Ami's SOA Stained Glass Windows of the Civil War...

5fish

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Edwin Booth has a Stained Glass window in his honor... It was done by La Farge, John, 1835-1910; New York a famous stained glass maker/artist

“Actor Contemplating a Mask, the Edwin Booth Memorial Window by John La Farge”

Edwin Booth Memorial Window
Church of the Transfiguration,
1 E 29th Street,
New York, New York 10016


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Read under the window...
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The quote:
“As one, in suffering all, that suffers nothing,

A man that fortune 's buffets and rewards

Hast ta'en with equal thanks.”

(‘Hamlet,’ iii, 2.)
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Are some link that tells the story of the window...

https://library.bc.edu/lafargeglass/exhibits/show/descriptions/all-saints-cathedral/transfiguration

The Church of the Transfiguration, also known as “The Little Church Around the Corner,” is famous in theatrical circles. The church was built in 1849 by an unknown architect. It contains one of the most remarkable stained glass windows by John La Farge.
In 1895, John La Farge was commissioned to make a memorial window for Edwin Booth (1833-1893), the most famous Shakespearean actor of his era. He was also the older brother of John Wilkes Booth (1838-1865), the man who assassinated Abraham Lincoln. Between 1879-83, Edwin Booth developed a notable summer cottage in the Paradise Valley region of Newport, RI, where John La Farge had also lived.[1]
The design for the Booth window is based on an earlier illustration for Dramatis Personae, a collection of poems by Robert Browning.[2]
 
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5fish

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Edwin donated a Stained Glass window to a chapel in RI. in memory of his first wife...

https://ebooth-myhamlet.livejournal.com/16789.html

Mary Devlin Booth Memorial Window
"In the rear of the church, high up in the wall, is a peculiar yet mesmerizing window depicting a woman holding a dove to her breast. She stands in a brilliant blue niche constructed of hundreds of tiny rectangular pieces of tile-like pieces of glass. Around the niche is golden architecture. Although the artist and manufacturer of this window are unknown, the history of its donor is quite famous: this lovely window is dedicated to the first wife of the illustrious 19th century actor, Edwin Booth, whose fame has been eclipsed in our century by the notoriety of his brother, John Wilkes Booth, assassin of Abraham Lincoln. Edwin Booth and his daughter, Edwina, summered in the Newport area, building a house just down the street from the chapel. They were involved with the construction of the church from the beginning and in 1885 donated this window - the first in the building - in memory of Edwina's mother, Mary Devlin, who died in 1863."
http://www.stcolumbaschapel.org/buildings.htm
http://www.jlsloan.com/menuprof.htm
http://www.dmstainedglass.com/Restorations.html
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Susan B. Anthony stained glass window...

Members of all the clubs worked for women's suffrage. Susan B. Anthony's biographer, Ida Husted Harper, spoke of Hester Jeffrey as "a woman of education and influence who was often at Anthony's Rochester home," the headquarters for the National American Woman Suffrage Association. Hester was invited into the Rochester Political Equality Club. She was the only local layperson chosen to give a eulogy at Susan B. Anthony's funeral service in 1906. The following year Hester arranged for the first memorial to the suffrage leader, a beautiful stained glass portrait window for the new AME Zion Church. Below Susan B. Anthony's face are her prophetic words: "Failure Is Impossible."


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zMzNDA5MGMtZjVkYy00NWJkLTg5ZGYtODJkNTg1ZTc1OTRlL2ltYWdlL2ltYWdlXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjc3NDgwNzU@._V1_.jpg


Susan B. Anthony's home...

https://somuchworldsolittletime.com/tag/susan-b-anthony/

A M E Church

http://minorityreporter.net/memoria...rt-in-rochester-with-black-tie-event-sept-29/
 

5fish

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5fish

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Here is one to a fallen soldier...

Lieutenant Nathaniel Ingersoll Bowditch (1839- 1863).
NatBowditch.jpg


Two panels in the upper middle of the window over our organ loft were given in 1865 by William R. Lawrence in memory of Lt. Nathaniel Bowditch, who fell at Kelly’s Ford, Virginia, on March 18, 1863. He had been Assistant Adjutant to Colonel Duffie in the First Massachusetts Cavalry Brigade. The window was designed by his father, physician Henry Ingersoll Bowditch, who privately printed a Memorial for his son, the grandson of the navigator and mathematician.

Note the initials NB for Nathaniel Bowditch.
West-Window-middle.jpg
 

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5fish

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Here is one to a fallen a soldier...

Memorial window at the Soldiers Memorial Building
in Lebanon, dedicated to Sergeant George B. Tracy of
Lebanon, who was wounded at Spottsylvania, VA,
in 1864, and died several weeks later in Washington, DC.
Designed by Lebanon architect Ferdinand Davis, the
Soldiers Memorial Building on Colburn Park was built
from 1886 to 1890, largely from local brick, slate, and
oak. Private collection.

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Here is a link to a Soldiers Home: http://nh-preservation.blogspot.com/

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“The law passed in 1885 for the relief of indigent soldiers had an excellent purpose, but its execution has shown some defects. As such persons are to be supported, according to this law, by the towns or cities where they live, overseers of the poor very naturally have classed them with paupers. Many feel humiliated by the name, and therefore refuse to accept the support they deserve. As these men were sent to the war by the State, it would seem that the State should furnish the proper relief, and thus take away the stigma of pauper.”
Governor’s Message, State of New Hampshire Annual Report, 1889
 

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Here form these ... https://salient-points.blogspot.com/2016/12/franklin-county-soldiers-memorial-hall.html

Franklin County Soldiers Memorial Hall

Nearly twenty years after the Civil War, the people of Franklin County, Iowa decided to build a memorial honoring the Union war heroes. They wanted to recognize the 169 men from the county who fought in the war and especially the 44 soldiers who died in the conflict.

The seven (six shown here) arched, stained glass windows each have a different motif, incorporating Civil War themes relating to weaponry and the soldiers' gear that were used in the war.

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Hampton_2.jpg


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Hampton_5.jpg


Hampton_4.jpg

 

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Here is a tribute to Robert E Lee but you will have to read about the window to understand why???

Henry Holiday, Moses
shown the Promised Land
,
Memorial to Robert E. Lee,
upper half, 1892, St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church, Richmond,
Virginia.
Photo: Michel M. Raguin

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Here the bottom edge of the window to Lee...
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Henry Holiday: Robert E. Lee (allusion to Moses leading his people out of Egypt)
In 1889, St. Paul’s appointed a committee to develop “two conspicuous windows to be dedicated as memorial windows to perpetuate the names of Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis.” Robert E. Lee (1807-1870) was the chief military officer of the Confederacy and Jefferson Davis (1808-1889) its president. 20 Lee has been admired to this day as a brilliant battlefield tactician, and Davis, to some, acquired the mantle of long-suffering champion of the cause of States Rights. 21 Their windows are located midway in the aisles, opposite each other.

The two modern heroes are associated with the biblical prototypes, Moses and St. Paul respectively. Henry Holiday produced a brilliantly drafted window, installed in 1892. The lower level depicts Moses leaving Egypt and above, Moses on Mount Nebo, where God allowed him to see the Promised Land before he died. The window carries a dedicatory inscription “In Grateful Memory of Robert Edward Lee Died October 12th 1870.” The youthful image of Moses leading his people out of Egypt, typical of Holiday’s classicizing manner, presents a dramatic profile of determination. The background is charged with rich details of Egyptian wall painting, architectural relief, and costumes.

Photo: Michel M. Raguin produced a brilliantly drafted window, installed in 1892. The lower level depicts Moses leaving Egypt and above, Moses on Mount Nebo, where God allowed him to see the Promised Land before he died. The window carries a dedicatory inscription “In Grateful Memory of Robert Edward Lee Died October 12th 1870.” The youthful image of Moses leading his people out of Egypt, typical of Holiday’s classicizing manner, presents a dramatic profile of determination. The background is charged with rich details of Egyptian wall painting, architectural relief, and costumes. Moses exits down a set of stairs guarded by a statue of a Moses exits down a set of stairs guarded by a statue of a
aged. Looking back towards an unseen enemy, he gestures to his followers.
On the balcony level, Moses is now aged. His beard, hair and profile are remarkably similar to
Catalogactual portraits of Lee. The Angels carry a banderole, “the eternal God is thy refuge and underneath are the everlasting arms,” a quotation from Deuteronomy 33:27 that if continued would have read, “He will drive out your enemy before you, saying, 'Destroy him!'” Holiday has shown segments of the mountain piercing the striated clouds that separate the divine encounter from the scene below. In darker tones, almost devoid of color, are the Israelites camped before their tents on the plains of Moab. They appear as a great mass of people, looking upwards.

http://college.holycross.edu/RaguinStainedGlassInAmerica/Memorial/Memorial.html
 

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Here is one to Jefferson Davis again you will have to read...

Frederick Wilson, designer,
Tiffany Studios, Paul before Herod
Agrippa
, Memorial to Alexander Jackson
David, detail, 1896, St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church, Richmond, Virginia.
Photograph: Michel M. Raguin

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Tiffany Studios: Jefferson Davis (allusion to the trials of St. Paul)
Stylistically, the opalescent window of Jefferson Davis by the Tiffany Studios forms a sharp
Photograph: Michel M. Raguincontrast. Of an arguably greater cost, the window apparently waited until a ladies’ committee raised the funds in 1896. The subject is St. Paul before Herod Agrippa, taken from the lengthy story in the Acts of the Apostles 23:12–26, of the plot by the Jews against Paul’s life. Paul subsequently flees Jerusalem, is apprehended in Caesarea, imprisoned for two years and brought before a series of magistrates until finally he is judged by Herod Agrippa. The inscription “This man doeth nothing worthy of death or bonds” (Acts 26:31) is Herod’s pronouncement of his belief in Paul’s innocence. Clearly the reference is to Davis’s apprehension and imprisonment after the defeat of the Confederacy. Davis was incarcerated for two years before the government decided that proceeding with charges of treason was impractical.
Frederick Wilson’s design is indebted to the widely circulated image, Christ before Pilate executed by Mihaly Munkacsy (1844-1900) of 1881. Indeed, the image of Paul before Herod Agrippa is quite similar to many Tiffany Studios’ windows depicting Christ before Pilate. Paul stands in profile on the left, and to the right the enthroned Herod Agrippa listens intently, his hand on his chin. A crowd of onlookers is seen through the archway. Some have ventured to see in the lean features and short slanting beard of Paul the face of Jefferson Davis. The upper window, in contrast, is
Photo: Michel M. Raguincompletely celestial; two of Wilson’s characteristic angels display particularly well-fabricated handling of drapery glass and enamel flesh paint. The inscription reads: “Let me be weighed in an even balance that God may know mine integrity” taken from Job 31:6. (The citation of measuring is sometimes translated as “accurate scales.”) Such a reference to Job confirms beyond a doubt the implication that Davis suffered unjustly. We are familiar with the phrase, “the patience of Job,” in refererence to Job being accused by his neighbors and even his wife that his misfortunes were deserved, the result of the errors of his life. In response, Job consistently maintained that he had honored God’s laws. Thus, Davis is presented as a model of integrity and patience.

http://college.holycross.edu/RaguinStainedGlassInAmerica/Memorial/Memorial.html
 

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I found another Stained Glass Windows to Sally Tompkins

“In the 1880s to 1910, many hospitals in Europe had stained glass windows, especially in their entrance halls, lobbies and their chapels,” says Chicago art historian Rolf Achilles. Hospitals here took their inspiration from their European counterparts. There are marvelous windows at hospitals associated with Catholic orders in the Midwest, he says, including the Ryan Chapel atop Presence Saint Joseph Hospital in Chicago, another at HSHS St. Mary's Hospital in Streator, Ill., and the Mother Cabrini shrine, a Chicago chapel associated with the defunct Columbus Hospital.
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Capt. Sally Louisa Tompkins

Sally Louisa Tompkins was born November 9, 1833 at Poplar Grove in Mathews County, Virginia. She was the youngest child of Christopher Tompkins (1778-1838) and his second wife Mariah Booth Patterson Tompkins (1794-1854). She resided at Poplar Grove until the property was sold circa 1848-49, and relocated to Norfolk, Virginia where she studied at the Norfolk Female Institute. By 1854, the same year her mother died, Sally relocated to Richmond, Virginia.

She opened Robertson Hospital in the home of Judge John Robertson at 3rd and Main Street in Richmond soon after the first battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861. Soon after Sally opened her hospital, Surgeon General Samuel P. Moore decided that large military hospitals that would be operated by commissioned officers should replace the many private hospitals since they did not necessarily provide their patients with sufficient care. When Jefferson Davis realized that Robertson Hospital had the highest number of former patients returning to duty, he commissioned her a captain on September 9, 1861 to keep her hospital open. She refused payment for her service and wrote on her military commission "I accepted the above commission as Captain in the CSA. when it was offered. But, I would not allow my name to be placed upon the pay roll of the army." Sally Tompkins became the first woman to be commissioned by the Confederacy. Robertson Hospital remained open until June 1865, when the last of the patients were discharged.

For over a decade following the war, Sally continued to reside in Richmond and was an active member of St. James's Episcopal Church. The 1880s found Sally residing at Riverview in Port Royal, Virginia, the home of John Lightfoot and Harriet Field Lightfoot. Sally purchased the property in November 1896 and owned it until 1905. She spent the last eleven years of her life in Richmond at the Home for Needy Confederate Women. Sally Louisa Tompkins died on July 25, 1916 and was buried with military honors at Kingston Episcopal Parish Church cemetery in Mathews County, Virginia.

https://www.mathewscountyhistoricalsociety.org/sally-louisa-tompkins.html
 

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A Rhett Butler Stained Glass window...???

This stained glass window was dedicated to George Alfred Trenholm, a Charleston shipping magnate who was Margaret Mitchell’s inspiration for the character of Rhett Butler in her novel “Gone with the Wind.”

Tucked into a quiet corner of MUSC’s campus, St. Luke’s Chapel offers students, faculty, staff and patients a brief respite from the bustle of classes or the constant stress of the medical center.

http://academicdepartments.musc.edu/catalyst/archives/2015/10-16StLukes.html
 
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Alexander Campbell clergy... He was known more for the Restoration movement in the early 19th century... I could not find a the bigger window it belongs to... or where...

Both Alexander Campbell and Barton W. Stone were active in educating and freeing their slaves, as well as advocating the repatriation of slaves to Africa. Barton W. Stone's influence helped to foster racially integrated congregations among the poor frontiers people (until the congregations became richer in the 1920s).

When the Quakers were calling for the abolition of slavery,Thomas and Alexander Campbell also opposed slavery (1830-1860). Having owned a few slaves, they educated them and gradually freed them. They spoke out and wrote against slavery, especially the abuses of slavery. But the Restoration Movement split in 1864 between the north and the south, the north becoming the Christian Church, and the south becoming the Churches of Christ, terrified of the freed black man, they espoused the Lost Cause.


Link: http://ex-churchofchrist.com/race.htm


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Alexander Campbell (12 September 1788 – 4 March 1866) was a Scots-Irish immigrant who became an ordained minister in the United States and joined his father Thomas Campbell as a leader of a reform effort that is historically known as the Restoration Movement, and by some as the "Stone-Campbell Movement." It resulted in the development of non-denominational Christian churches, which stressed reliance on scripture and few essentials.[
 

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Iowa stained Glass window... all wars up until 1929...

https://germansiniowa.com/imagegallery/vmb-window-2/

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Grant Wood, Veterans Memorial Window, 1929. The bid to fabricate the glass for Wood’s ambitious window was awarded to the Emil Frei art glass company in St. Louis. However, due to the intricate detail of Wood’s design, the glass ultimately had to be manufactured in Munich, Germany. Wood traveled to Munich to supervise production; while there, he encountered the work of late medieval artists, eventually producing his best-known painting, American Gothic, as a result. However, the Daughters of American Revolution accused Wood of being unpatriotic for allowing a German firm to manufacture materials for a U.S. veterans memorial so soon after World War I. Due to the controversy, the work was not dedicated publicly until its restoration was completed in 2010 following the flooding of 2008. Image courtesy of the Veterans Memorial Commission, Cedar Rapids.

Grant Wood, Veterans Memorial Window, 1929. The bid to fabricate the glass for Wood’s ambitious window was awarded to the Emil Frei art glass company in St. Louis. However, due to the intricate detail of Wood’s design, the glass ultimately had to be manufactured in Munich, Germany. Wood traveled to Munich to supervise production; while there, he encountered the work of late medieval artists, eventually producing his best-known painting, American Gothic, as a result. However, the Daughters of American Revolution accused Wood of being unpatriotic for allowing a German firm to manufacture materials for a U.S. veterans memorial so soon after World War I. Due to the controversy, the work was not dedicated publicly until its restoration was completed in 2010 following the flooding of 2008. Image courtesy of the Veterans Memorial Commission, Cedar Rapids.
 

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Dr. Edward Beecher one of the Beecher clan....

https://gailmasinda.com/category/music-in-worship/

Henry Ward Beecher was part of an outspoken family well-known for their abolitionist views and advocacy of social reform. A sister, Harriet Beecher Stowe, wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin. A brother, Edward Beecher, was also a preacher. Dr. Edward Beecher was the first pastor of First Congregational Church in Galesburg, Illinois, a town active in the Underground Railroad. The First Congregational Church was the first brick church built in Galesburg, and quickly became known simply as “the Brick Church” and much later as “Beecher Chapel.”

Central Congregational Church, Galesburg, Illinois, a memorial to Dr. Edward Beecher
beecher4.jpg
 

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Here is a newer window celebrating Lucretia Mott and Harriet Beecher Stowe abolitionist women... with Joan of Arc?

The representation of such women as Joan of Arc is noted in Panel #14 aptly named the Liberators, fulfilling a public need for saintly heroines. Joan of Arc is curiously positioned between American activists Lucretia Mott and Harriet Beecher Stowe, women whose abandonment of conventional female roles is in less tension with the Proverbs’ demand on women as wives and mothers since the Liberators mission was socially acceptable. Other Liberators titled as the Suffrage Workers can be viewed in Panel #15.

Building: Christ Church Cranbrook
City: Bloomfield Hills
State: Michigan


17-85-9AE-134-94.0158-N150-14Liberators.jpg


It is part of a large stained glass window celebrating famous women of history up until 1929 so there are few civil war women in the large stained glass window... take a look at through the link below...

http://www.michiganstainedglass.org/collections/window.php?id=17-81-33
 

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Red Cross made a Stained Glass Windows: 3 panels...

https://www.redcross.org/about-us/who-we-are/history/tiffany-windows.html

Mabel T. Boardman, a prominent early 20th-century leader and secretary of the American Red Cross for many years, suggested the idea for the windows to the Women’s Relief Corps of the North and the United Daughters of the Confederacy, two organizations of Civil War women. Each organization contributed $5,000 and the three windows were created for a total of $10,000. The contributions of these two organizations confirmed the dedication of the building “In Memory of the Heroic Women of the Civil War.”

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Left Panel
The Women's Relief Corps of the North donated the left panel. Miss Boardman stated that it was inspired by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem, Santa Filomena, that glorified the work of Florence Nightingale: “A lady with a lamp shall stand in the great history of the land, a noble type of good, heroic womanhood.” Louis Comfort Tiffany’s St. Filomena, noted for her healing powers, is surrounded by attendant maidens who provide love and compassion. One carries a shield emblazoned with the Red Cross emblem. She is followed by Hope, carrying a banner with an anchor on painted on it. By her side is Mercy, bearing gifts. Next is Faith, who carries a torch and palm fronds and Charity who offers a healing drink. In the foreground, a mother holds her child, who has gathered flowers, while in the background, a maiden carries the Red Cross banner.

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Center Panel
The central panel was a gift of both organizations. The panel portrays an army of gallant knights in armor, carrying spears, and mounted on horses as they head into battle. The central figure carries a large flag with the Red Cross emblem in the center. He rides a white steed bedecked with a jeweled saddle and bridle. These “Tiffany Jewels" are colored glass stones that are embedded in the windows. Near the feet of the trotting horse lies a fallen warrior who is receiving food and aid from a faithful comrade. The window expresses that even in the middle of battle, there is still a time and a place for humanitarian behavior.

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Right Panel
The right panel was given by the United Daughters of the Confederacy. According to Miss Boardman, a great friend of the American Red Cross, Nobel Peace Prize winner Elihu Root suggested the theme for this window. It depicts Una, wife of the Red Cross knight in Edmund Spenser’s highly allegorical epic, The Faerie Queen. The story depicts proper human behavior. Una represents Truth. She is the graceful central figure in the panel with an abundance of good deeds (flowers) overflowing her apron. Maidens accompany her. One carries a cross and another a lamp of wisdom. Behind her is a banner with a heart, symbolizing love. Other women carry Red Cross banners. A young woman kneels in front of Una holding a shield with the Red Cross emblem on it. The shield inspired the design of the Tiffany award, the highest recognition that an American Red Cross staff member can receive.



 

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