State of North Carolina Monument (Gettysburg)

State of North Carolina Monument

:CSA1stNat:
1574107495338.png

©Michael Kendra, about 2003.


MONUMENT PROFILE
  • Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania
  • Location: Seminary Ridge east of West Confederate Avenue
  • Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 5.88", -77° 14' 49.92"
  • Men Engaged at Gettysburg from North Carolina: 14,150
  • Gettysburg Casualties from North Carolina: 6,160 or 43%

MONUMENT DETAILS
  • Artist: Borglum, Gutzon, sculptor
    • Kunst Foundry, founder
  • Dedicated: July 3, 1929
  • Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 15 ft. 9 in.
    • Base: 9 ft. 9 in. x 6 ft. 6 in.
  • Cost: $50,000.00 (July 1929) for the Monument and property.
  • Description:
A bronze group of five figures representing North Carolina infantrymen charging forward in the midst of battle. Three of the figures carry guns, one carries a flag, and one kneels on the ground and points toward the enemy with his proper left hand. The monument is enclosed with a metal fence. The monument has two narrative marker monoliths, one standing, one laying horizontal on the ground.​
  • Remarks:
Four small stone markers denote the property purchased by the State of North Carolina in 1927. (Estimated to be .84 Acres or 200' across by 184' deep, or 36,400 ft.2 )​

MONUMENT TEXT
Text on Upright Inscribed Granite Slab
1863
NORTH CAROLINA
TO THE ETERNAL GLORY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA
SOLDIERS. WHO ON THIS BATTLEFIELD DISPLAYED
HEROISM UNSURPASSED SACRIFICING ALL IN SUP-
PORT OF THEIR CAUSE.THEIR VALOROUS DEEDS
WILL BE ENSHRINED IN THE HEARTS OF MEN LONG
AFTER THESE TRANSIENT MEMORIALS HAVE CRUM-
BLED INTO DUST.
THIRTY TWO NORTH CAROLINA REGIMENTS WERE IN
ACTION AT GETTYSBURG JULY 1,2,3, 1863. ONE CON-
FEDERATE SOLDIER IN EVERY FOUR WHO FELL HERE
WAS A NORTH CAROLINIAN.
__________________________________________​
THIS TABLET ERECTED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA DIVISION UNITED DAUGHTERS
OF THE CONFEDERACY.

Text Inscribed in Horizontal Granite Slab
NORTH CAROLINA ORGANIZATIONS IN THE ARMY OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG
JULY 1-3, 1863
6TH, 21ST, 57TH INFANTRY - HOKE'S BRIGADE OF EARLY'S DIVISION
1ST, 3RD INFANTRY - STEUART'S BRIGADE OF JOHNSON'S DIVISION
32ND, 43RD, 45TH, 53RD INFANTRY AND 2ND BATTALION - DANIEL'S BRIGADE OF
RODES' DIVISION
5TH, 12TH, 20TH, 23RD INFANTRY - IVERSON'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION
2ND, 4TH, 14TH, 30TH INFANTRY - RAMSEUR'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION
11TH, 26TH, 47TH, 52ND INFANTRY - PETTIGREW'S BRIGADE OF HETH'S DIVISION
55TH INFANTRY - DAVIS' BRIGADE OF HETH'S DIVISION
7TH, 18TH, 28TH, 33RD, 37TH INFANTRY - LANE'S BRIGADE OF PENDER'S DIVISION
13TH, 16TH, 22ND, 34TH, 38TH INFANTRY - SCALES DIVISION
1ST NORTH CAROLINA ARTILLERY, BATTERY A - MCLAWS DIVISION
BRANCH (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY \
ROWAN (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY- / HOOD'S DIVISION​
CHARLOTTE (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY - PENDER'S DIVISION
1ST CAVALRY - HAMPTON'S BRIGADE ----------\
2ND, 4TH CAVALRY - ROBERTSON'S BRIGADE - } STUART'S DIVISION OF CAVALRY
5TH CAVALRY - W.H.F. LEE'S BRIGADE ---------/



1582834654100.png
MONUMENT HISTORY


A 1913 North Carolina commission of Civil War veterans presented a monument proposal after visiting the Gettysburg Battlefield, and after World War I, the North Carolina United Daughters of the Confederacy and Governor Angus McLean continued the planning in 1927, with a commission visiting the battlefield on September 28th, 1926.

North Carolina appropriated $50,000.00 to purchase and landscape the site and to commission Gutzon Borglum, who was approached while working on Mount Rushmore.

Borglum designed the monument in Texas and posed the Confederate flag designer (Orren Smith) as the flag bearer, while the other soldiers were sculpted from photographs of posed Confederate soldiers. Postponed from May 1929, the US Navy and 6th Field Artillery bands played at the monument's dedication on July 3, 1929.

By 1949, a glass-faced display at the site, and a wooden marker for the site was cut down by vandals in 1954. President Kennedy left his car to visit the monument in April 1963 prior to the rededication on the 100th anniversary.

After a 1985 restoration required lifting by helicopter for shipment to Cincinnati, a fence was added in 1993; and after the 1995 Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey reported the sculpture needed treatment, the monument was rehabilitated in 1999.

MONUMENT DEDICATION

1582833714053.png
1582833727804.png

- Click on image to zoom in -


ADDITIONAL PHOTOS

1574107659992.png
Monument Dedication Day, July 3, 1929. From left to right State Auditor Baxter Durham, Gov. Angus McLean, Gov. O. Max Gardner and State Adjutant General J. Vann B. Metts. Image from the N.C. Museum of History.

1574107681851.png
Battlefield Guide Colonel Jacob Sheads leads a tour at the North Carolina State Monument for President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, March 31, 1963.

RELATED LINKS
citation information The following information is provided for citations.
Article Title:
State of North Carolina Monument (Gettysburg)
Article Subject:
Civil War Monuments, Structures, & Other Points of Interest
Author:
Mike Kendra, @CivilWarTalk
Website Name:
CivilWarTalk.com
URL:
https://civilwartalk.com/threads/state-of-north-carolina-monument-gettysburg.165445/
Publisher:
CivilWarTalk, LLC
Original Published Date:
February 27, 2020

links to state and national monuments, and nearby landmarks Located at Gettysburg National Military Park, in Adams County, Pennsylvania (rev.6/1/21)
National Monuments
Eternal Light Peace Memorial Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial High Water Mark
Lincoln Speech Memorial Soldiers' National Monument
U.S. State Monuments
DE IN MD NY NY Auxiliary PA VT U.S. Regulars
C.S. State Monuments
AL AR DE FL GA LA MD MS NC SC TN TX VA
Union Regimentals
CT DE IL IN ME MD MA MI MN
NH NJ NY OH PA RI VT WV WI U.S. Regulars
Individual &
Commemorative
Monuments
Equestrian Monuments: Hancock Howard Lee Longstreet Meade Reynolds Sedgwick Slocum
Standing Bronze Statues:
Barlow Buford Burns Father Corby Crawford Doubleday Geary Gibbon
Greene Hays Humphreys Robinson Wadsworth Warren Webb
Wells
Other Individual Monuments:
Armistead Chapman Collis Cushing Fuller Rev. Howell Humiston Merwin
Nicholson Sickles Taylor Vincent Ward Weed & Hazlett Willard Woolson Zook
Landmarks
Black Horse Tavern Cashtown Inn Dobbin House Evergreen Cemetery Jennie Wade House Lutheran Theological Seminary
McAllister's Mill Railroad Station Sachs Covered Bridge
Thompson House David Wills House
Farms: Codori Bliss Brian
Daniel Schaefer Hummelbaugh Klingle Lady Leister McLean McPherson
Rogers Rose Rummel Sherfy Slyder Snyder Taney Trostle George Weikert Wentz
Points of Interest
New Museum & Visitor Center Benner's Hill Cemetery Hill Copse of Trees Culp's Hill
Devil's Den Peach Orchard Little Round Top
Big Round Top Sachs Covered Bridge
Spangler's Spring East Cavalry Field Soldiers' National Cemetery National Cemetery Annex

Gone But Not Forgotten: Old Museum, Visitor Center, & Electric Map Old Cyclorama National Tower
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
MONUMENT PROFILE
  • Battlefield: Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania
  • Location: Seminary Ridge east of West Confederate Avenue
  • Map Coordinates: +39° 49' 5.88", -77° 14' 49.92"
  • Men Engaged at Gettysburg from North Carolina: 14,150
  • Gettysburg Casualties from North Carolina: 6,160 or 43%

MONUMENT DETAILS
  • Artist: Borglum, Gutzon, sculptor; Kunst Foundry, founder
  • Dedicated: July 3, 1929
  • Dimensions: Sculpture: H. 15 ft. 9 in.; Base: 9 ft. 9 in. x 6 ft. 6 in.
  • Description: A bronze group of five figures representing North Carolina infantrymen charging forward in the midst of battle. Three of the figures carry guns, one carries a flag, and one kneels on the ground and points toward the enemy with his proper left hand. The monument is enclosed with a metal fence. The monument has two narrative marker monoliths, one standing, one laying horizontal on the ground.
  • Cost: $50,000.00 (July 1929) for the Monument and property.
  • Remarks: Four small stone markers denote the property purchased by the State of North Carolina in 1927. (Estimated to be .84 Acres or 200' across by 184' deep, or 36,400 ft.2 )

MONUMENT TEXT
Text on Upright Inscribed Granite Slab
1863
NORTH CAROLINA
TO THE ETERNAL GLORY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA
SOLDIERS. WHO ON THIS BATTLEFIELD DISPLAYED
HEROISM UNSURPASSED SACRIFICING ALL IN SUP-
PORT OF THEIR CAUSE.THEIR VALOROUS DEEDS
WILL BE ENSHRINED IN THE HEARTS OF MEN LONG
AFTER THESE TRANSIENT MEMORIALS HAVE CRUM-
BLED INTO DUST.
THIRTY TWO NORTH CAROLINA REGIMENTS WERE IN
ACTION AT GETTYSBURG JULY 1,2,3, 1863. ONE CON-
FEDERATE SOLDIER IN EVERY FOUR WHO FELL HERE
WAS A NORTH CAROLINIAN.
__________________________________________​
THIS TABLET ERECTED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA DIVISION UNITED DAUGHTERS
OF THE CONFEDERACY.

Text Inscribed in Horizontal Granite Slab
NORTH CAROLINA ORGANIZATIONS IN THE ARMY OF
NORTHERN VIRGINIA AT THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG
JULY 1-3, 1863
6TH, 21ST, 57TH INFANTRY - HOKE'S BRIGADE OF EARLY'S DIVISION
1ST, 3RD INFANTRY - STEUART'S BRIGADE OF JOHNSON'S DIVISION
32ND, 43RD, 45TH, 53RD INFANTRY AND 2ND BATTALION - DANIEL'S BRIGADE OF
RODES' DIVISION
5TH, 12TH, 20TH, 23RD INFANTRY - IVERSON'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION
2ND, 4TH, 14TH, 30TH INFANTRY - RAMSEUR'S BRIGADE OF RODES' DIVISION
11TH, 26TH, 47TH, 52ND INFANTRY - PETTIGREW'S BRIGADE OF HETH'S DIVISION
55TH INFANTRY - DAVIS' BRIGADE OF HETH'S DIVISION
7TH, 18TH, 28TH, 33RD, 37TH INFANTRY - LANE'S BRIGADE OF PENDER'S DIVISION
13TH, 16TH, 22ND, 34TH, 38TH INFANTRY - SCALES DIVISION
1ST NORTH CAROLINA ARTILLERY, BATTERY A - MCLAWS DIVISION
BRANCH (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY \
ROWAN (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY- / HOOD'S DIVISION​
CHARLOTTE (NORTH CAROLINA) ARTILLERY - PENDER'S DIVISION
1ST CAVALRY - HAMPTON'S BRIGADE ----------\
2ND, 4TH CAVALRY - ROBERTSON'S BRIGADE - } STUART'S DIVISION OF CAVALRY
5TH CAVALRY - W.H.F. LEE'S BRIGADE ---------/


LOCATION MAP




View attachment 348899MONUMENT HISTORY

A 1913 North Carolina commission of Civil War veterans presented a monument proposal after visiting the Gettysburg Battlefield, and after World War I, the North Carolina United Daughters of the Confederacy and Governor Angus McLean continued the planning in 1927, with a commission visiting the battlefield on September 28th, 1926.

North Carolina appropriated $50,000.00 to purchase and landscape the site and to commission Gutzon Borglum, who was approached while working on Mount Rushmore.

Borglum designed the monument in Texas and posed the Confederate flag designer (Orren Smith) as the flag bearer, while the other soldiers were sculpted from photographs of posed Confederate soldiers. Postponed from May 1929, the US Navy and 6th Field Artillery bands played at the monument's dedication on July 3, 1929.

By 1949, a glass-faced display at the site, and a wooden marker for the site was cut down by vandals in 1954. President Kennedy left his car to visit the monument in April 1963 prior to the rededication on the 100th anniversary.

After a 1985 restoration required lifting by helicopter for shipment to Cincinnati, a fence was added in 1993; and after the 1995 Smithsonian's Save Outdoor Sculpture! survey reported the sculpture needed treatment, the monument was rehabilitated in 1999.

MONUMENT DEDICATION

View attachment 348896View attachment 348897
- Click on image to zoom in -


ADDITIONAL PHOTOS

Monument Dedication Day, July 3, 1929. From left to right State Auditor Baxter Durham, Gov. Angus McLean, Gov. O. Max Gardner and State Adjutant General J. Vann B. Metts. Image from the N.C. Museum of History.

Battlefield Guide Colonel Jacob Sheads leads a tour at the North Carolina State Monument for President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, March 31, 1963.

RELATED LINKS

Gettysburg after battle report:

Report of Capt. J. J. Young, quartermaster Twenty-sixth North
Carolina Infantry.

Near Gettysburg, Pa.,
July 4, 1863.
My dear Governor: I will trespass a few minutes upon your
indulgence to communicate the sad fate that has befallen the old
Twenty-sixth.

The heaviest conflict of the war has taken place in this vicinity.
It commenced July 1, and raged furiously until late last night.
Heth's division, of A. P. Hill's corps, opened the ball, and Pettigrew's
brigade was the advance. We went in with over 800 men in
the regiment. There came out but 216, all told, unhurt.

Yesterday they were again engaged, and now have only about 80
men for duty.

To give you an idea of the frightful loss in officers: Heth being
wounded, Pettigrew commands the division and Maj. [J.] Jones
our brigade. Eleven men were shot down the first day with our
colors; yesterday they were lost. Poor Col. Burgwyn, jr., was
shot through both lungs, and died shortly afterward. His loss is
great, for he had but few equals of his age. Capt. McCreery, of
Gen. Pettigrew's staff, was shot through the heart and instantly
killed; with them Lieut.-Col. Lane through the neck, jaw,
and mouth, I fear mortally; Adjutant [James B.] Jordan in the
hip, severely; Capt. [J. T.] Adams, shoulder, seriously; Stokes
McRae's thigh broken; Capt. [William] Wilson was killed; Lieut.'s
[John W.] Richardson and [J. B.] Holloway have died of
their wounds. It is thought Lieut. [M.] McLeod and Capt.
[N. G.] Bradford will die.

Nearly all the rest of the officers were slightly wounded. [I. A.]
Jarratt I had forgotten to mention--in the face and hand. Yesterday,
Capt. [S. P.] Wagg was shot through by grape and instantly
killed; Lieut. [G.] Broughton in the head, and instantly killed;
[Alexander] Saunders was wounded and [J. R.] Emerson left on the
field for dead.

Capt. [H. C.] Albright is the only captain left in the regiment
unhurt, and commands the regiment. Lieut.'s [J. A.] Lowe,
[M. B.] Blair, [T. J.] Cureton, and [C. M.] Sudderth are all of the
subalterns. Col. Faribault, of the Forty-seventh, is severely
wounded. Lieut.-Col. [J. A.] Graves and Maj. [A. D.]
Crudup supposed killed. Col. Marshall and Maj. [J. Q.] Richardson,
of the Fifty-second, supposed to be killed. Lieut.-Col.
Parks dangerously wounded; Col. Leventhorpe badly wounded;
Maj. Ross killed.

Our whole division numbers but only 1,500 or 1,600 effective men,
as officially reported, but, of course, a good many will still come in.
The division at the beginning numbered about 8,000 effective men.

I hear our army is generally badly cut up. We will fall back about
5 miles, to draw the enemy, if possible, from his impregnable position.

It was a second Fredericksburg affair, only the wrong way. We
had to charge over a mile a stone wall in an elevated position.

I learn the loss of the enemy is terrible. We have taken 10,000 or
15,000 prisoners in all. Yesterday, in falling back, we had to leave
the wounded; hence the uncertainty of a good many being killed
late yesterday evening. I must close.

Yours, truly,

J. J. YOUNG,
Capt., and Assistant Quartermaster.

His Excellency Gov. Zebulon B. Vance.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 27. Part II. Reports. Serial No. 44
..................................................................................................................................

Fifty-third North Carolina Infantry



Gettysburg after battle report:

Report of Col. William A. Owens, Fifty-third North Carolina Infantry.

July 19, 1863.
Sir: In the engagement at Gettysburg, Pa., my regiment took
part in the field as follows:

On July 1, I moved from Little Creek to within 2 miles of Gettysburg,
and was in line of battle at or about 1 o'clock, when we advanced
through an open field, coming in sight of the enemy on the
crest. The line moved forward some 200 yards, when I moved by
the left flank some 300 yards, under fire. I again moved to the front
some 50 or 100 yards, when I was ordered to take my regiment to
the support of Gen. Iverson. I again moved by the flank, and
brought them into line on the left of the Third Alabama, which was
on Gen. Iverson's right. I next moved to the right of the Third
Alabama, and moved forward through a wheat-field to within 50
yards of some woods in front. The Third Alabama fell back, leaving
my left exposed, and I ordered my regiment back some 50 yards,
it at this time being exposed to a fire on both flanks. I changed my
front to the right, to face the enemy on the right. I afterward
moved my regiment back to the position on the right of the Third
Alabama, which was then going off to the left. I fronted, and moved
forward to the woods, where I joined the right of the Twelfth North
Carolina Infantry, and moved on through the woods to the railroad
embankment, where I halted, and moved by the left to the edge of
the town, where I halted and remained during the night.

July 2, I was ordered to take position on the right of Col.
O'Neal, commanding Rodes' brigade, behind the railroad embankment,
my right resting at a very deep cut. Finding Col.
O'Neal's brigade would cover all the ground, I reported, and was
ordered to take position on the right of the brigade, which was in a
corn-field, and behind a section of Col. [T. H.] Carter's battery.
It was left at discretion with me to move my men, if they suffered
from the enemy's fire, but to remain within supporting distance. I
moved my regiment about 50 yards to the right, in rear of the left
of Gen. [J. H.] Lane's brigade, where I remained until dark, when
I was ordered to take my position on the right of the brigade. We
then moved forward about half a mile toward the enemy's position,
and remained about half an hour, when I moved by the left flank
to the road leading through town, and bivouacked in line for the
night.

July 3, at 3 a. m., I moved with the brigade through Gettysburg,
and around to the right of the enemy, which was about 4 miles, and
lay in line at the foot of a hill, the Thirty-second North Carolina
being on my right. After some skirmishing, I was ordered to move
by the left flank, to the support of some brigade on the left. I moved,
and was fronted behind a brigade, and then ordered forward. After
firing some little time, I was ordered to let my men fall back under
cover of the hill, keeping out my sharpshooters. Again I was
ordered forward, and kept position just under the edge of the crest
until, about 2 or 3 o'clock, I saw the regiments on my right and left
going back. I then ordered my men to fall back some 50 yards,
when I was ordered to move by the right flank, and was halted
about 150 yards from the position left, where I remained until 3 a.m.,
and then moved by a circuitous route back to the hills which we had
taken the first day, where we remained until Sunday (July 4), 3 a. m.,
when we left.

As to the casualties in my regiment, they were forwarded.* My
officers and men acted very well. I would especially mention Sergeant
[E. J.] Null, Company H, and Private [W. D.] McAdoo, Company
A, both, I am sorry to say, severely wounded.

There were many others who acted very gallantly, but these two
surpassed all.

Very respectfully,

W. A. OWENS,
Col., Comdg.

Capt. W. M. Hammond,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 27. Part II. Reports. Serial No. 44

*******************************************************************************



 
Joined
Aug 25, 2013
Location
Hannover, Germany
My favorite monument on any field.
And I'm an Ohio Yankee.

Mine too.
When I first saw it in 2013, on my first visit to Gettysburg, our tour guide explained that the faces of the men mirror different emotions in the face of the battle. I found that very fascinating and will leave it to every individual onlooker to identify these emotions for themselves.
It have often read that the North Carolina monument at Gettysburg and the US Marine Corps War Memorial (aka Iwo Jima monument) at Arlington National Cemetery are similar in composition and effect and I find that very true.
My photo from 2013:
1582894654646.png


From Wikipedia:
Screenshot_20200228-060246_Chrome.jpg

Source
 
Last edited:

Jeff in Ohio

Sergeant
Joined
Oct 17, 2015
A wonderful sculpture, and a nice tribute to the "vale of humility between two mountains of conceit."

Some years ago, I bought a nice brown Harpers Ferry model 1842 musket with a penknife carved inscription with 3 initials, a company designation, and "37th NC" all clearly carved on the butt of the musket, and then a very large and deep "X" carved over the entire inscription. I've always wondered if this Model 1842 was carried at Gattysburg
 

CSA Today

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Honored Fallen Comrade
Joined
Dec 3, 2011
Location
Laurinburg NC
A wonderful sculpture, and a nice tribute to the "vale of humility between two mountains of conceit."

Some years ago, I bought a nice brown Harpers Ferry model 1842 musket with a penknife carved inscription with 3 initials, a company designation, and "37th NC" all clearly carved on the butt of the musket, and then a very large and deep "X" carved over the entire inscription. I've always wondered if this Model 1842 was carried at Gattysburg
I have the rosters for all North Carolina troops, if you give the initials and company designation I might be able to tell you who carried the musket.
 

Gettysburg Guide #154

Sergeant
Member of the Month
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Gettysburg after battle report:

Report of Capt. J. J. Young, quartermaster Twenty-sixth North
Carolina Infantry.

Near Gettysburg, Pa.,
July 4, 1863.
My dear Governor: I will trespass a few minutes upon your
indulgence to communicate the sad fate that has befallen the old
Twenty-sixth.

The heaviest conflict of the war has taken place in this vicinity.
It commenced July 1, and raged furiously until late last night.
Heth's division, of A. P. Hill's corps, opened the ball, and Pettigrew's
brigade was the advance. We went in with over 800 men in
the regiment. There came out but 216, all told, unhurt.

Yesterday they were again engaged, and now have only about 80
men for duty.

To give you an idea of the frightful loss in officers: Heth being
wounded, Pettigrew commands the division and Maj. [J.] Jones
our brigade. Eleven men were shot down the first day with our
colors; yesterday they were lost. Poor Col. Burgwyn, jr., was
shot through both lungs, and died shortly afterward. His loss is
great, for he had but few equals of his age. Capt. McCreery, of
Gen. Pettigrew's staff, was shot through the heart and instantly
killed; with them Lieut.-Col. Lane through the neck, jaw,
and mouth, I fear mortally; Adjutant [James B.] Jordan in the
hip, severely; Capt. [J. T.] Adams, shoulder, seriously; Stokes
McRae's thigh broken; Capt. [William] Wilson was killed; Lieut.'s
[John W.] Richardson and [J. B.] Holloway have died of
their wounds. It is thought Lieut. [M.] McLeod and Capt.
[N. G.] Bradford will die.

Nearly all the rest of the officers were slightly wounded. [I. A.]
Jarratt I had forgotten to mention--in the face and hand. Yesterday,
Capt. [S. P.] Wagg was shot through by grape and instantly
killed; Lieut. [G.] Broughton in the head, and instantly killed;
[Alexander] Saunders was wounded and [J. R.] Emerson left on the
field for dead.

Capt. [H. C.] Albright is the only captain left in the regiment
unhurt, and commands the regiment. Lieut.'s [J. A.] Lowe,
[M. B.] Blair, [T. J.] Cureton, and [C. M.] Sudderth are all of the
subalterns. Col. Faribault, of the Forty-seventh, is severely
wounded. Lieut.-Col. [J. A.] Graves and Maj. [A. D.]
Crudup supposed killed. Col. Marshall and Maj. [J. Q.] Richardson,
of the Fifty-second, supposed to be killed. Lieut.-Col.
Parks dangerously wounded; Col. Leventhorpe badly wounded;
Maj. Ross killed.

Our whole division numbers but only 1,500 or 1,600 effective men,
as officially reported, but, of course, a good many will still come in.
The division at the beginning numbered about 8,000 effective men.

I hear our army is generally badly cut up. We will fall back about
5 miles, to draw the enemy, if possible, from his impregnable position.

It was a second Fredericksburg affair, only the wrong way. We
had to charge over a mile a stone wall in an elevated position.

I learn the loss of the enemy is terrible. We have taken 10,000 or
15,000 prisoners in all. Yesterday, in falling back, we had to leave
the wounded; hence the uncertainty of a good many being killed
late yesterday evening. I must close.

Yours, truly,

J. J. YOUNG,
Capt., and Assistant Quartermaster.

His Excellency Gov. Zebulon B. Vance.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 27. Part II. Reports. Serial No. 44
..................................................................................................................................

Fifty-third North Carolina Infantry


Gettysburg after battle report:

Report of Col. William A. Owens, Fifty-third North Carolina Infantry.

July 19, 1863.
Sir: In the engagement at Gettysburg, Pa., my regiment took
part in the field as follows:

On July 1, I moved from Little Creek to within 2 miles of Gettysburg,
and was in line of battle at or about 1 o'clock, when we advanced
through an open field, coming in sight of the enemy on the
crest. The line moved forward some 200 yards, when I moved by
the left flank some 300 yards, under fire. I again moved to the front
some 50 or 100 yards, when I was ordered to take my regiment to
the support of Gen. Iverson. I again moved by the flank, and
brought them into line on the left of the Third Alabama, which was
on Gen. Iverson's right. I next moved to the right of the Third
Alabama, and moved forward through a wheat-field to within 50
yards of some woods in front. The Third Alabama fell back, leaving
my left exposed, and I ordered my regiment back some 50 yards,
it at this time being exposed to a fire on both flanks. I changed my
front to the right, to face the enemy on the right. I afterward
moved my regiment back to the position on the right of the Third
Alabama, which was then going off to the left. I fronted, and moved
forward to the woods, where I joined the right of the Twelfth North
Carolina Infantry, and moved on through the woods to the railroad
embankment, where I halted, and moved by the left to the edge of
the town, where I halted and remained during the night.

July 2, I was ordered to take position on the right of Col.
O'Neal, commanding Rodes' brigade, behind the railroad embankment,
my right resting at a very deep cut. Finding Col.
O'Neal's brigade would cover all the ground, I reported, and was
ordered to take position on the right of the brigade, which was in a
corn-field, and behind a section of Col. [T. H.] Carter's battery.
It was left at discretion with me to move my men, if they suffered
from the enemy's fire, but to remain within supporting distance. I
moved my regiment about 50 yards to the right, in rear of the left
of Gen. [J. H.] Lane's brigade, where I remained until dark, when
I was ordered to take my position on the right of the brigade. We
then moved forward about half a mile toward the enemy's position,
and remained about half an hour, when I moved by the left flank
to the road leading through town, and bivouacked in line for the
night.

July 3, at 3 a. m., I moved with the brigade through Gettysburg,
and around to the right of the enemy, which was about 4 miles, and
lay in line at the foot of a hill, the Thirty-second North Carolina
being on my right. After some skirmishing, I was ordered to move
by the left flank, to the support of some brigade on the left. I moved,
and was fronted behind a brigade, and then ordered forward. After
firing some little time, I was ordered to let my men fall back under
cover of the hill, keeping out my sharpshooters. Again I was
ordered forward, and kept position just under the edge of the crest
until, about 2 or 3 o'clock, I saw the regiments on my right and left
going back. I then ordered my men to fall back some 50 yards,
when I was ordered to move by the right flank, and was halted
about 150 yards from the position left, where I remained until 3 a.m.,
and then moved by a circuitous route back to the hills which we had
taken the first day, where we remained until Sunday (July 4), 3 a. m.,
when we left.

As to the casualties in my regiment, they were forwarded.* My
officers and men acted very well. I would especially mention Sergeant
[E. J.] Null, Company H, and Private [W. D.] McAdoo, Company
A, both, I am sorry to say, severely wounded.

There were many others who acted very gallantly, but these two
surpassed all.

Very respectfully,

W. A. OWENS,
Col., Comdg.

Capt. W. M. Hammond,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Source: Official Records: Series I. Vol. 27. Part II. Reports. Serial No. 44

*******************************************************************************​



There is no question that the North Carolina State Memorial includes one of the most impressive statues on the Gettysburg field. It is rarely missed on my car tours.

Thanks for also including the Official Report of the 53rd NC (Daniel's Brigade), who fought in others parts of the field. Pvt. Walter McAdoo, given special mention by Col. Owens, is my Sigma Chi fraternity brother from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. Fraternity lore has it that McAdoo renewed acquaintance with at least one brother still in Carlisle when Rhodes Division occupied the town. I have found records indicating that although McAdoo was left behind and captured, he was exchanged and returned to Confederate service.

It is also said that he was recognized among the wounded by a fiancee of one of his College pals and nursed at her home. (Sadly, I have never found primary sources to confirm these tales, and the Fraternity has no information as to where the story originated.)
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
There is no question that the North Carolina State Memorial includes one of the most impressive statues on the Gettysburg field. It is rarely missed on my car tours.

Thanks for also including the Official Report of the 53rd NC (Daniel's Brigade), who fought in others parts of the field. Pvt. Walter McAdoo, given special mention by Col. Owens, is my Sigma Chi fraternity brother from Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pa. Fraternity lore has it that McAdoo renewed acquaintance with at least one brother still in Carlisle when Rhodes Division occupied the town. I have found records indicating that although McAdoo was left behind and captured, he was exchanged and returned to Confederate service.

It is also said that he was recognized among the wounded by a fiancee of one of his College pals and nursed at her home. (Sadly, I have never found primary sources to confirm these tales, and the Fraternity has no information as to where the story originated.)

Thank you for sharing the additional info. I had relatives in Co.K of the 53rd from Wilkes County. One, Captain William J. Miller, was probably one of the first to fall.
 

NDR5thNY

Private
Joined
Nov 17, 2019
Location
Lumberton, NC
I wonder if the Name "Tom Dola/Dooley is on that roster, if so I'd like to see a pic of it.
I believe the correct spelling of the name is Tom Dula. He may be the most famous private from the Civil War. The Kingston Trio made him very famous. Governor Zebulon Vance represented Tom Dula at his trial. Governor Vance had been his commanding officer prior to running for Governor.
Governor’s Vance statue was recently removed from its place in Asheville, NC after 120 years.
 
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