Restricted Taking down Confederate monuments not an easy task

18thVirginia

Major
Joined
Sep 8, 2012
I think that as long as communities define themselves with racial terms, these problems will continue. I think that it is about time that communities are defined by their community's name instead of by its racial composition. There is a New Orleans community, which is a very diverse and multi-racial community. In order to end racism, we have to be color blind. Any and every mention of race or differentiation of history/beliefs/abilities/privileges/etc based on race, feed racism. The community of New Orleans should be responsible for these monuments, regardless the color of people's skin or the language they speak at home. About time that American history becomes that. American History. Not White American or Black American or Gay American or whatever. Otherwise, monuments (and history) that do not represent someone's heritage, will be in danger.

Have you ever been in New Orleans? Because I've lived a few places, as well as in New Orleans, and it seems a little presumptuous to speak to New Orleanians about developing a cross cultural history or "color blindness."
 

18thVirginia

Major
Joined
Sep 8, 2012
Wooow back up the truck---IT IS NOT THE STATES OR LOCAL GOV'T FUNDS--it's the taxpayers money. Seems like everyone forgets that. And more than likely federal money will be involved which means it's my money also! And we wonder why taxes are so high. Let those who wish to move them pay for the moveing or demolition!

I asked the question because it had been stated that perhaps private money should be used to do something different with monuments. Since public money has been used to maintain the Lee monument and public state and local money was used to build the Jefferson Davis monument, I wondered if there were some different standard.

Did people feel that public money should be used only for Confederate monuments or Confederate heritager approved locations for Confederate monuments?
 

E_just_E

Captain
Forum Host
Retired Moderator
Joined
Sep 3, 2014
Location
Center Valley, PA
Have you ever been in New Orleans? Because I've lived a few places, as well as in New Orleans, and it seems a little presumptuous to speak to New Orleanians about developing a cross cultural history or "color blindness."

Yes I have. Before Katrina. Yes it is a city divided, but unless someone makes an effort to be colorblind, all these problems will continue. Color-blindness is a prerequisite to ending racism and bigotry.
 

Allie

Captain
Joined
Dec 17, 2014
I asked the question because it had been stated that perhaps private money should be used to do something different with monuments. Since public money has been used to maintain the Lee monument and public state and local money was used to build the Jefferson Davis monument, I wondered if there were some different standard.

Did people feel that public money should be used only for Confederate monuments or Confederate heritager approved locations for Confederate monuments?
I believe most of the Confederate monuments were raised using private money. At least that's true of the ones in my vicinity.
 

Poor Private

First Sergeant
Joined
Sep 6, 2009
As to funds/labor/ equipment/property for removal or relocation of any monuments I havn't heard of any group or individual coming forward except for 2 people on this forum, one who is offer equipment and myself offering a location. I was quite serious about the 10 acres of woods, it's a nice peaceful location with a pond in the middle.
I am tired of those who scream the sky is falling, not offering a logical alternative. Or stepping forward, I don't see any group or individual:spin:.
 

18thVirginia

Major
Joined
Sep 8, 2012
Yes I have. Before Katrina. Yes it is a city divided, but unless someone makes an effort to be colorblind, all these problems will continue. Color-blindness is a prerequisite to ending racism and bigotry.

A city divided? The white mayor is saying that it's time to take down a statue that was installed to promote the past and foster racial division within the City. This white mayor was originally elected by the black majority, because the white upper class voted for his black opponent. We just visited the new museum on slavery, where a white lawyer spent $8 million to "tell it like it is" about slavery.

New Orleans has its own oddities, but I don't think its people can be lectured about racism by those who live elsewhere. The city was perhaps the only place in the South that genuinely had a chance during Reconstruction, because it had such a different history, with a middle class population of Creole people of color. The Confederate monuments to Davis and Lee in part represent the deliberate destruction of the identity of that group of people in a post-War political environment.
 
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ole

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Retired Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2005
Location
Near Kankakee
History is not what ought to have been; it is what was. Period.We can find all kinds of things in there that we don't like, but that doesn't change what was. And all kinds of names for what was are in play. It doesn't matter. It was what it was.
 

John Hartwell

Major
Forum Host
Joined
Aug 27, 2011
Location
Central Massachusetts
New Orleans was a Union City for the majority of the Civil War. Of course, the Union victory and capture of New Orleans was the reason that the city was so central in black enlistment and emancipation...
I suppose they could replace Andy Jackson with a grand equestrian statue of Ben Butler.
stirpot.gif
 
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