Ami's SOA Stained Glass Windows of the Civil War...


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#23
I bet. I could most likely post at least one civil war stained glass window a day for a year... It looks like someone from Iowa had my idea already... if you click on the links you will see why...

This is in Iowa... http://www.iowacivilwarmonuments.com/cgi-bin/gaarddetails.pl?1212008257~2

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Another one from Iowa .... http://www.iowacivilwarmonuments.com/cgi-bin/gaarddetails.pl?1210269059~2

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Iowa... http://www.iowacivilwarmonuments.com/cgi-bin/gaarddetails.pl?1406308610~2


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http://www.iowacivilwarmonuments.com/cgi-bin/gaarddetails.pl?1370455544~2


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#25
The earlier Bobby Lee post well that is a massive stained glass display at Georgia State ...

http://sites.gsu.edu/areid29/tag/rhodes-hall/

This is, in my opinion, the most fascinating part of the entire mansion. These three painted-glass window panels were installed to depict the rise and fall of the Confederacy. There was a lot of southern nationalism around this time in history as the southern surrender was approaching its 40th anniversary and several Confederate generals died right around this time. The first panel depicts the inauguration of Confederate president Jefferson Davis above and the Battle of Fort Sumter below. The second panel shows the Confederate victory at the First Battle of Manassas with “Stonewall” Jackson earning his nickname. Finally, the third panel depicts Confederate General Robert E. Lee saying goodbye to his soldiers right before departing to go sign the terms of surrender at Appomattox Courthouse. The level of detail of these fixtures is absolutely incredible; you can get up close and see the individual soldiers and details of their faces and uniforms. All three windows are divided by portraits of over a dozen important Confederate figures.

Finally, this last window kind of put into perspective the mindset of the architect and of Amos Giles Rhodes when this house was being designed. This window is in a small closet below the staircase and the rest of the windows and was supposed to be symbolic of taking down the Confederate Flag and storing it away in order to let go of the past while still honoring the sense of southern heritage that many southerners then and now associate with the Confederacy.


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bdtex

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#26
Stained glass window commemorating David Owen Dodd,a 17 year old convicted and hung as a spy on January 8,1864 in Little Rock, Arkansas. It is currently on display at MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History in Little Rock.

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#27
Here is one with Stonewall Jackson's last words.... in a Black Church..

A story I did not know of Jackson...

The interesting thing is that Jackson in his own time was known for being rather friendly to Black people. In defiance of state law, he started a Colored Sunday School Lexington in 1855 and taught slaves to read and supported it financially even while away in combat. Many of his former students went on to found Black churches and schools. The first donation for the statue for his grave came from Lexington's Negro Baptist Church and in the Black Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church of Roanoke, Virginia, is a stained glass memorial to Jackson, the founding pastor having been a member of Jackson's class.

http://www.natemaas.com/2011/01/thomas-jonathan-stonewall-jackson.html


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#29
Here is a church used by soldiers during the battle of Franklin and lost its stained glass windows. The new windows were designed and installed by the famous by Louis Comfort Tiffany, none of the windows have a civil war theme.

St. Paul’s Episcopal Church is located in the heart of downtown Franklin
. It was the first Episcopal Church established in Tennessee. St. Paul’s was founded in 1827 by the Rev, James Hervey Otey who would later become the first Episcopal Bishop of Tennessee.

During the Civil War it was used for barracks by Union troops. Many of the pews were burned for firewood. Following the Battle of Franklin (November 30th, 1864), St. Paul’s was used as a field hospital. Some of those who died in the church were buried nearby at McGavock Confederate Cemetery.

It was heavily damaged during the Civil War (1861 – 1865) and when it was restored eight stained-glass windows were installed designed by Louis Comfort Tiffany. Here is a photo gallery of the windows shot from the inside.

A link: https://battleoffranklin.wordpress.com/2007/08/08/st_pauls/

Some of the windows...

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You will have to click on the link to see the rest...
 
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#34
These are from another thread... women in the civil war...

https://civilwartalk.com/threads/civil-war-women-monuments.115120/page-2


Butler, Ohio - Butler County Soldiers, Sailors and Pioneers Monument

Dedicated in 1906, the fundraising for the monument started in 1897. It features stained glass windows on either side commemorating women's roles in the Civil War, one with women rolling bandages and another with women nursing wounded soldiers.

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#36
National Cathedral... Here is a link to more of the story and pictures...

http://www.jwdletters.com/2013/07/

Right before the July 4th holiday this year, my wife asked me if I wanted to go to the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. to take the Civil War tour that they were hosting to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the war. Of course, I jumped at the invitation and the opportunity to learn about the role that the cathedral played in Civil War history. Interestingly, the National Cathedral was not started until 1907, so I was curious as to how they were going to link the Civil War to this national shrine that wasn't even started until 42 years after the end of the conflict.

The Civil War tour is conducted by a volunteer who is well versed in both Civil War history as well as cathedral history. She did an excellent job of connecting the cathedral to the events of the war by explaining the connection to Civil War veterans via various reunion ceremonies held there early in the 20th century. The cathedral is resplendent with stained glass images of the history of the nation and reflects the various conflicts, wars, and struggles faced as the country matured. Part of this struggle is the Civil War as indicated in the contrasting of the George Washington Bay and the Abraham Lincoln Bay.....

There are these Stained Glass Windows in George Washington and Lincoln Bays...

Washington...

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In the Washington Bay, at the statute of the first president is on display, along with a beautiful stained glass piece created by the renowned artist Robert Pinart. This piece depicts the birth of the nation with conflict in the middle, but growth and expansion, much like a plant.


Lincoln...

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On the opposite side of the cathedral front is the Lincoln Bay. By contrast it shows the fires, pains and destruction of a nation in a second Pinart glass piece. It too, is flanked by a statue of a great president. The Lincoln Bay was built in the 1970s using monies donated from the estate of Robert Todd Lincoln.


 
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#37
I found this site and this man still makes Stained Glass windows with civil war themes and he will make one for you... I do not know anything about this site or the man making the clams... but if you are interested here:

http://www.joshuasattic.com/stainedglass.htm

Modern Stained Glass Collectibles

Back to Collectibles

Perhaps Stained Glass windows as an art form died out with all the Veterans of the Civil War. Perhaps not. While it was once a great and flourishing industry of artisans and craftsmen, the field now holds very few individuals who can take on much more than a pretty flowered lampshade kit! Quite frankly, it takes a tremendous amount of work and patience to accurately piece together and join a leaded window. There are many steps: creating a design, cutting the pattern pieces, tracing and cutting the glass, grinding each to an exact fit, and leading the whole of it together! Even framing the finished piece seems like too much work!!! But the end results can be breathtaking. And so, once understood and appreciated, stained glass art becomes addictive; particularly in its finer, artist-designed forms.

This beautiful method of expression can certainly be applied to the Civil War. Most modern collectors have had occasion to see those big, bold and beautiful windows from old GAR halls that still come on the market occasionally. Unfortunately, they're not enough GAR halls to go around nowadays! Also, the subject matter of their windows may not always "speak" to us in a personal way. I frankly don't need a window that says "GAR Post 142" in my house. And this is where the creation of modern stained glass collectibles can fill the void : as impressive objects of art that are totally appropriate to the period and complement our nearby collections. Now certainly, very few of us would want an entire door or skylight done in a Civil War motif!!! But, on a smaller scale, free hanging framed panels of roughly one to three feet can dramatically finish off the Collector's showroom. These can be hung by chains in front of an exterior window as people often do with old stained glass windows bought at flea markets. But custom pieces can also be designed to the exact size of someone's bookcases, transoms, or even exterior windows.

These windows are created by Cliff Catania, the owner of Joshua's Attic. It was a hobby that I'd mastered long before I became so intensely interested in the Civil War. But now, it can be applied with a little pomp!!! Two forms of custom stained glass are offered:
a) generic, or "common"scenes, such as cannon, flags, patriotic motifs, in small 1-2 foot sized panes; and
b) the Custom works which can range from any size to any subject. Imagine a hand-to-hand fight around a cannon in stained glass!!!

The Standard "common" scenes can be predicted in price. As time goes on, I will add samples of these pieces to the page below. Custom works must be discussed in advance.

But please be aware, they are for very "motivated" collectors, for as they get larger and more intricate, their cost could become great. None the less, some want the best and work hard to be able to own those things.

Regardless of what size or design one may choose, it's good to know that we're not yet forced to abandon this stunning form of Vintage Expression.
 
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#38
Here is a stained window honoring students that died during our civil war... Wesleyan University's Memorial Chapel,

http://john-banks.blogspot.com/2012/02/faces-of-civil-war-george-h-crosby.html


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A teen-aged soldier's name appears on a beautiful stained-glass window in Wesleyan University's Memorial Chapel, fourth from the top and among the names of 17 other men from the school who died during the Civil War.

Prominently etched in elaborate script in the bottom window panels are these words:


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Bottom panels of stained-glass windows
at the Memorial Chapel at
Wesleyan University in Middletown, Conn.
The chapel was dedicated in 1871.
Alumni and Students Who Died for Our Country
1861 1865.

Inside the chapel on this cold Monday morning, an instructor gently admonishes her student choir. And outside a short time later, a young woman, perhaps 20 years old, stands in front of the beautiful brownstone chapel and points out landmarks on the bucolic Middletown, Conn., campus to a group of prospective students.

It's doubtful any of them know the story of another Wesleyan University student, 19-year-old George Heman Crosby, who died nearly 150 years ago and whose name is etched on that Memorial Chapel stained-glass window.

The son of a ship captain from Middle Haddam, Conn., about 20 miles southeast of Hartford, the 2nd lieutenant in the 14th Connecticut Infantry was mortally wounded at the Battle of Antietam on Sept. 17, 1862, barely a month after he enlisted. Thirty-seven days later, he died at home in Middle Haddam, his parents Heman and Mary likely by his side.

Before he joined the fight for his country, Crosby probably was like many of today's Wesleyan students. Full of promise and hope for the future, he enrolled at the university in the fall of 1861. A very good student, one of his former teachers wrote of the "enthusiasm and spirit of perserverance with which he pursued his studies. He was ever anxious to improve." Crosby, who twice was unsuccessful in obtaining an appointment to West Point, had a keen military mind and joined the Mansfield Guards, a local militia group named after General Joseph Mansfield of Middletown, while he was in college. (1)
 

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