Stained with the blood of Wisconsin heroes

lelliott19

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#1
Excerpted from the Journal Outdoor Science & Technology
by Marcus Schneck, Dec 18, 2014.


"On August 14, 1864, in a Union Army camp in Georgia, a captain from Wisconsin* plucked a plant, pressed it onto a sheet of paper, wrote a letter describing the plant as “certainly the most interesting specimen I ever saw,” and sent it with the plant to a scientist he called “Friend” in Wisconsin.

(*The writer of the letter was Capt John Cornelius McMullen. McMullen graduated from Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. On Sept 16, 1861, he enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant in Co H 1st Wisconsin Infantry at Sheboygan Falls. He was wounded and fought through Kentucky, Tennessee and into Georgia. The letter was written near Atlanta, Aug 14, 1864.)

"In his letter, McMullen laid out the circumstances of the First Wisconsin Regiment.
“We are now in plain view of the great commercial city of Georgia. My company are in the front line of works only a half mile from town and while I write shot and shells are constantly passing over us. It may be some days before Atlanta falls but in the end it must yield for the best army in the world are thundering at its gate."

Despite his surroundings – or perhaps because of them – McMullen concluded on a sentimental note,
“This flower was moistened by the blood of heroes, for Wisconsin men have died where it was plucked.”

Read the whole story by Marcus Schneck here http://outdoorscitech.com/50/
stained with blood of heros.jpg

 

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hanna260

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#2
“This flower was moistened by the blood of heroes, for Wisconsin men have died where it was plucked.”
This quote is so sad but true. Thanks for sharing it. The blood of heroes adorned a lot of places- they've stained and marked the various battlefields of Virginia and the South in so many ways. And the linked article is very interesting too!
 
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#3
The linked article was very interesting to me. Captain McMullin found a little solace (and, I suppose, some irony) in the plant while artillery shells were rumbling overhead. The article suggests that his friend, a Quaker, might have been indifferent to McMullin's musings about the plant being stained with the blood of heroes. However, I imagine the friend might have been touched by the gift of the specimen, nonetheless. (I suppose if the author of the linked article can speculate, then so can I). Thanks for posting this.
 
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#4
Lovely article. It's interesting that this letter turned up in such an unexpected place.

I had to look up the plant. It's commonly called sicklepod or Chinese Cassia. Butterflies eat it, livestock can be poisoned by it, and it's a problem for soybean farmers. It also has pretty yellow flowers.
 

rhettbutler1865

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#6
Lovely article. It's interesting that this letter turned up in such an unexpected place.

I had to look up the plant. It's commonly called sicklepod or Chinese Cassia. Butterflies eat it, livestock can be poisoned by it, and it's a problem for soybean farmers. It also has pretty yellow flowers.
Allie--please take the compliment...you are so thorough with your replies--you amaze me! You are indeed a real asset to this forum!:smile:
 



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