Starr or star revolver

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Over the years of reading about the war here, I've come across references of Militia, guerrillas, and civilians having them. But seldom hear much about the revolvers themselves.

Where they manufactured in large number's, were they common elsewhere, how would they compare to colts?
 

ucvrelics

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There were only around 23,000 of them made for the army in single action. They made 3 models the 44 Army IMHO was the best.
 
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Mark A

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There were approximately 58,000 Starr revolvers manufactured in Binghamton and Yonkers, NY. Starr ranked third in number of revolvers purchased by the US Ordnance Dept (behind Colt and Remington) during the Civil War. The US purchased nearly 48,000 of Starr's revolvers.

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From poking around seems they also made a ACW carbine, a pepperbox, and had been a contractor on the 1817 common rifle, of which I guess quite a few had been converted to Percussion by/or for ACW.

Kinda surprised they are so relatively unknown. The 1817 common rifle is another I hadn't heard alot about.
 
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Curious how would 1817 rifle conversions compare to the more recent springfield\enfields? Due to age would they have lost most of their rifling? Suppose .54 could be rebored and rerifled to .58?
 

bayonet

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my understanding is they fetch a good $ for Collectors because of their bad reputation as unreliable. Or to quote a Union Officer "The Man who sold these pistols to the government and the Contractor who brought them ought to be hanged as Traitors"
 
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my understanding is they fetch a good $ for Collectors because of their bad reputation as unreliable. Or to quote a Union Officer "The Man who sold these pistols to the government and the Contractor who brought them ought to be hanged as Traitors"
Not to sure about that officers opinion since it was the 3rd most purchased by the government for a total of approx. 48000 revolvers. Starr must have had one hell of a salesman. He is possibly like many other teller of problems as not being knowledgeable of the weapon.
 

bayonet

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Not to sure about that officers opinion since it was the 3rd most purchased by the government for a total of approx. 48000 revolvers. Starr must have had one hell of a salesman. He is possibly like many other teller of problems as not being knowledgeable of the weapon.
There was a War starting up and the War Profiteers came out of the Woodwork. Same old story even these days. Everything I read it was not popular with the Troops but the Carbine was. Weapons needed to be supplied to the Troops. So much so both sides turned to overseas to get them. Might of worked well in the beginning but after numerous firings and the clogging of black powder residue could of caused problems on. Even today their is a well known brand of automatic pistols I avoid due to jamming. First round out of the box and it jammed followed by round #3.
 

johan_steele

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There was nothing wrong with the Starr pistol. MNy thought the DA pattern was too complicated

I’ve not read a real complaint about the Starr pistol past that. Many were converted to center fire cartridge post war so some certainly thought it worth bringing home.
 

bayonet

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There was nothing wrong with the Starr pistol. MNy thought the DA pattern was too complicated

I’ve not read a real complaint about the Starr pistol past that. Many were converted to center fire cartridge post war so some certainly thought it worth bringing home.
That DA was as complicated as the Savage to cock and fire. Loading that Starr was as bad as loading a Colt (but Colt still remained the most popular, go figure!). Your in trouble if you lose that screw/pin loading that Starr (same as losing your Colt wedge). I'd carry the Remington 1858 Army, so much easier to operate. No wonder you see pics of Troopers carrying 3 to 4 pistols, what pain to reload in the thick of it. Or better yet Custer at East Gettysburg, ordering the Troopers to put your pistols away and draw your Swords!
 
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I agree Remington was the best of the three, but there were other good revolvers as well. IMHO Colt was not necessarily the best, but had the best salesmanship. Sam knew how to make friends and slide the slippery slope with presentation pieces in the right places.
 

bayonet

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I agree Remington was the best of the three, but there were other good revolvers as well. IMHO Colt was not necessarily the best, but had the best salesmanship. Sam knew how to make friends and slide the slippery slope with presentation pieces in the right places.
Oh yeah that Sam Colt was one good War Profiteer. But last I saw his Hartford Factories were surrounded by run down buildings, poverty, and your sad looking Slums. But the Colt is still a top that blue dome.
 
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