Ami's SOA Stained Glass Windows of the Civil War...

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5fish

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Here is one of Lincoln as a young person::::

http://lacanadacongregationalchurch.org/history/

La Cañada Congregational Church
1200 Foothill Blvd.
La Cañada Flintridge, CA 91011
w02_lincoln.gif


Theme: ABRAHAM LINCOLN
Inscription: “All that I am I owe to my angel Mother.”
Features: The young Abraham Lincoln sits next to his mother, reading the Bible. A small picture of the nation’s Capitol is in the upper left of the window, heralding Lincoln’s destiny.
Dedication: In memory of Mrs. Kate LeLansky by her son, Dr.Ross LeLansky, February, 1957.
 
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Pvt. Jacob Kreger, a Stained Glass window in his Honor...

Link: http://142ndpainfantry.blogspot.com/2011/07/

Stained glass windows from the Kingwood Church of God, Upper Turkeyfoot Twp, Somerset County, PA
Kreger+Window%252C+Kingwood+COG.jpg


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As previously stated, the memorial service was held inside the Kingwood Church of God. The land for this church was donated by Pvt. Jacob Kreger, and a set of stained glass windows in the sanctuary still bear witness to his generosity.
 

5fish

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In honor of one's son... http://lafayettepark.org/war/

Bredell Family

Edward Bredell, pioneer St. Louis businessman, proponent of public schools and philanthropist, resided at 2110 Lafayette Avenue in the 1860’s. A sympathizer of the Southern cause, Mr. Bredell refused to take the loyalty oath in support of the Union.

His wife, Angeline Perry Bredell, secretly served throughout the war as a communication courier for the Confederates via her regular wartime travels into the south.

Edward Jr. enlisted and received a commission in the Confederate Army. He was assigned to duty on the staff of General Charles Feifer, and commanded a brigade of Missouri troops. Lieutenant Bredell later transferred to General Mosby’s command and was killed on November 16, 1864 at Berry’s Ferry, Virginia.


Edward Bredell Sr. travelled personally to Virginia to accompany his son’s remains to St. Louis. Following refusal for a burial permit by the City of St. Louis, Mr. Bredell was forced to bury his son in the rear garden of his home on Lafayette Avenue until a permit was issued for public burial. The bereaved parents later donated a window in memory of their son. Edward Jr., which still exists in the former Lafayette Park Presbyterian Church on Missouri Avenue.

BredellWindow2.jpg
 

5fish

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Not a great photo...

This is the beautiful stained glass window, in honor of Chamberlain's father-in-law, the Rev. George Adams, who was a pastor here for over 25 years.

First Parish Church, Brunswick, ME
jlcwindow.jpg


From the PHS, I wandered up the street to First Parish Church, hopeful it was open, so I could sneak in for a visit. Thankfully, it was! I tiptoed in, and heard organ music coming from the sanctuary. I could well imagine the young Joshua, singing in the First Parish choir, and eventually becoming its director.

I walked quietly around the outer aisles, and sat down behind the Chamberlain family pew (which is marked by a plaque; opposite theirs is the one occupied by Harriet Beecher Stowe--who got a vision of Uncle Tom's death while at a communion service, which inspired her to write her famous novel). I didn't feel right about sitting in the Chamberlains' pew.... So I sat there for a little while, gazing around this lovely old church, and reflecting on the role it played in Chamberlain's life. Here is where he conducted the church choir--and met Fannie, and married her; gave away his daughter Grace in marriage, and also buried his two baby daughters. Here, he probably presided over several Bowdoin commencements and other college events--and is where both his funeral, and Fannie's, too, were held. Behind the altar is a huge stained-glass window, designed by Chamberlain in memory of his father-in-law, the Rev. George Adams. I got a picture of it, and I'm glad to say it came out pretty well!


Link to the rest of Chamberlain links to this church: http://www.lurker00.com/joshua1/jlctrip.htm
 
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I found these Stained glass windows of Grant in a thread... Grant visited this church too...

Link to the thread more photos there::: https://civilwartalk.com/threads/long-branch-new-jersey.113191/#post-1114220

A little church history:::http://www.stlukesumclb.org/our-history/
St. Luke’s has been standing tall at this present location for more than 156 years. St. Luke’s U.M.C. was first organized in March 5, 1860. The building was dedicated on July 25, 1869. Unfortunately, a major catastrophe struck when the church building was burned to the ground on the night of January 12, 1893.

Fortunately, the people went to work immediately to erect a better building. In July 8, 1894 the present stone structure was dedicated. It’s an emblem of resilience and dedication of the St. Luke’s members all through the generations.

In a history of St. Luke’s Church its stained glass windows (especially its rose windows) must be mentioned. There are three circular windows each measuring 15 feet in diameter.

One of which is called the Peace Window, paying tribute to our Soldier-President U.S. Grant, a frequent visitor to the church and a summer resident to the shore.




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I found this Chapel at Ft. Monroe called CHAPEL OF THE CENTURION. It has many stained glass windows with civil war backgrounds. These are from Nave One, there are other windows as well...

well... http://www.orderofcenturions.org/chapel_of_the_centurion/index.html

Opening History Nave one:.... http://www.orderofcenturions.org/chapel_of_the_centurion/index.html
Religious services at Fort Monroe began on a regular basis in 1825 when the Reverend Mark Chevers came to the fort. He was the rector of St. John's Episcopal Church, Hampton. For several years he came to Fort Monroe on alternate Sundays to various quarters for services. 1 December 1838, he became the Post Chaplain and continued that assignment until his death, 13 September 1875, having served the garrison over fifty years. A small chapel in the Chapel Center is named in honor of Chaplain Chevers.

22 June 1855, an explosion in the mixing room of the laboratory in the arsenal at the fort killed Francis M. McKnight and Henry Sheffis, two artificers working with Lieutenant Julian McAllister. McAllister's thankfulness for God's sparing his life resulted in the construction of the chapel.

Through the personal efforts of Lieutenant McAllister and his Commander, Captain Alexander B. Dyer, $6,000.00 was donated for the construction of the chapel. Richard Upjohn, noted architect, designed the building [HN1] and construction began in 1856. Bishop John Johns from the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia consecrated the chapel 3 May 1858.


l1.jpg


"Crown of Life"
After 1906 - Mark 14:9 and Revelation 2:106
(originally on the right side near the balcony)

In memory of Mary Hammond Ware, born at Ft. Monroe in 1865 and died here in 1906. During her years at Ft. Monroe she was a devoted chapel member where she taught a Sunday School Class, played the organ, sang in the choir, and was president of the Ladies' Auxiliary. Her father was Superintendent of Construction for the batteries and harbor defense. He was originally the post blacksmith. Mr. Ware cut the shackles from Jefferson Davis before Davis was moved from his cell in the casemate to Carroll Hall (no longer standing). Her brother, Captain S. H. Ware supervised the building of fortifications at Pearl Harbor. Originally the window had the proper middle initial, "H," after the fire of 1933, the craftsman identified the letter as "A."
The Crown of Life Window reads "Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a crown of life


L2.jpg


"Ionic Corinthian Column"
c. 1880

In memory of Brevet Brigadier General C. H. Morgan, served at Ft. Monroe 1857-59 and became the Superintendent of Practical Artillery here from 1869 to 1871. He died on Alcatraz Island in California in December 1875. The window was given by "Engineer Roebling and various officers of the Second Army Corps."
The Corinthian Column Window reads "In Memory of Bvt Brig Genl C H Morgan, Major, 4th Artillery Died Dec 2? 1875

L4.jpg


"Per Mare, Per Terras"
c. 1890 - Psalm 132:3-6 and St. Luke- 7:5
Tiffany Glass & Decorating Co.

In memory of Colonel Julian McAllister who served at Ft. Monroe from May 1853 until August 1857. He had graduated first in the Class of 1847 at West Point. After leaving here in 1857 he served at posts in New York and California. Julian McAllister probably never saw the completed chapel he had so generously contributed toward building. (Additional comments about Julian McAllister will be found elsewhere in this booklet.)
The window reads Surely I will not come into the tabernacle of my house, nor go up into my bed; I will not give sleep to mine eyes, or slumber to mine eyelids, Until I find out a place for the LORD, an habitation for the mighty God of Jacob. Lo, we heard of it at Ephratah: we found it in the fields of the wood. Prov cxxxii "For he hath loved our nation and hath built us a synagogue. St. Luke vii Colonel J McAllister, Born Oct 19, 18?? Died Jan ?? 1887.

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"Peace Window"
1958 - R. Geissler, Inc., New York

The window was designed by Mrs. P. E. Winn and Colonel Eugene C. Jacobs, Commander, US Army Hospital, Ft. Monroe, for the Chapel Centennial. The patches are those of the six armies, at that time part of the Continental Army Command. The flags were those of 1858 and 1958. The Civil War soldier is copied from a tintype of Colonel Jacob's grandfather, who served here in the Civil War as a member of the New York Heavy Artillery. He was present at Appomattox when General Robert E. Lee surrendered. The names of those who contributed to the window's purchase are listed on the wall plaque.
The window reads "Continental Command Chapel Centennial 1858 - 1958"
 

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CHAPEL OF THE CENTURION has a second nave and more stained Glass windows...

Another history of the church with photos: http://www.chapelofthecenturion.org/history.php

Snippet...
The Chapel of the Centurion is named after the Roman Centurion, Cornelius, who was brought to Christianity by Peter. Until the last religious service by the US Army - on August 21, 2011 - The Chapel of the Centurion was the Army's oldest wooden structure in continuous use for religious services.

RELIGIOUS SERVICES AT FORT MONROE BEGAN ON A REGULAR BASIS IN 1825 . . .

when the Reverend Mark Chevers came to the fort. He was the rector of St. John's Episcopal Church, Hampton. For several years he came to Fort Monroe on alternate Sundays to various quarters for services. On December 1, 1838, he became the Post Chaplain and continued that assignment until his death (September 13, 1875), having served the garrison over fifty years. A small chapel in the Chapel Center is named in his honor.

On June 22, 1855, an explosion in the mixing room of the laboratory in the arsenal at the fort killed Francis M. McKnight and Henry Sheffis, two artificers working with 1st Lt. Julian McAllister. It was McAllister's thankfulness for God's sparing his life that would result in the construction of The Chapel of the Centurion.

Note: People mention in these windows some have wiki pages:::

R1.jpg


"Well Done Thou Good and Faithful Servant"
ESSAYONS (Let us try)
c. 1880 (Earlier ?)

In memory of Colonel Rene Edward De Russy, Superintendent of Engineering Construction here from 1838 to 1854. He served 57 years on continuous active duty as an officer after graduating from West Point in 1812. Ft. De Russy in Hawaii was named for him.
The window reads "Essayons Rene Edward DeRussy Colonel of Engineers Born Feb 27, 1789 Cadet USMA March 20, 1807, Died Nov 23, 1865 58 Years of Service Well Done Thy Good and Faithful Servant" "


R2.jpg



"St. Alban"
c. 1890

In memory of Brevet Major General Emory Upton, the "boy wonder" of the Civil War. Commissioned a Second Lieutenant when he graduated from West Point in 1861, Upton successively commanded a battery of artillery, infantry regiment, infantry brigade, artillery brigade, and finally a division of cavalry. He was breveted to Brigadier General in 1864. Upton's troops captured Little Round Top at Gettysburg. At age 28 he was the Commandant of the US Military Academy. General Sherman sent him with two other officers around the world to study the armies of Europe and Asia. Upton's book The Military Policy of the United States was a penetrating look at our military policies and forces. He served as the Director of Artillery Tactics in the Artillery School here from 1877 to 1880. At age 42 he committed suicide while suffering from an incurable disease.
The window reads "In Memory of Brevt Major General Emory Upton, Colonel 4th Artillery "

R3.jpg


"The Armor of God"
1879

In memory of Brevet Captain Albion Howe by his wife, Sarah McKnight Barry (daughter of Major General William F. Barry). Captain Howe was killed at Lava Beds, California, while fighting Modoc Indians. The window is one of the two oldest stained glass windows in the chapel. It is an example of enameled glass of the John Bolton school.
The window reads "Faith Unto Death, In Mormoriam, ?? Capt 4th Arty ?? of 1869"

R4.jpg


"Sheaf of Wheat"
1879

In memory of Caroline Matilda Barry, mother of Major General William F. Barry. The window is a companion of the Howe Window. The second of the two oldest windows in the Nave.
The window reads, "In Memoriam Caroline Matilda Barry ?? 1871 "


R5.jpg



"Taps"
1958 - R. Geissler, New York

For the Centennial Celebration, Colonel Eugene Jacobs designed this window to commemorate the first playing of "Taps" for the burial of a soldier at Harrison Landing (present site of Berkley Plantation near Williamsburg on the James River). Brevet Brigadier General Daniel Butterfield, commanded the 3rd Brigade of Infantry, was an exponent of bugle calls. He was not satisfied with the final call of the day known as "Lights Out." Around 4 July 1862 he called the brigade bugler, Oliver W. Norton, to his tent and showed him some notes he had written on the back of an envelope. After getting it properly arranged, Norton was directed to play it that night. Several days later a soldier died in Captain John C. Tidball's Battery A. Rather than fire the customary three rifle volleys to honor the dead soldier, Captain Tidball instructed Oliver Norton to play "Taps." The custom of playing "Taps" at a military funeral had begun in a unit of soldiers from this fort. The picture from which the window is crafted shows a drummer boy standing beside the bugler, the grandson of the drummer boy later purchased the Berkley Plantation. (Additional remarks on Daniel Butterfield will be found elsewhere in this booklet).
The window reads, "Taps 1862"


 
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Here are some Harvard Memorial Hall stained Glass windows... The one relating to the civil war... symbolism... if they did not write and explanation you would never know they were civil war stained glass memorial windows...

Stained Glass Windows

Overview
Because they represent such a variety of designers, manufacturers and techniques, the collection of stained glass in Memorial Hall comprises a veritable museum of American stained glass. Artistic styles range from the traditional European techniques employed by the British designers of the earlier windows to the innovative use of new glass forms which are hallmarks of the American or Opalescent Style first developed by John La Farge and Louis Comfort Tiffany. Installed between 1879 and 1902, the majority of windows were commissioned and funded by various alumni classes. The Harvard Corporation's original guidelines for the windows required that:

Each window shall contain one or more upright figures, about the size of life, with an ornamental panel or inscription occupying the ventilator panel below, all with a boarder or canopy; and that these figures shall be typical or historical. The choice of design is also restricted to characters prior to the time of Shakespeare, it being the intention that the windows, when all complete, shall unite harmoniously into one great theme.

These guidelines were loosened over time. For example "typical and historical" was expanded to include allegorical figures such as Honor and Peace. The most apparent deviation from the Corporation's original guidelines is in John La Farge's Battle Window which depicts a continuous scene rather than one figure per lancet. The Battle Window is a gift of the class of 1860 which lost twelve classmates, including Robert Gould Shaw, to the Civil War. Approximately half of the windows illustrate Civil War-related themes while the others depict cultural, literary and historic subjects.

La Farge executed four windows for Memorial Hall. Other highlights include two windows by Sarah Wyman Whitman and three windows executed by Tiffany Studios. The one unfinished window on the south wall of Annenberg Hall will be completed in memory of Roger Annenberg, '62.

All Materials taken from The Stained Glass Windows in Memorial Hall, Harvard University by Mason Hammond. Cambridge, Mass: (The author), 1978.



Bernard and Godefroy
window12.jpg


Artist: Edward Sperry
Manufacturer: Church Decorating Company
Date: 1902
Type: Plated opalescent
Funded by: Class of 1855
In the left half stands Bernard (1090-1153), a member of the Cistercian order of Benedictines, who founded the reformed and ascetic monastery of Clairvaux. He wears a long white monk’s robe with a cross hanging from his neck. His right arm is raised bestowing a blessing. His left arm holds a large closed book next to the pectoral cross. In the right half Godefroy, a German commander who conquered Jerusalem in 1099 and was then later elected its ruler, wears a white tunic over armor. A patterned red cloak with a purple lining is clasped around his neck. With his right arm grasping a long sword, his left arm is extended holding a white banner which shows above his head in its folds a red crusader’s cross.
Under each figure in the cross-bars is inscribed four different virtues: left, under Bernard, FIDES * SPES = Trust * Hope; and right, under Godefroy, CARITAS * FORTITUDO = Love * Fortitude. Faith, Hope and Charity are the familiar virtues from St. Paul, I Corinthians 13.13, and Fortitude is an apt description of both Bernard and Godefroy.
What is special about this window is that represented in the figures are the faces of contemporary persons. Bernard has the features of Phillips Brooks (1835-1893), class of 1855, who was the rector of Trinity Church in Boston and a very well-known preacher and religious leader. Godefroy has the features of Francis Channing Barlow (1834-1896), class of 1855, who rose from private to Major General during the Civil War and after the war, refusing a permanent commission in the army, devoted himself to politics and law.

John Hampden and Leonidas
window14.jpg


Artist: Daniel Cottier
Manufacturer: Daniel Cottier
Date: 1882
Type: English painted, no plating
Funded by: Class of 1858
In the left half stands John Hampden, a leader in the opposition of Parliament to the arbitrary rule of Charles I in England. He was wounded in the battle of Chalgrove Field against Prince Rupert on June 18, 1643, and died on June 24. He wears a dark coat with a broad white collar. A russet cloak hangs from his left shoulder down his back and left side. In the right half is Leonidas, a Spartan King who commanded the Greek forces sent to hold the pass of Thermopylae in 480 BC against the advance of the Persian host under their king Xerxes. He was destroyed by the Persians when they outflanked his position. He is wearing a white tunic with a full yellow-brown cloak passing over his left shoulder and under his right arm. The meaning of this window is similar to Window #5, Sydney and Epaminondas. The death of both men (Hampden and Leonidas) in battle commemorates the valor and patriotism of the individuals from Harvard who died in the Civil War.

Student and Soldier
window13.jpg


Artist: Francis Millet
Manufacturer: Tiffany Studios
Date: 1889
Type: Plated opalescent
Funded by: Class of 1861
In the left half the Student stands wearing a dark embroidered jacket or doublet. He has a short black cape around his shoulders and black hose and slippers. His left arm is stretched down and out from his body holding a book. In the right half the Soldier stands wearing a dark head covering. Under this covering is a black chain mail hood which comes up from his body armor and surrounds his face closely, revealing it only from the eyebrows to just below the mouth. Over his black chain mail body armor is a gray surcoat or tunic with a red cross on the chest. In his left hand he holds the staff of a gray and black banner whose folds he clasps at the level of the top of his head. The symbolic quality of the Soldier or Scholar is to show charity to those in worse case than themselves. (see p. 291) They emphasize the heroism of those who died in the Civil War.

Sophocles and Shakespeare
window08.jpg


Artist: Frederic Crowninshield
Manufacturer: McPherson
Date: 1883
Type: Plated opalescent
Funded by: Class of 1854
In the left half of the window stands the Athenian tragic poet Sophocles (495-406 BCE). Wearing a reddish tunic and wrapped in a blue robe he holds in his left hand a partly unrolled scroll. Above Sophocles is a frieze with four dancing youths. Under him is a sarcophagus. In the right half stands the English dramatic poet Shakespeare (1564-1616) looking away from Sophocles. He is wearing a reddish doublet, knee-britches, hose and shoes. In his right hand he holds before his stomach an open book. There is also a frieze above Shakespeare displaying a lying horned stag and a lying doe. The relevancy of this window to the Union dead is unknown.

Sidney and Epaminondas
window05.jpg


Artist: Daniel Cottier
Manufacturer: Daniel Cottier
Date: 1879
Type: English painted, no plates
Funded by: Class of 1857
This window shows the Elizabethan poet Sir Philip Sidney wearing a costume of black doublet and britches and hose with a high white ruff at his neck and a dark red cloak off his shoulders. At his left side hangs a sword crossing down behind his legs. In his left hand he holds a sheet of paper on which five lines are written in small Latin capital letters. They read MY TRUE LOVE HATH/ MY HEART AND I HAVE HIS/ BY JUST EXCHANGE ONE TO/ THE OTHER GIVEN/ I HOLD HI . . . . Sidney died from a wound in the Battle of Zutphen. In the right half, stands Epaminondas (418-362 B.C.E.), a well-educated Theban, who with the help of his colleague Pelopidas, defeated Sparta. He stands squarely front wearing a white tunic with a belt at the waist and a heavy red robe clasped on his right shoulder. He holds a short sword in his right hand and in his left hand, down by his side, he holds two spears vertically. Wounded in the Theban victory over Sparta at Mantinea in 362, he died soon after. Considering that both men were scholars and patriotic soldiers who died from wounds received in battle, they are fitting emblems to commemorate the Union dead of the class.


Dante and Chaucer

window04.jpg


Artist: Henry Holiday
Manufacturer: Powell and Sons
Date: 1879
Type: English painted, no plates
Funded by: Class of 1844
This window pictures Dante (left half) in a full length light colored robe. With a wreath on his head he stands to the front holding a book against his right breast. On either side of him are columns with ribbons bearing names of characters, which are essentially illegible, from the Divina Comedia. On the right is Chaucer standing toward Dante with a paper in his left hand before his stomach and a book in his right hand, against his side. On either side of him are ribbons wrapped around columns bearing names from the Canterbury Tales. The meaning of this window for the Civil War dead is difficult to tell.

Honor and Peace
window01.jpg


Artist: Sarah Wyman Whitman Manufacturer: Sarah Wyman Whitman
Date: 1900
Type: American opalescent
Funded by: Class of 1865
This window commemorates those;who surrendered their lives in the War of the Rebellion,” this window shows left, “Honor” sending forth an armed warrior to battle. On the right is “Peace” welcoming him in Ïhis civilian clothes with a wreath. There is no commemorative inscription; however, the two halves most likely refer to the members of the class who went to war (honor) and then returned home (peace).

Christopher Columbus and Admiral Robert Blake
window03.jpg


Artist: Henry Holiday
Manufacturer: Powell and Sons
Date: 1880
Type: English painted, no plates
Funded by: Family of Rear Admiral Charles Henry Davis
The left half shows Columbus with his hand rested on a globe upheld by a tripodal stand. The right shows Admiral Robert Blake (1599-1657) holding the handle of a sword that reaches up across his body and out past his left shoulder. Understanding that these two individuals have been celebrated for their different explorations,
this window appears to be a tribute to the Rear Admiral’s own successes. ( a little self-promotion)
 
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5fish

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This large window is at Harvard Memorial Hall...

Artist: Sarah Wyman Whitman
Manufacturer: Sarah Wyman Whitman
Date: 1898
Type: Plated Opalescent
Funded by: Martin Brimmer (Class of 1849)
Given in memory of the “sons of Harvard” who gave their lives in the Civil War and whose names are recorded in the tablets in the transept. The window was designed by the artist “to commemorate the forces which inspired these heroes. Love of the University is, at one end of the five lower panels, by the Scholar; and at the other end, Love of Country, by the Soldier. Above these are four cherubs holding tablets inscribed with the heroic virtues (Amor, Honor, Virtvs, Patientia = Love, Honor, Courage, Patience); and higher still are angelic figures of praise, while the design culminates in a Rose, wherein the ascription of Glory to God is typified in color, with a choir of angels circling round the center.” This circular window or rose at the top consists of a central rose of dark red and blue glass in floral patterns. Sixteen small circles around this show angels playing musical instruments. In the lower corners of the triangular upper portion of the window are two roundels with angels holding ribbons. The ribbons read “NON NOBIS DOMINE NON NOMIS * SED NOMINE TVO GLORIA SIT” = “Not to us, O Lord, not to us, but to thy name may there be glory.” The window also contains the VE-RI-TAS shield of Harvard and a long Latin inscription that translates to, “Greetings whoever art present. Thou seest the names of those men of Harvard who, fervent youths or men of more mature counsel, sought death that the state [or the Republic] might remain whole. Those (institutions or principles) which they, by dying, preserved, do thou cultivate while thou livest so that men among us may be more free, happy, united.”


Knight, St. Martin and the Beggar, Inscription, Sidney at Zutphen, Scholar.
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South_window_of_Memorial_Transept%2C_Memorial_Hall%2C_Harvard.jpg


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Abraham Lincoln and Moses...

Christ Church Cathedral of St. Louis holds a fascinating stained-glass window incorporating Abraham Lincoln and Moses, reminding us that the central message of Christianity is of liberation.

It, not a great photo but there's a video of the windows... it has a church theme but good images of the window...

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5fish

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I found this relate civil war stained glass window while looking up Harvey Scouts... It's the best photo of the window I could find...

http://www.howcutt.org/william hill howcott.htm

William Hill Howcott was born on 1 July 1847 in Mississippi - probably at or near Canton, which is the main town in Madison county. He was the fourth of the five known children of Judge John B Howcott and his wife Elizabeth W (formerly Jones).

He served in Captain Addison Harvey’s Scouts during the Civil War. Most of the members of this Confederate unit were recruited from Madison county. Union forces destroyed the Howcott home at Canton during the War, resulting in Elizabeth Howcott sharing her slaves' quarters.

William Howcott, a clerk, is recorded at 186 Common in Gardner’s Directory of New Orleans, 1869. He was later involved in the cotton business and went on to become highly successful in dealing in real estate in Louisiana.


He married Mary Edith, daughter of John and Harriet Louise Watt, at New Orleans on 14 December 1875 – the picture to the left is her wedding portrait. As well as two children whose names have not been found, their offspring were:


· Harley Alexander Watt (1878-1930)

· Louise (1879-1890)

· Edith Elizabeth Mary Delgado (1882-1965)

· William Hill (1891-1907)

· Gladys (1891-1976)

· Constance (1893-1895)

Mary Edith Watt Howcott died 14 May 1893 at the old John Watt residence, Carondelet Street. This was less than one month after she gave birth to her youngest child.

In 1917, William Howcutt also provided a stained glass window at Grace Episcopal Church, Canton, in memory of his mother Elizabeth W Howcott.

Canton%20Grace%20Howcott%20window%20-%20small.jpg
 
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Here are Stained Glass windows of the old west: All aboard! Union Pacific Depot in Salt Lake City

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/705331568/All-aboard-Union-Pacific-Depot-turns-100.html

In early August 1909, Salt Lake City was gearing up for what would be the largest convention in the city's history: the 43rd Encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Perhaps as many as 70,000 Civil War veterans, their families and other visitors would arrive in the city, and most would come by rail.

Salt Lake's rail yards received daily notices of special trains and special cars that would be bringing delegates to the convention, and the city was all set to put on a grand spectacle for them.


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The place they are located at...
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Last edited:

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,275
Location
Central Florida
A Stained Glass Window with Portraits of Lincoln, Edison, Carnegie and the Niagara Falls

Where... Munich's City Hall, Germany
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Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
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