Ami's SOA Stained Glass Windows of the Civil War...

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5fish

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The New England Civil War Museum was originally established by veterans of the local Grand Army of the Republic Post in 1896 who sought "to perpetuate the memory of its dead for all time." The museum now housed in their original, intact meeting hall is the only one of its kind in Connecticut.




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TracyM61

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Las Vegas, Nevada
Absolutely gorgeous. There's something about stained-glass windows that portray beauty and color like no other artistic medium. Perhaps, it has something to do with the light, I don't know. They always remind me of church...
 
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5fish

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Here one with a story...

https://germansons.tumblr.com/post/105813779060/civil-war-dispatches-vicksburg-sniper


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In 1902, the members of Post #522 donated a beautiful stained glass window of patriotic design to the new Corydon Methodist Episcopal Church, the second of three churches built in 1859 on the east side of the Corydon Public Square, replacing the first built in 1826.
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The image above, produced sometime between 1902 and 1924, shows the window in place, centered to the left of the entrance. When this building was razed in 1924, the window was salvaged and installed in the building that stands on the site today. At that time, two additional stained glass windows were donated by the congregation members, with support from the G. A. R. post
 

5fish

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Look here... This guy gets a window and a wiki page...

wiki>>>
Guy Hulett Watkins was a lawyer and U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel during the American Civil War. He was born in Towanda, Pennsylvania, and completed his education at a seminary in Lima, New York. Thereafter, he entered the law practice of his father, William Watkins. He was admitted to the bar on September 9, 1853. In 1859, he was elected district attorney. He had not finished his term at the time of his entrance into the Union Army. He was killed during the Siege of Petersburg, Virginia on or about June 19, 1864.


Home | Silas Gore Camp #141
Silas Gore Camp #141


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5fish

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Here is a church with a few windows... more windows then the ones I posted... link to it...

http://www.tcpoc.org/the-windows.html

Roliston Woodbury attended Bowdoin College but suspended his studies at the commencement of the great Civil War in order to enlist in the Fifth Maine Battery. It was recorded that he was "slightly" wounded at Gettysburg. He served until the end of the war. Instead of returning to Bowdoin he went to the Normal School in Farmington, Maine where, after graduation, he was retained as an instructor, later to become the assistant principal. In 1878 he was chosen principal of the State Normal School in Castine and continued to serve in that capacity until his untimely death in 1888. He was considered to possess "superabundant qualifications" as an educator, school director, and one of the most efficient preparatory teachers in the state. Bowdoin College conferred upon him the honorary degree of Master of Arts. In politics he acted with the Republican Party. Mr. Woodbury was a member of this church and actively interested in religious work. He was married to Nellie Lovejoy of Albany, Maine. After her death he remarried Maria Billings of Fayette, Maine. He had three sons.


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Alfred E. Ives, husband of Harriet P. Ives, was installed as minister by the Council on June 20, 1855. He was paid $800 per year. Over eighty new members joined the church in the twenty plus years he was here. He was pastor until 1878.

Rev. Ives liked poetry. He preferred John Greenleaf Whittier's poems over those of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He founded the Historical Society No. 2 in 1878. (Of the Historical Society No. 1, formed in 1865, there are no records). Ives was the president of the Society, and their one important objective was the uncovering of the old French Fort (Pentegoet) which yielded numerous relics and important information. The Sunday after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated, Rev. Ives gave a sermon entitled "Victory turned into Morning: A Discourse on the Occasion of the Death of Abraham Lincoln, late president of the United States." It was well received, and published into a book. The sermon gives us an insight into the mind and heart of this church and the community after the Civil War. Rev. Ives' house still stands on the common above the Witherle Library and next to the Adams Schoo
l.

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Margaret Perkins Brooks was born in 1790. Her parents, Joseph and Phebe, were considered wealthy for the time and had a large house on upper Main Street. Margaret was 24 when the British occupied Castine in the winter of 1814 -15. She married Captain Barker Brooks of Massachusetts a year or so later. He established a shipyard in Camden in 1806 and probably had a business in Castine at that time as well. they had eight children. Margaret died when their son Noah, the youngest, was seven. Their house is still on the common in Castine, at the top next to the Adams School, and is referred to as the Gardner house. Noah became a famous writer. He published stories about growing up in Castine, among his other fine works. Noah became a close acquaintance of Abraham Lincoln, and was a frequent visitor to the White House.
 

5fish

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This is from a church in a cemetery built in memory of Civil War...

The Civil War Memorial Chapel located in Glendale Cemetery is one of the premier Civil War memorials within the State of Ohio and throughout the United States.

Link to the history of the Chapel... http://www.glendaleakron.com/memorial-chapel

This is inside the chapel and then close up photos of the big murals
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5fish

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Beautiful windows. Love stained glass. We have several from old churches they were tearing down in Louisville, Ky. My husband framed them and we hang on wall.
Beautiful!
Thank you so much~
Gorgeous works of art!!!
@donna mention in her one post about the old buildings being torn down and these windows being lost. Thinks of all the civil war stained glass memorials lost to the wreaking ball...

Like the one below, it was saved but it came from an old church being torn. I bet the history behind that window has been lost. Like, who made it and who contracted for it and why. I have noticed the idea of stained glass windows as memorials caught on in the Union areas but not down in the Southern areas. I have only found a few Southern ones so far...


The Innkeepers of the Fountain Chateau Bed and Breakfast explained to Red that no stay would be complete without a visit to the Burr Oak Winery in nearby New Lisbon, Wisconsin. Owner, Steve Kennedy, while stationed in Germany, really liked the architecture. He wanted the winery to be made of real stone, wood and glass. This winery features eleven stained glass windows from a local church built in 1882, one of those windows was given to the church in memory of church members serving in the Civil War. Burr Oak opened in 1997 and definitely worth the stop!
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5fish

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I found this video of this chapel at Northwestern that covers American history in Stained Glass windows from WWone back to the Viking...

Here is another clip from our trip to the headquarters of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity the Levere Memorial Chapel on the campus of Northwestern University in Evanston Il. The Peace Chapel serves as a memorial to those members who have served in America's armed forces. It contains a magnificent collection of stained glass panels.



In this clip, we look at the ones that line the upper balcony/passageway which is only about five feet wide which is why it seems we're right on top of the panels.
We have posted a couple of other clips from this magnificent space.

https://youtu.be/3d-EgjqpEVg
https://youtu.be/IfESU8Crvu8
https://youtu.be/60Lp2jVtn04
 

5fish

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Leonidas Polk has his own windows on Sewanee campus...

https://thesewaneepurple.org/2018/02/26/sewanee-slavery-project-holds-fourth-public-forum-on-art-and-commemoration-of-the-university/

One window depicts a scene of Leonidas Polk writing a letter; this depiction invokes imagery from the infamous “Sword over Gown” portrait of Polk, which formerly hung in Convocation and has since moved to the University Archives, as covered by The Purple two years ago. The sword resting beside the desk shows Polk’s participation in the Civil War.

The narthex windows also contain the seal of the Confederacy and its placement above the national flag carries its own implications of current ties. For further evidence, MacLaren located a few news articles concerning Sewanee’s Centennial celebration, which proudly boast headlines such as “Sewanee’s Purpose not changed in 100 years” and “University of the South’s History to Repeat.”

MacLaren then discussed the historical inaccuracy of multiple windows and the dangerous “reality effect” they pose in rewriting history. First, the destruction of the Cornerstone, which was cited as being chosen simply for “its dramatic effect.” The scene itself is also politically charged in its representation of cowardly and destructive Union soldiers juxtaposed with the peaceful and benevolent procession of religious Confederates in the image directly beneath.


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