Ami's SOA Stained Glass Windows of the Civil War...


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
Sally Tompkins, Southern nurse...


Civil War Nurse and Hospital Administrator Captain Sally Tompkins was a Civil War nurse, humanitarian and philanthropist who founded a Confederate hospital in Richmond, Virginia. During the war, she cared for 1,333 Confederate soldiers in her hospital with only 73 deaths - the lowest mortality rate of any military hospital - establishing the remarkable record of returning 94% of them to service.
sallytompkins272x400.jpg


Here is a link to her...

https://www.civilwarwomenblog.com/sally-tompkins/
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
More about the window at UA... on post 43

For instance, consider that, in 1925, the Alabama Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy commissioned Tiffany Studios in New York to create a stained glass window to honor and memorialize the glory of the Civil War-era cadets of the University of Alabama.

https://religion.ua.edu/blog/2015/07/16/the-effects-of-stained-glass/

Photo courtesy of Cool At Hoole, 2010
Listen
Installed 60 years after the burning of The University of Alabama's campus on April 4, 1865, the UDC Memorial Window was designed by Tiffany Studios in New York in 1925 and commissioned by the Alabama Division of The United Daughters of the Confederacy a year later. The window itself boasts various types of construction techniques and glass including: painting glass, plating, drapery glass, mottled glass and confetti glass. Inscribed on the window is "Dulce et decorum est pro patria moi," which translates to "It is sweet and noble to die for one's country. It also has an inscription that reads, "As crusaders of old, they fought their heritage to save." The window, representing the Lost Cause, showcases Confederate battle flags and imagery of cotton. The overall cost of the stained glass window was $5,000. However, Tiffany Studios gave the U.D.C. a $1,700 discount on the piece.
The dedication of the "Christian Knight" represented the climax of the "Lost Cause" in Alabama. The ceremony took place in front of where the window was showcased, Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, which is now known as Carmichael Hall. The dedication drew an audience consisting of members of the university community, Tuscaloosa patrons, Officers of the U.D.C. and seven of the Confederate veterans that were University of Alabama cadets on campus in April 1865. B.B. Comer, former governor and UA cadet, gave a speech. The crowd sang songs such as "The Bonnie Blue Flag" and "Dixie," after which "They leapt gallantly to their tottering feet and the old, wild rebel yell rose lustily, terribly from their feeble throats."[1]
In 1939, the U.D.C. Memorial Window was taken down and relocated to the new Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library where it was until 1993, when the stained glass knight was relocated to the William Stanley Hoole Special Collections Library located in Mary Harmon Bryant Hall.

https://www.theclio.com/web/entry?id=21471
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
Here is one recounting the slave's experience...

The stained glass windows of a church in the Third Ward recount the emancipation of Houston's slaves. A union general appeared in Houston (pictured above) after the fall of the Confederacy in 1865 to proclaim release for all slaves. Houston's African Americans were soon forced into ghettos like the Third Ward by Jim Crow and other Segregationist laws.


HoustonEmancipation.jpg
 

Patrick H

Lt. Colonel
Joined
Mar 7, 2014
Messages
10,269
Thank you for this thread. I was aware of similar windows commemorating WWII incidents in Europe, but I confess my ignorance about these Civil War windows right here in the States. They are wonderful, and they represent many different artistic styles, too. Please keep the examples coming. I love seeing these!
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
Here is a civil war naval action...

ilitary-stained-glass-adm-farragut-civial-war-battle-of-mobile-bay-1867-us-navel-academy-low-res.jpg

Title: Adm. Farragut, Civil War Battle of Mobile Bay, c1867. Order No.: A1-1185. Location: US Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD.
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
Here is General Grant... read the quote on the window...

Stained Glass Window at Methodist Church in Laurel, OH.


a09951a1b54e097db97b86c4f3a5723e.jpg
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
President Grant's and Longfellow's

Stained Glass Window

President Grant
grant.jpg

The window is just above the front desk. It is by Alfred Godwin and Company, Philadelphia. It was dedicated in 1886.

Longfellow
longf.jpg

Longfellow is opposite. The window depicts a sea-burial scene from Longfellow's poem Tegner's Drapa. This Tiffany window was designed by Theodore Russell Davis.

lib2.jpg

The Asbury Park Pubic Library with the corner turret and before the Ivy. The Grant window is at left on the Grand Avenue side. Turrets are marvelous things. I'd like to live in one.

https://noweverthen.com/asbury/ap2fold/grant.html
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
At West Point. Hold story is in the link;
Willet Hauser's stained glass window commission remains the longest, continuous relationship and dedication to The United States Military Academy at West Point in American history thus far.
For over 66 years, Willet Hauser has devoted time and perseverance to create and maintain the stained glass windows at The United States Military Academy at West Point's Cadet’s Chapel.


http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/07/prweb12031346.htm

west%20point.jpg


Another window of the Indian wars..

stain-windz.jpg
 
Last edited:

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
Here is one of Lincoln's mom!

The smaller window, created by Brenda Belfield, only appears small – it is actually seven-and-a-half feet tall. It depicts Lincoln's mother, Nancy Hanks .

BelfieldWindow.jpg


The smaller window, created by Brenda Belfield, only appears small – it is actually seven-and-a-half feet tall. It depicts Lincoln’s mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln. Her face is in shadow, suggesting tragic events to come. She holds a Bible, symbolic of her intellectual nature. Below her hands are small white flowers of the poisonous snake root plant, which caused the death of Nancy Hanks Lincoln, her parents, and many other early settlers. When cows ate the plant, those who drank the cow’s milk were poisoned – the condition was known as milk poisoning.
The woman at the bottom of the window is Lincoln’s step-mother, Sarah Bush Lincoln. Her hand rests on young Lincoln’s shoulder, symbolizing her gentle and affectionate nature.

Here is a link to the rest of the story...
http://www.brightpathtours.com/WordPress/2017/02/the-lincolns-of-washington-dc-part-iii/
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
This is one of the first Churches to honor Lincoln...

http://saintstanislauspncc.org/index.php/about/stained-glass/

Provided is a brief description of the stained glass windows in the Polish National Catholic Cathedral of St. Stanislaus, Bishop & Martyr, Scranton, PA.

As the observer continues up the aisle he will see the Abraham Lincoln window. St. Stanislaus was perhaps the first Church in the country to honor President Lincoln. This immortal emancipator of the black man, whose name shines like a bright star among the names of the greatest men of all humankind, was enshrined in the Cathedral Church to remind us of our duties and obligations to all- No matter what their creed or the color of their skins. Who has not heard of Lincoln?

By his life and work, he reminded the people that all reform begins in the human heart. He must have understood Christ very well, for this was Christ’s answer to the tempter as He began His mission of Salvation.


20150907_124521-e1445291835115.jpg
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
Here another Lincoln in Pittsburg...

http://davebartruff.com/2014/pittsburgh-prays

Just a few blocks away I enter Smithfield United Church. Its unique aluminum spire is illuminated throughout the night.

The church, designed for its German Evangelical Protestant congregation, was acquired and built on land donated by the heirs of William Penn in 1787.

Smithfield is also the oldest organized church in the city. Its gorgeous Rose Window at the front of the sanctuary is a breathtaking 19 feet in diameter. Other outstanding windows depict the three Biblical aspects of Faith, Hope and Love in the narthex.

Twelve tall double windows enlighten the house of worship itself, six on either side occupying over 60 per cent of the sanctuary’s walls. The upper portion of each window illustrates the life and teachings of Jesus; the lower portion, the people and places of the church’s German Protestant heritage such as Martin Luther at Wittenberg during the 16th Century Reformation and Abraham Lincoln at Pittsburgh in 1861.


Lincoln-Window.jpg


Lincoln window, Smithfield United Church of Christ
 

5fish

Captain
Joined
Aug 26, 2007
Messages
7,254
Location
Central Florida
A window honoring the story behind TAPS...

The first sounding of Taps at a military funeral is commemorated in a stained-glass window at the Chapel of the Centurion (The Old Post Chapel) at Fort Monroe, Virginia. The window, designed by Colonel Eugene Jacob and made by R. Geissler of New York, is based on a painting by Sidney King. The window was dedicated in 1958 and depicts a bugler and a flag at half staff. In the painting, a drummer boy stands beside the bugler. The grandson of that drummer boy purchased Berkeley Plantation, where Harrison’s Landing is located.

2012-08-11-09.59.56.jpg


Here is the start of the story...

The first use of Taps at a funeral occurred in 1862 during the Peninsular Campaign in Virginia. Usually, three volleys were fired during a military burial service. This practice originated in the old custom of halting the fighting to remove the dead from the battlefield. Once each army had cleared its dead, it would fire three volleys to indicate that deceased soldiers had been cared for and that the army was ready to resume the fight. The tradition of firing the three volleys at funerals was noted in regulations and manuals. (In modern-day ceremonies, the fact that the firing party consists of seven riflemen firing three volleys does not constitute a twenty-one gun salute; that is only rendered by cannon firing twenty-one times.)

During the Peninsular Campaign, Captain John C. Tidball of Battery A, Second Artillery, lost a cannoneer who was killed in action. This soldier then needed to be buried at a time when the battery occupied an advanced position, concealed in the woods. Since the enemy was close, Tidball realized that it was unsafe to fire the customary volleys over the grave. He worried that the volleys would renew fighting. It occurred to Captain Tidball that the sounding of Taps would be the most appropriate ceremony to use as a substitute. He ordered it to be sounded during the burial. The practice, thus originated, was taken up throughout the Army of the Potomac, and finally confirmed by orders (Colonel James A. Moss’s Officer’s Manual, published by George Banta Publishing Co., Menasha, Wisconsin, 1913). Moss also writes that the sounding of Taps may have been inaugurated at West Point about 1840, and it may also have been sounded by certain regiments during the Mexican War. He could be referring to the use of the 1835 or Scott’s Tattoo call.


Finnish the story here and see the monument built to TAPS honoring place and moment...

http://tapsbugler.com/daniel-adams-butterfield/
 

Viper21

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
2,449
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
Here is one with Stonewall Jackson's last words.... in a Black Church..

A story I did not know of Jackson...

The interesting thing is that Jackson in his own time was known for being rather friendly to Black people. In defiance of state law, he started a Colored Sunday School Lexington in 1855 and taught slaves to read and supported it financially even while away in combat. Many of his former students went on to found Black churches and schools. The first donation for the statue for his grave came from Lexington's Negro Baptist Church and in the Black Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church of Roanoke, Virginia, is a stained glass memorial to Jackson, the founding pastor having been a member of Jackson's class.

http://www.natemaas.com/2011/01/thomas-jonathan-stonewall-jackson.html


manassas+082b.jpg
More on this window:

FIFTH AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, is located at 301 Patton Ave. nw, Roanoke, Virginia. The street was Fifth Ave. before many streets were renamed many years ago. It is an Afro-American church with a stained glass window behind the pulpit that is a memorial to General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, and depicts "Let us Cross the River and Rest in the Shade of the Trees."

In 1905, Rev. L.L. Downing (1863-1937), the pastor of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, had this window installed because Thomas J. Jackson taught the Reverend Downing’s parents to read and write and instructed them in the ways of the Presbyterian Church. Thomas J. Jackson was a VMI professor in Lexington, Virginia before the Civil War, and was a staunch Presbyterian.

Dr. Lylburn O. Downing, a son of the Reverend Downing and a 1912 graduate of Howard University Medical School, practiced medicine in Roanoke. The dedication on July 21, 1905 was attended by a vast crowd of white and black Roanokers. In his speech that day, Rev. Downey counseled the Negros (the term used at that period), "to be as chivalrous and honest as you were in the days of slavery and to uplift yourselves. Those who want to get ahead, will find the white man his best friend. There is no reason why the races cannot work in harmony."

When the wooden church burned in 1950s, the window was not damaged, and a brick church was erected on the site. The "Jackson Window" was again installed behind the pulpit. Much of the financial help to rebuild the church came from white friends and business leaders in the City.


http://roanokecwrt.com/Fifth Presbyterian.html
 

Viper21

Sergeant Major
Joined
Jul 4, 2016
Messages
2,449
Location
Rockbridge County, Virginia
More on this window:

FIFTH AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, is located at 301 Patton Ave. nw, Roanoke, Virginia. The street was Fifth Ave. before many streets were renamed many years ago. It is an Afro-American church with a stained glass window behind the pulpit that is a memorial to General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, and depicts "Let us Cross the River and Rest in the Shade of the Trees."

In 1905, Rev. L.L. Downing (1863-1937), the pastor of the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, had this window installed because Thomas J. Jackson taught the Reverend Downing’s parents to read and write and instructed them in the ways of the Presbyterian Church. Thomas J. Jackson was a VMI professor in Lexington, Virginia before the Civil War, and was a staunch Presbyterian.

Dr. Lylburn O. Downing, a son of the Reverend Downing and a 1912 graduate of Howard University Medical School, practiced medicine in Roanoke. The dedication on July 21, 1905 was attended by a vast crowd of white and black Roanokers. In his speech that day, Rev. Downey counseled the Negros (the term used at that period), "to be as chivalrous and honest as you were in the days of slavery and to uplift yourselves. Those who want to get ahead, will find the white man his best friend. There is no reason why the races cannot work in harmony."

When the wooden church burned in 1950s, the window was not damaged, and a brick church was erected on the site. The "Jackson Window" was again installed behind the pulpit. Much of the financial help to rebuild the church came from white friends and business leaders in the City.


http://roanokecwrt.com/Fifth Presbyterian.html
Check this out...

 


Fewer ads. Lots of American Civil War content!
JOIN NOW: REGISTER HERE!
Top