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Southern Unionist Chronicles ....East Tennessee

Discussion in 'Civil War History - General Discussion' started by east tennessee roots, Mar 7, 2014.

  1. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 1st Lieutenant

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    [​IMG]


    COL S.K.N. PATTON
    8TH TENN
    CAVALRY
    USA
    CIVIL WAR
    OF
    1861 - 1865
    S.K.N. PATTON
    BORN
    MARCH 6, 1816
    DIED
    FEBY 3, 1886
    Here is the solder's recompense
    His is a patriot's grave
    Where calm in death reposes
    Our noble true and brave
    .....................................................................................

    Samuel K. N. Patton

    Enlisted on 4/1/1864 as a Colonel.

    On 4/1/1864 he was commissioned into Field & Staff TN 8th Cavalry
    He was Mustered Out on 9/11/1865 at Knoxville, TN


    Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

    - Index to Compiled Military Service Records
    - Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force 1861-1865
    - Report of Adjutant General State of Tennessee
    (c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
    ..................................................................................................................................
    Eighth Cavalry
    TENNEESSE
    (3-YEARS)
    Eighth Cavalry. -- Cols., Jesse H. Strickland, Samuel K. N.
    Patton; Lieut.- Cols., Thomas J. Capps, Andrew J. Brown;
    Majs., Jeremiah Achey, Charles H. Bentley, Wilson W. Willis,
    William B. Davis, James E. Deakins, William J. S. Denton,
    Christopher C. Kenner, John M. Sawyer.

    This regiment was composed of two fractions of regiments known
    as the 8th and 10th East Tenn. cavalry.

    The 8th regiment was begun in Kentucky in June, 1863, under
    Lieut.-Col. Capps, and was first known as the 5th regiment
    East Tenn. cavalry. It saw some active service in the field
    in both Kentucky and Tennessee under Gen. Burnside; was at the
    surrender of Cumberland Gap, took an active part in the fights
    at Blountsville and Rheatown; was besieged in Knoxville, and
    rendered material aid in defending that post.

    The 10th regiment had its origin in East Tennessee in Sept.,
    1863, by authority granted to Col. Patton by Gen. Burnside.
    It saw some active service in East Tennessee under Gens.
    Shackelford and Willcox, Cols. Casement and Harney during the
    fall of that year. In Dec., 1863, it was sent to Camp Nelson,
    Ky., in charge of prisoners.

    On Feb. 6, 1864, these two fractions were consolidated by
    order of Gov. Johnson. Col. Patton completed the regiment and
    assumed command of it at Columbia in the April following.

    It remained there and at Franklin guarding the railroad until
    June 19, when it was ordered to Gallatin, where it remained
    doing similar duty until September. It was then ordered to
    East Tennessee, where it joined the 9th and 13th regiments,
    and during the remainder of the year was almost continuously
    engaged in marching and fighting.

    On March 21, 1865, such portions of the command as were
    mounted, joined Gen. Stoneman on his raid into Virginia, the
    Carolinas and Georgia. The command was finally reunited and
    went into camp at Lenoir's station in June 1865. It was
    mustered out at Knoxville, Sept. 11, 1865.

    Source: The Union Army, vol. 4, p. 386
    ......................................................................................................................
    8th TN Cavalry
    ( 3-years )
    Organized: on 6/1/63
    Mustered Out: 9/11/65 at Knoxville, TN

    Officers Killed or Mortally Wounded: 1
    Officers Died of Disease, Accidents, etc.: 1
    Enlisted Men Killed or Mortally Wounded: 37
    Enlisted Men Died of Disease, Accidents, etc.: 241
    (Source: Fox, Regimental Losses)
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014

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  3. leftyhunter

    leftyhunter Major

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    I am wondering if Col. Patton was related to the same Patton family that gave birth to Gen. George Patton of WWII fame? I understand Gen. Patton's grandfather and some uncles where officers in the CSA and there is a book published about them called "the fighting Patton's. Georges father was elected District Attorney of Los Angeles County.
    Leftyhunter
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2014
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  4. 63rdOVI

    63rdOVI Corporal

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    Gen. Patton's grandfather, Col. George Smith Patton, was the colonel of the 1st Kanawha Regiment which became the 22nd Virginia Infantry. He was a lawyer in Charleston, (West) Virginia before the war (his house still stands in a city park there), and was killed at the Third Battle of Winchester in 1864. His brother Waller Tazewell Patton was a lieutenant colonel of the 7th Virginia Infantry and was mortally wounded during Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg.
     
  5. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 1st Lieutenant

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    Those Pattons were from nearby southwest Virginia. Could have been cousins maybe ?
     
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  6. leftyhunter

    leftyhunter Major

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    I would not be surprised. Even Gen.Lee had a nephew who was a Union Officer. I am a bit hazy but there where two brothers I believe there name was Crinteon or something like that who where generals on opposite sides. The CSA partisan leader Sam Hilderbrand had a brother in the Union Army.
    Leftyhunter
     
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  7. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 1st Lieutenant

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    Believe their father was a U.S. Senator ?
    [​IMG]


    Crittenden, Thomas L., major-general, was born in Rus-
    sellville, Ky. May 15, 1819, studied law under his father, was
    admitted to the bar, and was elected commonwealth's attorney in
    Kentucky in 1842. 1n the Mexican war he served as lieutenant-
    colonel of Kentucky infantry, and was volunteer aide to Gen.
    Taylor in the battle of Buena Vista. He was from 1849 to 1853,
    under appointment from President Taylor, consul to Liverpool,
    then returned to the United States, resided for a time in
    Frankfort, and afterwards engaged in mercantile pursuits in
    Louisville, Ky. Espousing the Union cause at the beginning of
    the Civil war, he was commissioned brigadier-general, Oct. 27,
    At Shiloh he commanded a division and won by gallantry on that field promotion to major-general of volunteers, being assigned
    to command of a division in the Army of the Tennessee. He com-
    manded the 2nd corps, forming the left wing of Gen. Buell's
    Army of the Ohio, served afterwards under Gen. Rosecrans in the
    battle of Stone's river, and at Chickamauga commanded one of
    the two corps that were routed. He was afterwards given com-
    mand of a division of the 9th corps, Army of the Potomac, and
    operated with that corps in the campaign of 1864. He resigned,
    Dec. 13, 1864 but was afterwards commissioned by President
    Johnson colonel of the 32nd U. S. infantry, and in 1869 was
    transferred to the 17th infantry. He was retired by reason of
    his age, May, 1881. Gen Crittenden won by gallantry at Stone's
    river the brevet of brigadier-general in the regular army,
    which was conferred on him, March 2, 1867. He died at Annan-
    dale, Staten 1sland N. Y., Oct. 23, 1893.


    Source: The Union Army, vol. 8

    ...............................................................................................................

    CRITTENDEN, GEORGE BIBB
    [​IMG] KENTUCKY.



    Colonel, Corps of Infantry, C. S. A., March 16, 1861..

    Brigadier general, P. A. C. S., August 15, 1861..

    Major general, P. A. C. S., November 9, 1861.

    Resigned October 23, 1862, and continued to serve as a
    volunteer during the war.


    Died at Danville, Ky., November 27, 1880.


    Commands.

    Brigade composed of the Sixteenth Mississippi, Twenty-
    first Georgia, Twenty-first North Carolina, and Fifteenth
    Alabama Regiments Infantry and Captain Courtney's Battery of
    Artillery, Longstreet's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.

    Assigned command of District of East Tennessee and
    military operations in East Tennessee and Kentucky, December
    8, 1861.

    Commanding Confederate forces at battle of Fisher's Creek,
    or Mill Springs, Ky., January 19, 1862.

    Commanding District of East Tennessee and military
    operations in East Tennessee and Kentucky.

    March 29, 1862, assigned command of Reserve Corps, Army of
    the Mississippi.

    Commanding Trans-Alleghany Department, May 31 to June 22,
    1864.

    September 5,1864, relieved of command of troops in East
    Tennessee; commanding as colonel.


    Crittenden, George Bibb, born in Kentucky, appointed from
    Kentucky cadet United States Military Academy, July 1, 1828;
    graduated twenty-sixth in a class of thirty-three.

    Brevet second lieutenant, Fourth Infantry, July 1, 1832.

    Resigned April 30,1833.

    Captain, Mounted Rifles, May 27, 1846.

    Major, March 15, 1848.

    Cashiered, August 19, 1848.

    Reinstated, March 15, 1849.

    Lieutenant colonel, December 30,1856.

    Brevet major, August 20, 1847, for gallant and meritorious
    conduct in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco, Mexico.

    Resigned June 10, 1861.

    Source: General Officers of the Confederate States of America

    ********************************************************************

    Major-General George Bibb Crittenden was born in Russellville,
    Logan county, Ky., March 20, 1821, and was the oldest son of
    J. J. Crittenden. He was graduated at West Point in 1832, but
    resigned from the army the next year.

    In 1835 he went to Texas and volunteered in the struggle for
    independence; was taken prisoner, and held by the Mexicans for
    nearly a year. At one time he generously took the place of a
    comrade who had drawn the fatal black bean when their captors
    had for some reason determined to adopt summary measures.

    After his release he returned to his native State and devoted
    himself for ten years to the practice of law. At the
    beginning of the Mexican war in 1846 he entered the army as
    captain of mounted rifles, was brevetted major for gallantry
    at Contreras end Churubusco, and on September 14, 1847;, was
    among the first to enter the city of Mexico, where he had once
    suffered such disagreeable captivity.

    Continuing in the service, most of his time was spent upon the
    frontier. In 1848 he was commissioned major and in 1856
    lieutenant- colonel. In the great sectional quarrel his
    sympathies were with the South.

    Accordingly he resigned his commission in the United States
    army and was appointed colonel of infantry in that of the
    Confederate States, to date March 16, 1861. On August 15th he
    was promoted to brigadier-general, and on November 9th to
    major-general in the provisional army.

    During the greater part of June, 1861, he had command of the
    Trans-Alleghany department. When commissioned major-general
    he was assigned to command of the district of East Tennessee
    and also placed in charge of military operations in Kentucky.

    Gen. Geo. H. Thomas early in January began an advance toward
    East Tennessee, and on the 17th reached Logan's Cross-roads,
    ten miles north of the intrenched camp of Gen. Felix K.
    Zollicoffer. A few days before this General Crittenden had
    arrived at Zollicoffer's camp and assumed command.

    Hearing of the arrival of Thomas, Crittenden determined to
    attack that general before all his forces should come up.
    With this purpose in view he advanced, and on January 19th
    made the attack. But Thomas was ready with more men than
    Crittenden had. The result was the disastrous defeat at Mill
    Springs, or Logan's Crossroads, in which General Zollicoffer
    was killed.

    For the management of this affair General Crittenden was
    censured and kept under arrest for several months. If General
    Crittenden really deserved censure it was for relying too much
    upon the reports brought to him as to the actual strength of
    the enemy and condition of Fishing creek which, it was said,
    was so swollen as to delay the reinforcement of the enemy. At
    a council of war held the evening before the battle, it was
    unanimously decided that an attack ought to be made.

    Brig;-Gen. Wm. H. Carroll, whose brigade did some of the best
    fighting of the day, in his report of the battle made to
    General Crittenden says: "I cannot close my report without
    expressing the high appreciation both by myself and my
    officers for the personal courage and skill evinced both by
    yourself and staff during the entire engagement; and however
    much I may regret the unfortunate disaster which befell us, I
    feel conscious that it resulted from no want of gallantry and
    military tact on the part of the commanding general."

    General Crittenden resigned after this affair, but showed his
    patriotic devotion to the South by serving without rank on the
    staff of Gen. J. S. Williams. Gen. Basil Duke, in an article
    on John Morgan in 1864, makes mention of Crittenden as in
    southwest Virginia assisting Morgan in defeating a raiding
    force led by General Averell.

    In his rank as colonel, C. S. A., he was put in temporary
    command of the department of Western Virginia and East
    Tennessee, May 31, 1864.

    After the war he returned to Kentucky and lived mostly at
    Frankfort. He was State librarian from 1867 to 1871. He died
    at Danville, Ky., November 27, 1880. General Crittenden had a
    brother, Thomas L., who sided with the Union, and rose to
    distinction as a major-general.

    Source: Confederate Military History, vol. XI, p. 232
     
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  8. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 1st Lieutenant

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    http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/f...y=2506&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=71835122&df=all&

    Elihu E. Ferguson

    Residence was not listed; 28 years old.

    Enlisted on 9/25/1863 as a Private.

    On 11/14/1863 he mustered into "I" Co. TN 8th Cavalry
    He was Mustered Out on 9/11/1865 at Knoxville, TN


    Promotions:
    * Blacksmith 12/31/1863


    Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

    - Index to Compiled Military Service Records
    - Report of Adjutant General State of Tennessee
    (c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
     
  9. kevikens

    kevikens 2nd Lieutenant

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    I was always curious about something. Do the folks in East Tennessee today see themselves as Confederates or Unionists in the way they view the war?
     
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  10. east tennessee roots

    east tennessee roots 1st Lieutenant

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    Most Civil War enthusiasts here I'm acquainted with are like me, having relatives on both sides. We generally admire and take pride in the service and sacrifice of both blue and gray. East Tennessee is still a very conservative and heavily republican area. East Tennesseans as a rule, are very patriotic.
     
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