Recreated St. Nick’s Eggnog

Eleanor Rose

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#1

(American Egg Board)

St. Nick’s Eggnog


Eggnog is a delicious holiday tradition, but some folks have a low tolerance for the emulsifiers and stabilizers used in commercial eggnogs. Homemade eggnog has no added ingredients. This recipe has been passed down since 1930. The leftover eggnog can be used in French toast or for pancake batter.

Ingredients:
6 large eggs
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
4 cups whole milk, divided (For richer eggnog, substitute half-and-half or light cream for some of the milk.)
1 tsp. vanilla
Cinnamon sticks for garnish


Directions:
Beat eggs, sugar and salt in large heavy saucepan until blended. Stir in 2 cups milk.

Cook over low heat, stirring constantly but gently, until mixture is just thick enough to just coat a metal spoon with a thin film and temperature reaches 160°F, about 15 minutes. Do not allow to boil. Remove from heat immediately.

Stir in remaining 2 cups milk and vanilla. Refrigerate, covered, until thoroughly chilled, several hours or overnight.

Just before serving, stir brandy, rum or bourbon into the eggnog, if desired.
 

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Eleanor Rose

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#6
Hubby adores eggnog! Gains his extra holiday pounds from eggnog alone!
I usually buy from the store. Have always been afraid to make home made because of the eggs. I'm scared I will not cook it properly.
Low heat, a heavy sauce pan and constant stirring are keys to making good eggnog. Never increase the cooking temperature to try to speed the process along. If you do, the mixture is likely to curdle. Stirring constantly will prevent scorching and ensure that it heats evenly.

Watch the eggnog carefully and test it frequently toward the end of the cooking time, after about 10 to 12 minutes. Undercooked eggnog will be thin and watery and overcooked will curdle. The difference is literally just a few degrees.

If you want perfectly smooth eggnog, pour it through a sieve before chilling it in the refrigerator.

You've got this @AshleyMel! :thumbsup:
 
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#8
An online search will find you easy ways to pasteurize eggs before making eggnog or any egg recipe (such as meringue pies) where you are concerned the eggs may not be sufficiently cooked to kill modern bacteria. A trick learned from my youngest granddaughter, then age 15, who took a high school course in cooking. All you need is a candy thermometer!
 

ucvrelics.com

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#10
During The Christmas Holidays my Grand Mama always made Velvet Hammers. I still make them every year in her memory except I use 151 Rum.

The velvet hammer falls into the creamy mixed drink category alongside popular recipes like the white Russian and mudslide. It's a mix of orange and coffee liqueurs, which is unusual but it works rather well.

This is a drink that's been around for some time, though it no longer has the notoriety of many of its counterparts. It likely came out of the 1970s and 80's when creamy concoctions were all the rage. It's easy to remember because the three ingredients are poured in equal amounts and there's really no mixing required.


If you're looking for a simple drink that's just a little out of the ordinary, this retro recipe is a good choice.

Ingredients
Put all in a blender and let it rip Tater Chip
 

Eleanor Rose

1st Lieutenant
Joined
Nov 26, 2016
Messages
4,681
Location
central NC
#11
During The Christmas Holidays my Grand Mama always made Velvet Hammers. I still make them every year in her memory except I use 151 Rum.

The velvet hammer falls into the creamy mixed drink category alongside popular recipes like the white Russian and mudslide. It's a mix of orange and coffee liqueurs, which is unusual but it works rather well.

This is a drink that's been around for some time, though it no longer has the notoriety of many of its counterparts. It likely came out of the 1970s and 80's when creamy concoctions were all the rage. It's easy to remember because the three ingredients are poured in equal amounts and there's really no mixing required.


If you're looking for a simple drink that's just a little out of the ordinary, this retro recipe is a good choice.

Ingredients
Put all in a blender and let it rip Tater Chip
OMG!!! You had me at 151! Merry Christmas!
 
Joined
Jul 21, 2014
Messages
9,673
#18
During The Christmas Holidays my Grand Mama always made Velvet Hammers. I still make them every year in her memory except I use 151 Rum.

The velvet hammer falls into the creamy mixed drink category alongside popular recipes like the white Russian and mudslide. It's a mix of orange and coffee liqueurs, which is unusual but it works rather well.

This is a drink that's been around for some time, though it no longer has the notoriety of many of its counterparts. It likely came out of the 1970s and 80's when creamy concoctions were all the rage. It's easy to remember because the three ingredients are poured in equal amounts and there's really no mixing required.


If you're looking for a simple drink that's just a little out of the ordinary, this retro recipe is a good choice.

Ingredients
Put all in a blender and let it rip Tater Chip
I hope this is for more than one person. :eek:
 

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