State Rights Amongest The Southern States

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Did States Rights ever get in the way between the different confederate states from working peacefully with one another? I read somewhere that the Deep South thought differently of Virginia and much of the Upper South, because Virginia among others were slow to leave the Union etc.
 

rpkennedy

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Did States Rights ever get in the way between the different confederate states from working peacefully with one another? I read somewhere that the Deep South thought differently of Virginia and much of the Upper South, because Virginia among others were slow to leave the Union etc.
Look up Governor Joe Brown of Georgia.

R
 

John Winn

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In short, yes. There is a school of thought that you'll often see summarized as "state's rights killed the Confederacy" that postulates that inter-state struggles were a primary factor in the CSA losing the war. And while that school has largely been rejected, that inter-state disagreements were a factor is certain. As has been noted on this forum recently, the political system of the CSA was flawed in a number of ways (e.g. see the Davis as tyrant thread).

As the war progressed tensions between the border states and the deep south states increased as the border states were dealing with actual occupation by federal troops which changed their opinions on a number of things and also made voting difficult in those areas.

It's an interesting area of study and a very good question. Stay tuned as I'm sure you'll get a lot of answers (not all of them in agreement with my sentiments I'd guess).

Good to have you in the discussion.
 
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jgoodguy

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In short, yes. There is a school of thought that you'll often see summarized as "state's rights killed the Confederacy" that postulates that inter-state struggles were a primary factor in the CSA losing the war. And while that school has largely been rejected, that inter-state disagreements were a factor is certain. As has been noted on this forum recently, the political system of the CSA was flawed in a number of ways (e.g. see the Davis as tyrant thread).

As the war progressed tensions between the border states and the deep south states increased as the border states were dealing with actual occupation by federal troops which changed their opinions on a number of things and also made voting difficult in those areas.

It's an interesting area of study and a very good question. Stay tuned as I'm sure you'll get a lot of answers (not all of them in agreement with my sentiments I'd guess).

Good to have you in the discussion.

When the CSA was formed the political theory was that all the central government was to do was to act as the agent of the states. The war changed all that.
 

John Winn

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When the CSA was formed the political theory was that all the central government was to do was to act as the agent of the states. The war changed all that.
Good point. That was central to their belief that they were simply invoking the founders when they seceded as that view of the role of the federal government was pretty much dominant in the early years of our country. As you note, that view changed in short order once there was a war to fight.
 
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When the CSA was formed the political theory was that all the central government was to do was to act as the agent of the states. The war changed all that.
Interesting..so the states made their own choices based on what was best for their own?
 
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John Winn

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Interesting..so the states made their own choices based on what was best for their own?
Again, in short, yes. As examples, governors often stockpiled supplies that were needed elsewhere and didn't cooperate in the draft and were often focused on what was happening in their state. Theory is nice when things are going well but when stuff hits the fan, well ....
 
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brass napoleon

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Did States Rights ever get in the way between the different confederate states from working peacefully with one another? I read somewhere that the Deep South thought differently of Virginia and much of the Upper South, because Virginia among others were slow to leave the Union etc.
States' rights was really a justification for secession, not much more than that. The Southern states didn't practice states' rights when they were in control of the United States government, nor did they practice states' rights when they were in control of the Confederate government.
 
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Again, in short, yes. As examples, governors often stockpiled supplies that were needed elsewhere and didn't cooperate in the draft and were often focused on what was happening in their state. Theory is nice when things are going well but when stuff hits the fan, well ....
Fascinating..I just read that Governor Joe Brown of Georgia didn't want to send soldiers to Virginia to participate at First Manassas. I live in Virginia and at both battles locals opened their homes to the wounded from GA..I wonder if Governor Joe Brown knew that haha...
 

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Again, in short, yes. As examples, governors often stockpiled supplies that were needed elsewhere and didn't cooperate in the draft and were often focused on what was happening in their state. Theory is nice when things are going well but when stuff hits the fan, well ....
It also affected war policy. No State would allow any part of it to be at risk, the CSA army had to be everywhere which meant that it could be attacked in strength anywhere because it was so spread out.
 
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jgoodguy

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States' rights was really a justification for secession, not much more than that. The Southern states didn't practice states' rights when they were in control of the United States government, nor did they practice states' rights when they were in control of the Confederate government.

States rights in service to the slave owners who did not want a federal government taking their slaves away.
 

OpnCoronet

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On a different, but related, level, slavery, the cause of secession. Leonaidas Spratt, the philosopher of a slave based society, rejected the very idea of any border state being allowed into the confederacy, because they were all hopelessly infected with abolitionism and would almost certainly become a source of contention and strife(perhaps even further secessions).
 
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