Tariffs Forced Southern States to Secede

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Patrick Sulley

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Thanks for your response.
I'm not suggesting anything! I am simply interested in the responses our trading partners had to our tariff policy.
Here is a good read that briefly touches on tariffs on exports. by the time of the book excerpts, England had repealed most tariffs on cotton and other exports because of low tariffs placed on imports from 1830's...not clear that they would put them back on for future tariffs like the morill tariff but its safe to assume they would

United States Congressional Serial Set, Volume 6085

TARIFF OF JULY 30, 1846. PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE. First Annual Message. Washington, December 2, 1845. page 320.
 
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trice

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Secretary of the Treasury Robert Walker issued a report in 1845 on the nature and effects of the tariff, observing, “At least two-thirds of the taxes imposed by the present tariff are paid, not into the treasury but to the protected classes. ... [The tariff] is too unequal, and unjust, too exorbitant and oppressive, and too clearly in conflict with the fundamental principles of the Constitution.” Walker concluded, “If England would now repeal her duties upon our wheat, flour, Indian corn, and other agricultural products, our own restrictive system would certainly be doomed to overthrow.” Walker assumed this because American protectionists had eternally pointed to English trade barriers to justify the perpetuation of high American tariffs. In 1846 the British repealed almost all tariffs on agricultural products. Yet American protectionists were not satisfied, and quickly invented new reasons that the United States should have high tariffs. For the next 40 years, anyone who advocated free trade was loudly accused of having taken “British gold.”
I have never been a fan of Robert J. Walker. I think President Polk should have taken to heart Andrew Jackson's warning "that Walker wasn't a man to be trusted with the nation's cash."

During the Mexican War, some six million dollars seems to have gone missing from the US Treasury (much of it simply temporarily lost due to lousy record keeping, I think). This came to the President's attention when Buchanan suggested they delay troop call-ups because the Treasury seemed to be running out of cash. An angry Polk went looking for answers. Walker didn't have any. An investigation started.

It turned out that $2 million of the missing money had gone to the bank of Corcoran & Riggs in New Orleans, that $900,000 had actually been spent on war-related work, and the balance of 1.1 million had been invested in stocks while it was sitting around. That $1.1 million was really only $600,000 now, said Walker, which was all that would be distributed to the Army by September 15. No one seems to actually know what happened to the other $500,000, so I would guess it was lost in speculation. The investigation was shut down.

Whether Walker was honest or not I do not know. Clearly Andrew Jackson knew what he was talking about when he said "that Walker wasn't a man to be trusted with the nation's cash."
 
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Patrick Sulley

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I have never been a fan of Robert J. Walker. I think President Polk should have taken to heart Andrew Jackson's warning "that Walker wasn't a man to be trusted with the nation's cash."

During the Mexican War, some six million dollars seems to have gone missing from the US Treasury (much of it simply temporarily lost due to lousy record keeping, I think). This came to the President's attention when Buchanan suggested they delay troop call-ups because the Treasury seemed to be running out of cash. An angry Polk went looking for answers. Walker didn't have any. An investigation started.

It turned out that $2 million of the missing money had gone to the bank of Corcoran & Riggs in New Orleans, that $900,000 had actually been spent on war-related work, and the balance of 1.1 million had been invested in stocks while it was sitting around. That $1.1 million was really only $600,000 now, said Walker, which was all that would be distributed to the Army by September 15. No one seems to actually know what happened to the other $500,000, so I would guess it was lost in speculation. The investigation was shut down.

Whether Walker was honest or not I do not know. Clearly Andrew Jackson knew what he was talking about when he said "that Walker wasn't a man to be trusted with the nation's cash."
he very well may have been corrupt...dont know if that made what he said about tariffs any less true tho. Eventually Walker told Polk that the $600,000 remaining in the bankers' hands would be distributed to the army and Polk lost interest in the matter. No chicanery was proven before the investigation was dropped.
 
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trice

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he very well may have been corrupt...dont know if that made what he said about tariffs any less true tho. Eventually Walker told Polk that the $600,000 remaining in the bankers' hands would be distributed to the army and Polk lost interest in the matter. No chicanery was proven before the investigation was dropped.
Perhaps. I don't think Polk lost interest in it, though. He had been an anti-bank man on campaign, so a scandal where half a million dollars just went poof! in the middle of an unpopular/controversial war would have been very embarrassing. I would guess this is something that just got swept under the rug in a form of don't ask/don't tell.
 
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