays.
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Surrender House/dover Hotel - Dover
Petty St.
Dover, TN 37058
Phone: 931-232-5706.

Located at the Fort Donelson National Battlefield. Historic site of the formal, unconditional surrender of Fort Donelson by Gen. Buckner to Gen. Grant on Feb. 16, 1862.
=========================

Tennessee Civil War Museum - Chattanooga
3914 St. Elmo Ave.
Chattanooga, TN 37409
Phone: 423-821-4954.
Web Site: www.tncivilwarmuseum.com

With exhibits created by Smithsonian designers, films developed by History Channel documentarians, and a million-dollar collection of artifacts, the Tennessee Civil War Museum provides a state-of-the-art look at the War Between the States. Guided tours and group rates are available.
=========================

Tennessee State Library & Archives - Nashville
403 Seventh Ave. N.
Nashville, TN 37243
Phone: 615-741-2464.
Web Site: www.state.tn.us/sos/statelib/tsla.home.htm

By authority of Tennessee Code Annotated, collects and preserves books and records of historical, documentary and reference value, and encourages and promotes library development throughout the state.
=========================

Tennessee State Museum - Nashville
5th & Deaderick
Nashville, TN 37243
Phone: 615-741-2692.
Web Site: www.tnmuseum.org

Over 60,000 square feet of exhibits on the state's history, beginning 12,000 years ago and continuing through the early 1900s. Large sections on prehistoric Indians and Civil War objects. Changing gallery features temporary exhibits on arts and history.
=========================

The Athenaeum Rectory - Columbia
808 Athenaeum St.
Columbia, TN 38401
Phone: 931-381-4822.
Web Site: www.athenaeumrectory.com

Served as rectory for the prestigious Athenaeum Rectory School for Young Ladies, which operated 1851-1905. Member of Polk Places of Maury County.
=========================

The Battles For Chattanooga Electric Map And Museum - Lookout Mountain
1110 E. Brow Rd.
Lookout Mountain, TN 37350
Phone: 423-821-2812.
Web Site: www.battlesforchattanooga.com

This re-creation of the battles that sealed the fate of the Confederacy appeals to all ages and provides an excellent overview of this important period in our nation's history. Gift shop. Group rates available.
=========================

The Carter House - Franklin
1140 Columbia Ave.
Franklin, TN 37064
Phone: 615-791-1861.
Web Site: www.carter-house.org

The Carter House, built in 1830, was located in the center of the Battle of Franklin. One of the 9,000 casualties was Capt. Tod Carter, son of the family. Admission includes a video, museum and guided tour.
=========================

The Crossville Depot - Crossville
14 North St.
Crossville, TN 38555
Phone: 931-456-2586.

This 1926 renovated depot is a historical landmark, as it was the site of Alvin C. York's return from WWI. Includes collection of local train memorabilia. Gift shop. Open daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m. except Sundays.
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The Hermitage: Home Of President Andrew Jackson - Hermitage
4580 Rachel's Ln.
Hermitage, TN 37076
Phone: 615-889-2941
Web Site: www.thehermitage.com

The home of our nation's seventh president as it appeared in 1837. Restored mansion, garden, Jackson's tomb, original log cabins, and changing museum exhibits. Watch archaeologist at work in the summer months. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.
=========================

The Homeplace-1850, A Living History Museum - Golden Pond
100 Van Morgan Dr.
Golden Pond, KY
Phone: 931-232-6457
Web Site: www.lbl.org

Living-history farm which recreates life in mid-19th century. Authentic houses and barns, interpreters in period clothing, and demonstrations of daily chores bring the site to life. Ages four and under free.
=========================

The Inn At Evins Mill - Smithville
1535 Evins Mill Rd.
Smithville, TN 37166
Phone: 615-269-3740, 800-383-2349.
Web Site: www.evinsmill.com

Scenic retreat featuring Carmac Falls, historic gristmill, gourmet cuisine, award-winning accommodations and state-of-the-art meeting facilities. Ideal for meetings, weekend travel and weddings.
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The Thomas House - Red Boiling Springs
520 E. Main St.
Red Boiling Springs, TN 37150
Phone: 615-699-3006.

=========================

Thomas Martin House (community Bank) - Pulaski
302 S. 2nd St.
Pulaski, TN 38478
Phone: 931-363-3830.

Built in 1842 by Thomas Martin, prominent businessman and founder of Martin College. Served as home of the splendid Richardson Hotel in the early 1900s.
=========================

Town Of Cumberland Gap - Cumberland Gap
330 Colwyn St.
Cumberland Gap, TN 37724
Phone: 423-869-3660 (C of C).

Historical town with a spectacular view of the Cumberland Mountains. Unique shops, restaurants and lodging.
=========================

Travellers Rest Plantation - Nashville
636 Farrell Pkwy.
Nashville, TN 37220
Phone: 615-832-8197.
Web Site: www.travellersrestplantation.org

Built in 1799, this is the oldest home open to the public in Nashville, offering visitors 1,000 years of Tennessee history. Prehistoric Native American village and burial site as well as Civil War headquarters. Tennessee Antebellum Trail member.
=========================

Trousdale Place - Gallatin
810 W. Main St.
Gallatin, TN 37066
Phone: 615-452-5648, 615-452-1404.

Historic home of Tennessee Gov. William Trousdale (1849-1851) contains authentic Trousdale furniture and historic Confederate library. Located two blocks from town square. Parking area. Please call ahead.
=========================

University Of The South - Sewanee
735 University Ave.
Sewanee, TN 37383
Phone: 931-598-1286.

Nationally ranked, independent liberal arts university - also referred to as "Sewanee." The beautiful mountaintop campus has Gothic buildings in native sandstone in the style of Oxford and Cambridge universities. Sights include All Saints' Chapel, Memorial Cross, Green's View Overlook and Abbott Martin Ravine Gardens.
=========================
 

william42

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
1,600
Location
Evansville, Indiana
Steve, I have yet to read any book on the battles of Franklin and Nashville. I know there are plenty out there. Is there one particular book that you might recommend that covers both battles, or is there a particular book on each one individually that you would recommend? I've only read of those battles when they're included in a full history of the war. Thanks.

Terry
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Terry.

There is a Wonderfull new book out on the battle of Spring by Jamie Gillum:
The Battle of Spring Hill - Twenty-five hours ... to tragedy.
on the
A wonderfull boolk Campaign itself is The Confederacy's last Hurrah: the battles of Spring hill Franklin & Nashville by Wilet sword.

Sword Book is good but is anti John bell hood. If you you can read it with a open mind its a great read.

Two other books i highly recomend is Eyewitness at the Battle of Franklin & Eyewitness at the Battle of Nashville by David R Logsdon.

Its Qoutes and excerts from Diarys and reports of the battles from the solders and the civilians.

I Found my list of places From franklin to Nasville along Hwy 31..

In the Town of Franklin - Visit the Williamson County Convention & Visitors Bureau there to get info on the numerous buildings in Franklin and Willianson County that were standing during the war.. The McPhail Dr. Office (1839), the Marshall House(1805), the Rainey House(1839), Clouston Hall (1830) the Maney House (1829), the Courtney House (1840) and the Williamson County Courthouse (1859)

Many of the these were used as hospitals after the battle of Franklin as was the the Mosonic lodge which also damaged by cannon s on the retreat from Nashville.

Alot of the homes are closed to the public because they are private homes but you can still admmire there beauty form the sidewalk..

And If you want to continue on to Nashville there are several period home and markers along HWY 31.acroos the Harpeth River is The Truett House (1846) ;

Jamsnin Grove (1859) - Legend has it that a young federal soldier fell in love with his nurse , returned after the war and etched his name on a pane of glass.

Aspen Grove ( 1834), Isola bella (1840); Ashlawn ( 1830); Mountview (1860) ; Green Pasture (1840) & Midway

Midway - served as headquaters to boh armies during the war.

But there is a Battle of Nashville Driving Tour on the Battle of Nashville Preservation Society and Civil War Roundtable website, BONPS

Shy’s Hill during the Battle of Nashville that Federal troops finally broke the Confederate line on the left flank, resulting in a massive Rebel retreat and a decisive Union victory.

Today the hill sits in residential suburban Nashville, marked with a state historical marker. Steps lead up the steep incline to the crest of the heavily wooded hill. The Confederate defensive fortifications, still visible, were placed too far up the hill, allowing the Federals to climb the hill out of harm’s way.

Traveller's Rest: General John Bell Hood used Traveller's Rest as his headquarters from the 1st-16th of December, 1864. During the Battle of Nashville, the kitchen was so severly damaged that it had to be torn down.

Fort Negley was part of a chain of fortifications built by occupying Union forces in 1862. The guns of Fort Negley opened the Battle of Nashville on December 14,1864.

Belmont Mansion
Union scouts used the 105-foot-tall brick water tower, which still exists, as a lookout point and to relay signals. The mansion served as the headquarters for Union Gen. T.J. Wood during the battle of Nashville.

Belle Meade Mansion
During The Battle of Nashville, Brig. Gen. James Chalmers of Forrest's Cavalry located his headquarters here. During a skirmish on the front lawn, the mistress of the house was said to come out and rally Confederates by waving her hankerchief amidst the flying bullets. The columns still bear the scars of the bullets.

Nashville Old City Cemetery
Civil War casualties buried here: The bloody battles of Shiloh in April 1862 and Stones River in early 1863 filled Nashville's makeshift hospitals to overflowing. Undertaker W.R. Cornelius, who had the Federal contract for burials, buried Federal and Confederate dead separately at the City Cemetery. More than 15,000 were interred in the open field to the southwest of the cemetery. Blacks who fought for the Union were buried at a distance. In 1867, when the Nashville National Cemetery was dedicated, all of the Union dead were relocated and buried together there. It should be noted that most of the Confederate soldiers killed during the Battle of Nashville were buried at Confederate Circle in Mt. Olivet Cemetery.

Gen. Bushrod Johnson:
An Ohio native and West Point graduate, Bushrod Johnson served as head of the military department at the University of Nashville before the Civil War. He purchased a lot for $20 in 1858 and buried his wife Martha there. An able commander during the war, he died in 1880 in Ohio and was buried there. In 1975, he was returned to Nashville to lie beside his wife at the City Cemetery, following an impressive military service.

Gen. Felix Zollicoffer:
A newspaper editor and politician in Nashville, Zollicoffer led Confederate troops in East Tennessee at the beginning of the war and was shot and killed at the Battle of Mill Springs (Fishing Creek), Ky. on Jan. 19, 1862. He is buried with his wife at the City Cemetery.

Gen. Richard Ewell:
Known as "Old Baldy," Ewell commanded Confederate troops in the Eastern Theater, including the Battle of Gettysburg. During the war, he married Lizinka Campbell Brown of Nashville, and after the war they retired to Spring Hill, Tenn. They both died in January 1872 and are buried together at City Cemetery on the lot of her parents, George Washington and Harriet Stoddart Campbell.

Lt. Andrew Willis Gould:
Lt. Gould was stabbed to death June 26, 2863 in Columbia, Tenn. by his commanding officer, Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, during an altercation. Forrest was shot and wounded.

Nashville National Military Cemetery
The was established as a U.S. Military Cemetery on Jan. 28, 1867. The Roll of Honor, No. XXII, dated July 31, 1869, submitted to Quartermaster General’s Office, U.S.A., Washington, D.C., recorded the graves of 16,485 Union soldiers interred in the national cemetery at Nashville, Tennessee and remains as a part of the cemetery’s historical records.

Originally there were 16,489 interments (burials) of known soldiers and employees: 38 were officers, 10,300 were white soldiers, 1,447 were colored soldiers, and 703 were employees.

Among the unknown, there were 3,098 white soldiers, 463 colored soldiers and 29 employees. The deceased had been gathered from an extensive region of Middle Tennessee and southern Kentucky. The number of distinct burial places from which these bodies were taken is 251.

A very large proportion of the dead in the cemetery, however, were transferred from the hospital burial grounds in and around the city of Nashville and from temporary burial grounds around general hospitals in Nashville and nearby battlefields of Franklin and Gallatin, Tenn. Reinterments were also made from Bowling Green and Cave City, Ky.

During the Civil War, if marked at all, wooden headboards with the names and identifying data painted thereon marked graves of those who died in general hospitals, on the battlefields, or as prisoners of war. Many of these headboards deteriorated through exposure to the elements. The result was that when the remains were later removed for burial to a national cemetery, identifications could not be established, and the gravesites were marked as unknown.

NOTABLE MONUMENTS, MARKERS:
One of the oldest private markers in the cemetery is a spire located in Section M, Grave 16234, which was dedicated to the memory of James A. Leonard of the 1st Kansas Battery. He was killed by guerillas on Jan. 23, 1864 and interred on Jan. 27, 1864.

In 1920, the State of Minnesota erected a monument in Section MM inscribed, “In memory of her soliders here buried who lost their lives in the service of the United States in war for Preservation of the Union--AD 1861-1865.”

Chaplain Erastus M. Cravath, 101st Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, was interred in Section MM, Grave 16694, in 1900. Chaplain Cravath was one of the founders of Fisk University in Nashville, and served for 25 years as its president.

Colonel James W. Lawless, 5th Kentucky Cavalry, was buried in Section MM, Grave 10662, on June 25, 1899. Col. Lawless was born in Ireland and came to the United States at the age of 16.

Colonel Edward S. Jones, Commander of the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry, was also the founder of the Department of Tennessee and Georgia Grand Army of the Republic and served as Commander for many years. He was interred in Section MM, Grave 16520, in Nov. 1866.

Mount Olivet Cemetery - "Confederate Circle"
After the War Between the States, the women of Nashville bought land at Mount Olivet, and formed Confederate Circle. The remains of about 1,500 Confederate soldiers were moved here from area battlefields. Seven Confederate generals are buried in or around the circle.

They are William B. Bate, William N.R, Bealle, Benjamin Franklin Cheatham, William H. Jackson, George E. Maney, James E. Rains, and Thomas Benton Smith. Other prominent Nashville Confederates, Colonels Adolphus Heiman and Randall McGavock, lie nearby. A 45-foot granite monument marks the center of the circle.

"Heroine of the South": Mary Kate Patterson Davis Hill Kyle (1844-1931) worked with Coleman's scouts and Sam Davis during the Civil War to spy in the Lavergne-Nolensville-Nashville area. When a teenager, she smuggled vital information and supplies through Union lines. Mrs. Kyle was buried in the Confederate Circle at Mt. Olivet Cemetery, the first woman so honored.

The State Capital was the first to fall durring the Civil War .and there are monuments to Sam Davis "the boy hero of the confedearcy, one to General Forrest and a Monument to the Brave Women of the Confederacy.
lso there is a small Confederate Cemetery near the Hermitage " The Home of Andrew Jackson" between Nashville and Lebanon

The Hermitage Grounds at one time held the Tennessee Confederate Solders Home.. And most if not all of the Solders buried in the Small Confederate Cemetery previous mentioned came from here.

Kindest regards,

Steven
 

william42

First Sergeant
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
1,600
Location
Evansville, Indiana
Steve, thank you very much. You are ever the Southern Gentleman. I like Wiley Sword, as I've read his book on Shiloh. I will look for his book on those engagements, also the books by Mr. Logsdon. Thank you again for your trouble, and for posting the remainder of the info on the Franklin area. Take care.

Terry
 

scone

Sergeant Major
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Messages
2,060
Location
Tennessee - From the "The City Between The Lakes"
Terry,

Most welcome I have a passion for the 1864 Tennessee Campaign. So the info is no trouble at all. Living less than 50 miles from Franklin I get to visit quite often A Wonderfull little tour that can be covered in a day is to Start in mount pleasant and follow the armys path to Nashville..

It was natural to find any thing war related along the route and in the area.

regards, Steven.
 
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