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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
FLORIDA VOLUNTEERS.
1st REGIMENT CAVALRY.

Organized: Various Places 12/62 to 8/64 on 12/1/62
Mustered Out: 11/17/65

FLORIDA VOLUNTEERS.
1st REGIMENT CAVALRY.

Authorized by Gen. Banks October 29, 1863, and on ganized at Barrancas, Fla., December,
1863, to August, 1864. Attached to Pensacola, Fla., District West Florida, Dept. Gulf,
to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, District West Florida, to January, 1865. 3rd Brigade,
District West Florida, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Lucas' Cavalry Division, Steele's
Command, to May, 1865. District of West Florida to November, 1865.

SERVICE.-Duty at Barrancas, Fla., till March, 1865. Expedition from Barrancas toward
Pollard, Ala., July 21-25, 1864. Actions at Camp Gonzales July 22, and near Pollard
July 23. Expedition from Barrancas August 1314. Expedition from Barrancas to Mariana
September 18-October 4. Euche Anna C. H. September 23. Mariana September 27. Vernon
September 28. Expedition up Blackwater Bay October 25-28.. Milton October 26. Expedition
from Barrancas to Pine Barren Creek November 16-17. Pine Barren Creek and Bridge
November 17. Expedition to Pollard, Ala., December 13-19. Bluff Springs and Pollard
December 15. Escanabia Bridge December 15-16. Pine Barren Ford December 17-18.
Expedition from Barrancas to Milton February 22-25, 1865. Milton February 23.
Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 18-April 9. March to Blakely, Ala.,
March 18-31. (Dismounted men remain at Barrancas.) Expedition to Alabama & Florida R. R.
March 18-25. Near Evergreen March 24. Muddy Creek, Ala., March 26. Siege of Fort
Blakely March 31-April 9. Near Blakely April 1. Occupation of Mobile April 12.
March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and in Alabama till May. Ordered to
Barrancas,. Fla., and duty in Western and Middle Florida till November.

Mustered out November 17, 1865.


Frederick A. Dyer "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" vol. 3

Pine Barren Bridge, Fla.,
Nov. 17, 1864.

Detachments of 2nd Maine and 1st Florida Cavalry.

Lieut.-Col. Andrew B. Spurling, with 450 men, while on an
expedition from Barrancas to Pine Barren bridge, captured the
Confederate picket at the bridge, then charged across,
surprised and captured the entire guard, 38 in number, with 47
horses, 3 miles and 75 stands of arms, without firing a shot.


Source: The Union Army,Vol.,6 p.,690

...................................................................................................................................
Second Florida (Union) Cavalry
( 3-years )
Organized: Cedar Keys, Key West, Tortugas on 12/1/63
Mustered Out: 11/29/65




Organized at Cedar Keys and Key West, Fla, Decem ber, 1863, to June, 1864. Attached to
District of Key' West and Tortugas, Dept. of the Gulf, and Dept. of Florida, to November,
1865.

SERVICE.-Duty at Fort Myers, Cedar Keys and in District of Key West till June, 1865.
Skirmishes at Pease Creek, Fla, February 13-14 and February 20, 1864. Attack on Fort
Myers February 20. Affair at Tampa May 6. Operations on West Coast of Florida July 1-31.
Expedition to Bayport July 1-4. Skirmish at Station Four, near Cedar Keys, July 6.
Expedition to St. Andrews Bay July 20-29. Fort Myers August 26. Expedition to Bayport
October 1, and to St. Andrews Bay October 20-29. Near Magnolia October 24. Expedition
to Otter Creek, on Florida R. R., October 30-31. Braddock's Farm, near Welaka,
February 5, 1865. Station Four, near Cedar Keys, February 13. Attack on Fort Myers
February 20. Operations near St. Marks. February 21-March 7. East River Bridge March
4-5 Newport Bridge March 5-6. Natural Bridge March 6. Occupation of Tampa May 27.
Duty in District of Florida till November.

Mustered out November 29 1865.


Frederick A. Dyer "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" vol. 3


**********************************************************************

Reports of Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, Second Florida (Union) Cavalry,
of skirmish near Station No. 4, near Cedar Keys, Fla.

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, July 8, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the commanding
general:

Learning that there was a force concentrating at Station 4, I thought it
best to try and discover in what force, and what their designs might be.

On the morning of the 6th instant, I took out 200 men, and advanced 3
miles beyond Station 4, found the enemy, skirmished with him until I
discovered he had a large force, and then fall back to the bayou. The
men behaved very well; marched back in good order. I remained at the
bayou six hours, it being high water so that I could not cross. They
assaulted us three times with about twice our number, and were
handsomely whipped each time. When the water fell, succeeded in
crossing the bayou and returning to Day Key. Loss, 8 men wounded, 2
dangerously; no loss of arms.

Lieut. Pease and men behaved well. I am much pleased with the
conduct of my regiment.

The rebel force consisted of four companies of infantry, one company
cavalry, and some home guards. Their loss was at least double our own.

Will write particulars by first opportunity.

Respectfully,

EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg.

Capt. MARCELLUS BAILEY,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

-----

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, July 9, 1864.
GEN.: My letter to you was necessarily brief for want of time. I
will now explain my object in advancing up the railroad. I had been
informed by quite a number of professed Union men that there was not
a soldier this side of Baldwin, and that 200 men could go through the
entire State.

Tuesday quite an intelligent negro came in from a place called Sodom,
near Otter Creek. He reported four companies of infantry at Chamber's
plantation (8 miles above Station 4), and a company of cavalry half way
between the two places, and that the cars had commenced running down
as far as Chambers'. From him I also learned that there ware 74 bales
of cotton at Otter Creek. I deemed it advisable to take all the force I
could spare from here and push our as far as Chambers', and if I found
that there was a force, discover its strength, and, if possible, its designs.
If I did not meet with a force, I intended to have pushed on to Otter
Creek, and to have captured the cotton, to have sent it down the river,
and then to have returned.

Lieut. Pease led the advance with 50 men of his company, and had
pushed on to about 3 miles beyond Station 4, where he came upon a
cavalry picket. They discovered him first and immediately sounded the
alarm. I was some distance in the rear. Learning that he had met the
enemy I sent him word to place his men in as good a position as
possible, and to hold the enemy in check until I could come up. When
I arrived he was falling back, being nearly surrounded. I threw my men
behind the bank of the railroad, placing him on the right; the rebels
dismounted and pushed up pretty sharply. I tried to restrain my men
from firing till the enemy would come within short range, but through
the eagerness of the negroes to engage them, the firing commenced
before I gave the order. That rather alarmed them, and
they fell back. I took advantage of this circumstance to fall back, beyond
a point where I knew the force of infantry from Chambers' could get
into our rear. We fell back without haste and in good order; halted once
ten minutes for the men to rest, and after placing my men in good
position on the railroad, or rather behind the bank of it, ordered them
to eat their dinners, thinking they would have about time to eat before
the enemy would be down. I should have crossed the bayou immediately
had it not been high water and therefore impassable. The men has
scarcely finished their dinners when a force of infantry of about 150 on
the left of the road, and about the same number on the right, were
discovered advancing through the brush. I kept my men down, and
when they were within short musket range I opened fire. They stood
two rounds and then left. They tried this three times, my men behaving
all the time with the utmost coolness. The third time they gained
possession of a small portion of the railroad, on the left of Company E,
Second U. S. Colored Infantry. I ordered the negroes to charge, which
they did in fine style, let by Sergt. William Wilson, who behaved very
bravely. The enemy broke and scattered in every direction and did not
attempt to face us again. When the water had fallen enough to allow of
crossing I made a feint of pushing up the railroad, and in that way
succeeded in bringing more than half of my force across before the
movement was discovered. It was then too late for them to do us much
damage, though they wounded 3 men.

I think their intention was to have this place. I know they have boats
building on the Suwannee River. They can be placed upon cars and put
into the water at Station 4 in six or eight hours. I do not apprehend any
danger from them now. I am throwing up rifle-pits as fast as I can, and
in a few days shall consider this place safe against any force that they
may be able to bring, and also know that in any operations on this
portion of the coast it will be necessary to move in pretty strong force.
We have some 30 or 40 able-bodied negroes here. Shall I enlist them,
and for what regiment?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg. Forces.

Gen. D. P. WOODBURY,
Cmdg. Dist. of Key West and Tortugas.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLVII.] OPERATIONS ON WEST COAST OF FLORIDA. PAGE 406-65
[Series I. Vol. 35. Part I, Reports and Correspondence. Serial No. 65.]

***************************************************************************************


Report of Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, Second Florida Cavalry (Union.)

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, Fla., February 16, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to report for the information of the commanding
general that an expedition was made by the forces under my command,
consisting of 186 men of the Second Regt. Florida Cavalry and 200
men of the Second Regt. U. S. Colored Infantry, under Maj.
Lincoln, through Levy County to Levyville and Clay Landing, agreeably
to the plan submitted to you in my letter of the 8th of February, 1865.
Left this post Wednesday morning, February 8, 1865; six miles from
Station Four succeeded in capturing 3 men and 4 horses, a portion of a
cavalry picket of seven men stationed at Yearty's. Hurried to Levyville
in one day. Arrived there Friday morning, February 10, and captured
10 horses, some 50 contrabands, and a wagon. The force under Maj.
Lincoln surprised, but did not succeed in capturing the company at Clay
Landing; they made their escape across the river in boats. He destroyed
a good amount of commissary stores and other Government supplies.
The road to Bronson being most of the way through swamp, and being
obliged to detach the most of one company to guard prisoners and
contrabands, I concluded to return to Station Four. Upon leaving
Levyville my rear guard was attack by a squad of fifteen cavalrymen;
two of my men were wounded, one severely. The enemy lost at least
one man and several horses. I was not molested
again during my march, although their scouts were constantly in sight
in our rear. Arrived at Station Four at 3 p. m. on Sunday, February 12,
with 100 head of cattle, several wagons, 50 contrabands, 13 horses, 5
prisoners, and every man I took out with me; all in excellent spirits.
Sent the prisoners to Depot Key, posted pickets, left Capt. E. Pease,
Second U. S. Colored Infantry, in command, and then went to the Key
for the purpose of hurrying up transportation for the wounded soldiers,
contrabands, and the beef, and also to make preparations more complete
to finish the raid to Bay Port which I had commenced. At 7 [o'clock]
Monday morning, February 13, heard heavy firing at Station Four.
Returned there as soon as possible; found our men flying in all
directions; left an officer to halt and bring them up. Upon arriving at the
trestle this side of Station Four I found some sixty of the Second Florida
Cavalry. I immediately pushed them across the bridge (the enemy were
in possession of the end next to Station Four). At this time Capt.
Pease, with about forty men, all that remained with him, charged at the
enemy who were making an attack on our camp. The enemy, from 250
to 300 strong, with two pieces of artillery, commenced giving way. We
took the bridge, and as soon as possible after crossing I deployed my
men on the right and left of the road as skirmishers; drove the enemy
gradually back until they broke and took to flight . I followed them
about two miles; mounted some half dozen men, under Lieut.
Poole, Second Florida Cavalry, with orders to follow them until they
halted for the night. (In the meantime I sent our wounded to Depot
Key.) He followed them six miles, too Yearty's, where he could see
they were re-enforced by a large body of infantry and were again
marching out to meet, us moving down toward Station Four. I had
collected and organized our scattered forces, and found I had about 250
men. With that small force, considering the condition they were in, I did
not deem it prudent to receive a night attack. I crossed the bridge, and
about twenty minutes afterward the enemy moved into our camp. I have
since learned that Gen. Miller arrived with 500 infantry and four
pieces of artillery. The fight lasted from 7 a. m. to 12 m. The casualties
on our side amounted to 1 officer wounded (Second Lieut. T.
Killean, jr., Company G, Second U. S., Colored Infantry), 5 privates
killed, 6 corporals and 11 privates wounded, 1 first sergeant and 2
privates taken prisoners. I have not ascertained the losses of the enemy,
though they left 2 of their killed on the field.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg. Post.

Capt. E. B. TRACY,
A. A. A. G., Hdqrs. Dist. of Key West and Tortugas, Key West.


Source: Official Records
ACTION AT STATION FOUR, FLA. PAGE 40-103
[Series I. Vol. 49. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 103.]

***************************************************************************************


Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, Second Florida Cavalry (Union).

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, Fla., March 9, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to report for the information of the general
commanding that all the forces under my command (with the exception
of a sufficient guard over the Government stores left at this post) were
embarked on board the U. S. steam gun-boat Magnolia on Monday
noon, February 27, 1865. At daylight next day, Tuesday, came to
anchor at the bar off Saint Mark's. Owing to a dense fog did not
communicate with the other vessels of the expedition until Wednesday.
On Thursday (March 2) landed six men, under William Strickland, at
the mouth of the Aucilla River, with orders to burn the railroad bridge
at the head of that stream. Did not effect a landing at the Little Aucilla
as contemplated with another detachment (for the purpose of cutting the
railroad in the rear of Saint Mark's) owing to the number of pickets
stationed there. Another party, under Mr. Green, citizen, was landed
near Shell Point, with orders to proceed to the Ocklockonee Railroad
bridge and burn it. On Friday, at 7 p. m., agreeable to orders, I landed
with sixty men of the Second Florida Cavalry and a detachment of thirty
sailors, under Acting Ensign Whitman. I dispatched Mr. Whitman up
East River, with orders to proceed to the bridge, about four miles from
the light-house, and to secure if possible the picket stationed there and
to hold the bridge until I should come up. Owing to the strong wind
blowing I did not succeed in effecting a landing until midnight.
Advanced immediately up to the bridge, where I arrived at 4 a. m.
Found that Mr. Whitman had surprised the picket but did not capture it,
as they fled, leaving their arms, one horse, & C. At sunrise I was
attacked by a cavalry force of about sixty men. Repulsed them without
loss on our part. Killed several of the rebels and wounded three or four
of them. Sent a mounted officer to the light-house to see whether the
troops had landed, with the intention, if they had landed, to hold the
bridge. Upon his return, reporting that the ships were ashore at the bar
and no troops landed, I concluded to fall back to the light-house,
knowing that I could not hold my position without re-enforcements.
They skirmished with me until I arrived at the light-house.

Upon arriving at Newport, on Sunday, at 11 a. m., I discovered the
bridge over Newport River on fire, and agreeable to orders I charged
on the enemy for the purpose of saving the bridge--all under heavy fire.
Found the enemy strongly posted behind entrenchments on opposite side,
and found that the bridge was burned at one end and cut off at the other,
and that the enemy had complete command of the approach to the bridge
with their musketry. Having two pieces of artillery I posted one to play
directly across the bridge, and the other on the right to enfilade their
pits. I did not succeed in driving them out. Upon being ordered to
remain at Newport to guard the bridge I posted sharpshooters along the
river. They were engaged most of the day and night. On Monday, at 2
p. m., the enemy opened fire with one piece of artillery on my pickets
in rear of my camp. They kept up a sharp and well-directed fire of
artillery and musketry for four hours. They endeavored to get hold on
the bridge, first to repair it, and afterward to cross it. I repulsed them.
I cannot speak in too high terms of praise of the assistance rendered by
Capt. Ransom, of Gen. Newton's staff, in promoting the success
of my movements. The officers and men under me, one and all,
behaved in the most creditable manner.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg. Post.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GEN.,
District of Key West and Tortugas, Key West.


Source: Official Records
PAGE 69-103 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.
[Series I. Vol. 49. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 103.]

P1505806.gif


Isaac J. Rich

Residence was not listed; 25 years old.

Enlisted on 8/8/1862 at Albion, NY as a Private.

On 8/13/1862 he mustered into "B" Co. NY 110th Infantry
He was discharged for promotion on 2/1/1865

On 2/1/1865 he was commissioned into "E" Co. FL 2nd Cavalry
He was Mustered Out on 11/29/1865 at Tallahassee, FL


Promotions:
* Corpl 5/1/1863
* 1st Sergt 7/1/1863
* 1st Lieut 2/1/1865 (As of Co. E 2nd FL Cavalry)


Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- New York: Report of the Adjutant-General 1893-1906
- Biographical Rosters of Florida's Soldiers 1861-1865
- Photo Courtesy of New York State Military Museum
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
........................................................................................................
Fort Myers, Fla.,
Feb. 20, 1865.

Garrison under Capt. James Doyle.

About 400 Confederates approached Fort Myers a little after
noon, after having captured the picket of 4 men. A demand
for a surrender was sent in, but it was at once refused and at
1:10 p. m. the enemy opened with his artillery. An artillery
duel was kept up all afternoon and the 2nd Fla. cavalry thrown
out as skirmishers. Soon after dark the Confederates withdrew.

The only Federal loss was a few men taken prisoners.


Source: The Union Army, Vol. 5, p.430
...................................................................................................
NATURAL BRIDGE, FLA.
MARCH 6TH, 1865

Natural Bridge, Fla., March 6, 1865. 2nd and 99th U.S.
Infantry, Colored. At daylight Maj. Benjamin Lincoln with two
companies of the 2nd U.S. colored infantry drove the advanced
pickets of the Confederates over the Natural bridge, further
pursuit being stopped by a deep slough. Learning that there
was no other way of crossing it was determined to force a
passage and while three companies attempted a direct assault
three others were to attempt to turn the Confederate right.
The enemy fled from their works on Lincoln's approach, and
again the slough stopped further progress. No casualties were
reported. The affair was one of the incidents of the
operations about Saint Mark's.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 6





 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
FLORIDA VOLUNTEERS.
1st REGIMENT CAVALRY.
Organized: Various Places 12/62 to 8/64 on 12/1/62
Mustered Out: 11/17/65

FLORIDA VOLUNTEERS.
1st REGIMENT CAVALRY.

Authorized by Gen. Banks October 29, 1863, and on ganized at Barrancas, Fla., December,
1863, to August, 1864. Attached to Pensacola, Fla., District West Florida, Dept. Gulf,
to October, 1864. 2nd Brigade, District West Florida, to January, 1865. 3rd Brigade,
District West Florida, to March, 1865. 2nd Brigade, Lucas' Cavalry Division, Steele's
Command, to May, 1865. District of West Florida to November, 1865.

SERVICE.-Duty at Barrancas, Fla., till March, 1865. Expedition from Barrancas toward
Pollard, Ala., July 21-25, 1864. Actions at Camp Gonzales July 22, and near Pollard
July 23. Expedition from Barrancas August 1314. Expedition from Barrancas to Mariana
September 18-October 4. Euche Anna C. H. September 23. Mariana September 27. Vernon
September 28. Expedition up Blackwater Bay October 25-28.. Milton October 26. Expedition
from Barrancas to Pine Barren Creek November 16-17. Pine Barren Creek and Bridge
November 17. Expedition to Pollard, Ala., December 13-19. Bluff Springs and Pollard
December 15. Escanabia Bridge December 15-16. Pine Barren Ford December 17-18.
Expedition from Barrancas to Milton February 22-25, 1865. Milton February 23.
Campaign against Mobile and its defences March 18-April 9. March to Blakely, Ala.,
March 18-31. (Dismounted men remain at Barrancas.) Expedition to Alabama & Florida R. R.
March 18-25. Near Evergreen March 24. Muddy Creek, Ala., March 26. Siege of Fort
Blakely March 31-April 9. Near Blakely April 1. Occupation of Mobile April 12.
March to Montgomery April 13-25. Duty there and in Alabama till May. Ordered to
Barrancas,. Fla., and duty in Western and Middle Florida till November.

Mustered out November 17, 1865.

Frederick A. Dyer "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" vol. 3

Pine Barren Bridge, Fla.,
Nov. 17, 1864.

Detachments of 2nd Maine and 1st Florida Cavalry.

Lieut.-Col. Andrew B. Spurling, with 450 men, while on an
expedition from Barrancas to Pine Barren bridge, captured the
Confederate picket at the bridge, then charged across,
surprised and captured the entire guard, 38 in number, with 47
horses, 3 miles and 75 stands of arms, without firing a shot.

Source: The Union Army,Vol.,6 p.,690

...................................................................................................................................
Second Florida (Union) Cavalry
( 3-years )
Organized: Cedar Keys, Key West, Tortugas on 12/1/63
Mustered Out: 11/29/65


Organized at Cedar Keys and Key West, Fla, Decem ber, 1863, to June, 1864. Attached to
District of Key' West and Tortugas, Dept. of the Gulf, and Dept. of Florida, to November,
1865.

SERVICE.-Duty at Fort Myers, Cedar Keys and in District of Key West till June, 1865.
Skirmishes at Pease Creek, Fla, February 13-14 and February 20, 1864. Attack on Fort
Myers February 20. Affair at Tampa May 6. Operations on West Coast of Florida July 1-31.
Expedition to Bayport July 1-4. Skirmish at Station Four, near Cedar Keys, July 6.
Expedition to St. Andrews Bay July 20-29. Fort Myers August 26. Expedition to Bayport
October 1, and to St. Andrews Bay October 20-29. Near Magnolia October 24. Expedition
to Otter Creek, on Florida R. R., October 30-31. Braddock's Farm, near Welaka,
February 5, 1865. Station Four, near Cedar Keys, February 13. Attack on Fort Myers
February 20. Operations near St. Marks. February 21-March 7. East River Bridge March
4-5 Newport Bridge March 5-6. Natural Bridge March 6. Occupation of Tampa May 27.
Duty in District of Florida till November.

Mustered out November 29 1865.

Frederick A. Dyer "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" vol. 3

**********************************************************************

Reports of Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, Second Florida (Union) Cavalry,
of skirmish near Station No. 4, near Cedar Keys, Fla.

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, July 8, 1864.
SIR: I have the honor to report, for the information of the commanding
general:

Learning that there was a force concentrating at Station 4, I thought it
best to try and discover in what force, and what their designs might be.

On the morning of the 6th instant, I took out 200 men, and advanced 3
miles beyond Station 4, found the enemy, skirmished with him until I
discovered he had a large force, and then fall back to the bayou. The
men behaved very well; marched back in good order. I remained at the
bayou six hours, it being high water so that I could not cross. They
assaulted us three times with about twice our number, and were
handsomely whipped each time. When the water fell, succeeded in
crossing the bayou and returning to Day Key. Loss, 8 men wounded, 2
dangerously; no loss of arms.

Lieut. Pease and men behaved well. I am much pleased with the
conduct of my regiment.

The rebel force consisted of four companies of infantry, one company
cavalry, and some home guards. Their loss was at least double our own.

Will write particulars by first opportunity.

Respectfully,

EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg.

Capt. MARCELLUS BAILEY,
Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

-----

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, July 9, 1864.
GEN.: My letter to you was necessarily brief for want of time. I
will now explain my object in advancing up the railroad. I had been
informed by quite a number of professed Union men that there was not
a soldier this side of Baldwin, and that 200 men could go through the
entire State.

Tuesday quite an intelligent negro came in from a place called Sodom,
near Otter Creek. He reported four companies of infantry at Chamber's
plantation (8 miles above Station 4), and a company of cavalry half way
between the two places, and that the cars had commenced running down
as far as Chambers'. From him I also learned that there ware 74 bales
of cotton at Otter Creek. I deemed it advisable to take all the force I
could spare from here and push our as far as Chambers', and if I found
that there was a force, discover its strength, and, if possible, its designs.
If I did not meet with a force, I intended to have pushed on to Otter
Creek, and to have captured the cotton, to have sent it down the river,
and then to have returned.

Lieut. Pease led the advance with 50 men of his company, and had
pushed on to about 3 miles beyond Station 4, where he came upon a
cavalry picket. They discovered him first and immediately sounded the
alarm. I was some distance in the rear. Learning that he had met the
enemy I sent him word to place his men in as good a position as
possible, and to hold the enemy in check until I could come up. When
I arrived he was falling back, being nearly surrounded. I threw my men
behind the bank of the railroad, placing him on the right; the rebels
dismounted and pushed up pretty sharply. I tried to restrain my men
from firing till the enemy would come within short range, but through
the eagerness of the negroes to engage them, the firing commenced
before I gave the order. That rather alarmed them, and
they fell back. I took advantage of this circumstance to fall back, beyond
a point where I knew the force of infantry from Chambers' could get
into our rear. We fell back without haste and in good order; halted once
ten minutes for the men to rest, and after placing my men in good
position on the railroad, or rather behind the bank of it, ordered them
to eat their dinners, thinking they would have about time to eat before
the enemy would be down. I should have crossed the bayou immediately
had it not been high water and therefore impassable. The men has
scarcely finished their dinners when a force of infantry of about 150 on
the left of the road, and about the same number on the right, were
discovered advancing through the brush. I kept my men down, and
when they were within short musket range I opened fire. They stood
two rounds and then left. They tried this three times, my men behaving
all the time with the utmost coolness. The third time they gained
possession of a small portion of the railroad, on the left of Company E,
Second U. S. Colored Infantry. I ordered the negroes to charge, which
they did in fine style, let by Sergt. William Wilson, who behaved very
bravely. The enemy broke and scattered in every direction and did not
attempt to face us again. When the water had fallen enough to allow of
crossing I made a feint of pushing up the railroad, and in that way
succeeded in bringing more than half of my force across before the
movement was discovered. It was then too late for them to do us much
damage, though they wounded 3 men.

I think their intention was to have this place. I know they have boats
building on the Suwannee River. They can be placed upon cars and put
into the water at Station 4 in six or eight hours. I do not apprehend any
danger from them now. I am throwing up rifle-pits as fast as I can, and
in a few days shall consider this place safe against any force that they
may be able to bring, and also know that in any operations on this
portion of the coast it will be necessary to move in pretty strong force.
We have some 30 or 40 able-bodied negroes here. Shall I enlist them,
and for what regiment?

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg. Forces.

Gen. D. P. WOODBURY,
Cmdg. Dist. of Key West and Tortugas.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLVII.] OPERATIONS ON WEST COAST OF FLORIDA. PAGE 406-65
[Series I. Vol. 35. Part I, Reports and Correspondence. Serial No. 65.]

***************************************************************************************

Report of Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, Second Florida Cavalry (Union.)

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, Fla., February 16, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to report for the information of the commanding
general that an expedition was made by the forces under my command,
consisting of 186 men of the Second Regt. Florida Cavalry and 200
men of the Second Regt. U. S. Colored Infantry, under Maj.
Lincoln, through Levy County to Levyville and Clay Landing, agreeably
to the plan submitted to you in my letter of the 8th of February, 1865.
Left this post Wednesday morning, February 8, 1865; six miles from
Station Four succeeded in capturing 3 men and 4 horses, a portion of a
cavalry picket of seven men stationed at Yearty's. Hurried to Levyville
in one day. Arrived there Friday morning, February 10, and captured
10 horses, some 50 contrabands, and a wagon. The force under Maj.
Lincoln surprised, but did not succeed in capturing the company at Clay
Landing; they made their escape across the river in boats. He destroyed
a good amount of commissary stores and other Government supplies.
The road to Bronson being most of the way through swamp, and being
obliged to detach the most of one company to guard prisoners and
contrabands, I concluded to return to Station Four. Upon leaving
Levyville my rear guard was attack by a squad of fifteen cavalrymen;
two of my men were wounded, one severely. The enemy lost at least
one man and several horses. I was not molested
again during my march, although their scouts were constantly in sight
in our rear. Arrived at Station Four at 3 p. m. on Sunday, February 12,
with 100 head of cattle, several wagons, 50 contrabands, 13 horses, 5
prisoners, and every man I took out with me; all in excellent spirits.
Sent the prisoners to Depot Key, posted pickets, left Capt. E. Pease,
Second U. S. Colored Infantry, in command, and then went to the Key
for the purpose of hurrying up transportation for the wounded soldiers,
contrabands, and the beef, and also to make preparations more complete
to finish the raid to Bay Port which I had commenced. At 7 [o'clock]
Monday morning, February 13, heard heavy firing at Station Four.
Returned there as soon as possible; found our men flying in all
directions; left an officer to halt and bring them up. Upon arriving at the
trestle this side of Station Four I found some sixty of the Second Florida
Cavalry. I immediately pushed them across the bridge (the enemy were
in possession of the end next to Station Four). At this time Capt.
Pease, with about forty men, all that remained with him, charged at the
enemy who were making an attack on our camp. The enemy, from 250
to 300 strong, with two pieces of artillery, commenced giving way. We
took the bridge, and as soon as possible after crossing I deployed my
men on the right and left of the road as skirmishers; drove the enemy
gradually back until they broke and took to flight . I followed them
about two miles; mounted some half dozen men, under Lieut.
Poole, Second Florida Cavalry, with orders to follow them until they
halted for the night. (In the meantime I sent our wounded to Depot
Key.) He followed them six miles, too Yearty's, where he could see
they were re-enforced by a large body of infantry and were again
marching out to meet, us moving down toward Station Four. I had
collected and organized our scattered forces, and found I had about 250
men. With that small force, considering the condition they were in, I did
not deem it prudent to receive a night attack. I crossed the bridge, and
about twenty minutes afterward the enemy moved into our camp. I have
since learned that Gen. Miller arrived with 500 infantry and four
pieces of artillery. The fight lasted from 7 a. m. to 12 m. The casualties
on our side amounted to 1 officer wounded (Second Lieut. T.
Killean, jr., Company G, Second U. S., Colored Infantry), 5 privates
killed, 6 corporals and 11 privates wounded, 1 first sergeant and 2
privates taken prisoners. I have not ascertained the losses of the enemy,
though they left 2 of their killed on the field.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg. Post.

Capt. E. B. TRACY,
A. A. A. G., Hdqrs. Dist. of Key West and Tortugas, Key West.

Source: Official Records
ACTION AT STATION FOUR, FLA. PAGE 40-103
[Series I. Vol. 49. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 103.]

***************************************************************************************

Maj. Edmund C. Weeks, Second Florida Cavalry (Union).

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES,
Cedar Keys, Fla., March 9, 1865.
SIR: I have the honor to report for the information of the general
commanding that all the forces under my command (with the exception
of a sufficient guard over the Government stores left at this post) were
embarked on board the U. S. steam gun-boat Magnolia on Monday
noon, February 27, 1865. At daylight next day, Tuesday, came to
anchor at the bar off Saint Mark's. Owing to a dense fog did not
communicate with the other vessels of the expedition until Wednesday.
On Thursday (March 2) landed six men, under William Strickland, at
the mouth of the Aucilla River, with orders to burn the railroad bridge
at the head of that stream. Did not effect a landing at the Little Aucilla
as contemplated with another detachment (for the purpose of cutting the
railroad in the rear of Saint Mark's) owing to the number of pickets
stationed there. Another party, under Mr. Green, citizen, was landed
near Shell Point, with orders to proceed to the Ocklockonee Railroad
bridge and burn it. On Friday, at 7 p. m., agreeable to orders, I landed
with sixty men of the Second Florida Cavalry and a detachment of thirty
sailors, under Acting Ensign Whitman. I dispatched Mr. Whitman up
East River, with orders to proceed to the bridge, about four miles from
the light-house, and to secure if possible the picket stationed there and
to hold the bridge until I should come up. Owing to the strong wind
blowing I did not succeed in effecting a landing until midnight.
Advanced immediately up to the bridge, where I arrived at 4 a. m.
Found that Mr. Whitman had surprised the picket but did not capture it,
as they fled, leaving their arms, one horse, & C. At sunrise I was
attacked by a cavalry force of about sixty men. Repulsed them without
loss on our part. Killed several of the rebels and wounded three or four
of them. Sent a mounted officer to the light-house to see whether the
troops had landed, with the intention, if they had landed, to hold the
bridge. Upon his return, reporting that the ships were ashore at the bar
and no troops landed, I concluded to fall back to the light-house,
knowing that I could not hold my position without re-enforcements.
They skirmished with me until I arrived at the light-house.

Upon arriving at Newport, on Sunday, at 11 a. m., I discovered the
bridge over Newport River on fire, and agreeable to orders I charged
on the enemy for the purpose of saving the bridge--all under heavy fire.
Found the enemy strongly posted behind entrenchments on opposite side,
and found that the bridge was burned at one end and cut off at the other,
and that the enemy had complete command of the approach to the bridge
with their musketry. Having two pieces of artillery I posted one to play
directly across the bridge, and the other on the right to enfilade their
pits. I did not succeed in driving them out. Upon being ordered to
remain at Newport to guard the bridge I posted sharpshooters along the
river. They were engaged most of the day and night. On Monday, at 2
p. m., the enemy opened fire with one piece of artillery on my pickets
in rear of my camp. They kept up a sharp and well-directed fire of
artillery and musketry for four hours. They endeavored to get hold on
the bridge, first to repair it, and afterward to cross it. I repulsed them.
I cannot speak in too high terms of praise of the assistance rendered by
Capt. Ransom, of Gen. Newton's staff, in promoting the success
of my movements. The officers and men under me, one and all,
behaved in the most creditable manner.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDMUND C. WEEKS,
Maj. Second Florida Cavalry, Cmdg. Post.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GEN.,
District of Key West and Tortugas, Key West.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 69-103 KY., S. W. VA., TENN., N. & C. GA., MISS., ALA., & W. FLA.
[Series I. Vol. 49. Part I, Reports, Correspondence, Etc. Serial No. 103.]

P1505806.gif


Isaac J. Rich

Residence was not listed; 25 years old.

Enlisted on 8/8/1862 at Albion, NY as a Private.

On 8/13/1862 he mustered into "B" Co. NY 110th Infantry
He was discharged for promotion on 2/1/1865

On 2/1/1865 he was commissioned into "E" Co. FL 2nd Cavalry
He was Mustered Out on 11/29/1865 at Tallahassee, FL

Promotions:
* Corpl 5/1/1863
* 1st Sergt 7/1/1863
* 1st Lieut 2/1/1865 (As of Co. E 2nd FL Cavalry)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- New York: Report of the Adjutant-General 1893-1906
- Biographical Rosters of Florida's Soldiers 1861-1865
- Photo Courtesy of New York State Military Museum
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
........................................................................................................
Fort Myers, Fla.,
Feb. 20, 1865.

Garrison under Capt. James Doyle.

About 400 Confederates approached Fort Myers a little after
noon, after having captured the picket of 4 men. A demand
for a surrender was sent in, but it was at once refused and at
1:10 p. m. the enemy opened with his artillery. An artillery
duel was kept up all afternoon and the 2nd Fla. cavalry thrown
out as skirmishers. Soon after dark the Confederates withdrew.

The only Federal loss was a few men taken prisoners.

Source: The Union Army, Vol. 5, p.430
...................................................................................................
NATURAL BRIDGE, FLA.
MARCH 6TH, 1865

Natural Bridge, Fla., March 6, 1865. 2nd and 99th U.S.
Infantry, Colored. At daylight Maj. Benjamin Lincoln with two
companies of the 2nd U.S. colored infantry drove the advanced
pickets of the Confederates over the Natural bridge, further
pursuit being stopped by a deep slough. Learning that there
was no other way of crossing it was determined to force a
passage and while three companies attempted a direct assault
three others were to attempt to turn the Confederate right.
The enemy fled from their works on Lincoln's approach, and
again the slough stopped further progress. No casualties were
reported. The affair was one of the incidents of the
operations about Saint Mark's.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 6


Great research! I was not aware of white and black Union troops fighting together in the the sense of one small unit is fighting side by side another small unit to jointly accomplish a given mission. I know there was fighting in Fl but it receives limited mention. Professor Williams in his book "the South bitterly divided "mentions Unionst guerrilla's being supplied by the Union Navy but not under formal operational command. I don't know to much about them. Prof Williams also mentions various pro-Union deserter gangs in Fl.
Leftyhunter
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
Great research! I was not aware of white and black Union troops fighting together in the the sense of one small unit is fighting side by side another small unit to jointly accomplish a given mission. I know there was fighting in Fl but it receives limited mention. Professor Williams in his book "the South bitterly divided "mentions Unionst guerrilla's being supplied by the Union Navy but not under formal operational command. I don't know to much about them. Prof Williams also mentions various pro-Union deserter gangs in Fl.
Leftyhunter
Thanks , one of my favorite books, " Lincoln's Loyalists " by Richard Current. Being from east Tennessee and having
Union veterans among my ancestors, I was aware of the Union sentiment in the border States. I had no idea about the lower south. I believe South Carolina was the only Confederate State with no organized military unit in the Union ranks, but South Carolinians served in other units.
 
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