Southern Unionist Chronicles ........ ALABAMA

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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
First Alabama Cavalry
Organized: Huntsville & Memphis, TN on 10/1/62
Mustered Out: 10/20/65 at Huntsville Ala


Report of Maj. Sanford Tramel, First Alabama
Cavalry of operations January 28-March 24.

HDQRS. FIRST ALABAMA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY,
Faison's Depot, N. C., March 28, 1865.
LIEUT.: I have the honor to report that in obedience to orders
received from your headquarters, my regiment under command of Maj.
F. L. Cramer, numbering 28 officers and 292 men for duty, broke camp
near Savannah Ga., on the 28th day of January, 1865, and moved with
the brigade on the Springfield road leading to Sister's Ferry on the
Savannah River. We arrived at Sister's Ferry on the evening of the
29th, and camped two miles from the river, where we remained until
the 3d day of February, when we crossed the river and commenced our
march in south Carolina in the direction of Lawtonville.

On the 4th Capt. J. J. Hinds, commanding Second Battalion, was
ordered back to Sister's Ferry to report to Maj.-Gen. Slocum, in
obedience to orders from the colonel commanding brigade. This left
only one battalion of 170 men in the regiment. On the 6th we had some
skirmishing with Crews' brigade, of Wheeler's command, capturing
some prisoners. On the 7th assisted in destroying Charleston and
Augusta Railroad. On the 8th we moved from Blackville on the road
to Williston, my regiment in advance. I, with two squadrons, was
ordered in the advance, and came to the rebel pickets just before
reaching the village. We routed and drove them through the town, and
established a picket-post half a mile west of the village, awaiting the
arrival of the command. The regiment soon arrived, and as we were
about to establish camp the picket-post was attacked. Capt. Latty, in
command of two squadrons, was immediately ordered forward with
instructions to ascertain, if possible the force the enemy had in the
vicinity. As he advanced the firing became rapid, and I, with the
remaining three squadrons, was ordered to Capt. Latty's assistance.
We drove them one mile and a half, where we found they had
established a strong line. Maj. Cramer was soon on the ground and
took command of the main body in the center, while I, with twenty
men, and Capt. Latty with the same number, moved on each flank of
the enemy, Maj. Cramer advancing with the center. This movement
routed them. We drove them half a mile, where they had another line.
This we broke also, and halted for a short time, when Col. Spencer,
Cmdg. brigade, re-enforced us with the Fifth Kentucky Cavalry.
We were then ordered to resume the chase, and on advancing found the
enemy in a strong position in the woods near White Pond. On being
ordered we charged them, when followed the most complete rout I ever
witnessed. Guns, sabers, canteens, haversacks, saddle-bags, hats, and
everything which would impede the flight of the affrighted and flying
enemy were abandoned and completely strewn over the ground. We
continued the pursuit over five miles, capturing quite a number of
prisoners, with five stand of colors. We were then ordered to abandon
the pursuit, and returned to camp at Williston. We ascertained we had
been contending against a greatly superior force of the enemy.

The conduct of the officers and men of my regiment on this occasion
was praiseworthy in the highest degree. The loss of the regiment was
four men wounded, one mortally, who afterward died.

On the 10th of February Capt. Hinds joined us with his battalion,
and the regiment was present at the fight near Aiken, but took no active
part, except to build a barricade and hold a position on the right. On the
11th we again resumed our march with the brigade, and participated in
all the different scenes through which it passed, crossing the Edisto,
Saluda, Broad, Wateree, and Great Pedee Rivers, via Lexington, Alston,
Black Stocks, Lancaster, and Sneedsborough nothing of special
importance occurring. After crossing the Great Pedee River and going
into camp at 9 o'clock on the evening of March 6, I was ordered to take
fifty men and proceed to Rockingham, N. C., about twelve miles distant,
and, if possible, take the place and secure the mail. I advanced to
within three miles of the place without meeting any opposition. I there
found the road strongly picketed by the enemy, and immediately ordered
my men to charge, which they did in a gallant manner, driving the
enemy from post to post until we reached the edge of the village, where
we found a line too strong for us to break with the small force at my
command; consequently I ordered the men to fall back slowly, which
they did in good order. I then returned to camp, arriving there at 4 a.m.
on the 7th. We again moved with the brigade on the 7th, via
Rockingham, and Solemn Grove, and on the evening of the 9th camped
at Monroe's Cross-Roads, having marched during the day in close
proximity with the enemy. At the sounding of reveille on the morning
of the 10th instant, we were aroused from sleep by the whistling of
bullets and the friendship yelling of the enemy, who were charging into
our camp. Then followed a most bloody hand-to-hand conflict, our men
forming behind trees and stumps and the enemy endeavoring to charge
us (mounted) with the saber.

While gallantly cheering his men Maj. F. L. Cramer was wounded
and taken prisoner.

The fighting was most desperate for an hour, when we succeeded in
connection with the Fifth Kentucky and Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry,
in driving the enemy away from our camps.

During the fight I was captured by the enemy and held as prisoner until
the 14th instant, when I succeeded in making my escape, and after three
days lying in the swamps and traveling nights, I succeeded in rejoining
my command.

After my capture Capt. J. J. Hinds took command of the regiment
and retained it until my return, and I am indebted to him for the gallant
manner in which he handled the command during the remainder of that
severe and terrible fight.

Capt. Peek deserves special mention for his gallant daring and
coolness during this struggle. The loss of the regiment in the affair was
4 men killed, 27 wounded, and 41 missing.

My regiment moved with the brigade, and was present when the cavalry
encountered the enemy on the evening of the 15th, also in the fight of
the 16th instant, but sustained no loss as it held a position on the left.
We next encountered the enemy in strong force on the 18th, but evaded
him by taking a road leading more to the right, while a portion of the
Fifth Kentucky Cavalry attracted his attention at a certain point. We
encountered the enemy again same day, but he was easily repulsed and
driven away. My regiment continued with the brigade; was present and
assisted in guarding the left flank of the army during the hard battles
of the 19th, 20th, and 21st instant. The enemy then being routed and
the campaign ended, my regiment moved with the brigade to Faison's
Depot, where we arrived on the 24th instant and have remained in camp
since that time.

During the campaign my regiment has captured something over 100
prisoners and over 200 horses.

The regiment has lost during the campaign; Maj. F. L. Cramer,
severely wounded and a prisoner; afterward paroled on account of
wounds. Capt. John Latty, Company C; First Lieut. George W.
Emerick, Company A; First Lieut. Joseph H. Hornback, Company
K, Second Lieut. George C. Jenkins, Company M, wounded
severely; Surge. J. G. C. Swaving and First Lieut. John P. Moore,
Company E, captured. Moore afterward escaped. Four enlisted men
killed, 28 wounded (2 or 3 mortally, who afterward died), 46 captured;
215 horses-some by being captured, others by being worn out and
abandoned.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient
servant,

S. TRAMEL.
Maj. First Alabama Volunteer Cavalry, Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. J. N. LUKINS,
A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 3d Cav. Div., Mil. Div. of the Miss.


Source: Official Records
PAGE 896-98 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. [CHAP. LIX.
[Series I. Vol. 47. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 98.]

P2148459.gif


Francis Lytle Cramer

Residence Clarinda IA; 26 years old.

Enlisted on 7/17/1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant.

On 7/17/1861 he was commissioned into "I" Co. NE 1st Infantry
He was discharged for promotion on 10/24/1863

On 10/24/1863 he was commissioned into Field & Staff AL 1st Cavalry
He was Mustered Out on 10/20/1865 at Huntsville, AL


He was listed as:
* POW (date and place not stated)
* Wounded (date and place not stated)


Promotions:
* 1st Lieut 1/30/1862
* Adjutant 4/24/1862
* Major 10/24/1863 (As of 1st AL Cav)
* Brig-General 3/13/1865 by Brevet


Other Information:
born in Lancaster County, PA
died 2/20/1890 in Oklahoma City, OK
Buried: Fairlawn Cemty, Oklahoma City, OK

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Report of Adjutant-General Report of the State of Nebraska
- Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue
- Dyer: A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion
- Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force 1861-1865
- Index to Compiled Military Service Records
- Alabama Tories: The 1st Alabama Cavalry, U.S.A.
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
................................................................................................................

The Union 1st Alabama Cavalry fought at Chickamauga Sept.20, 1863.

VINCENT'S CROSS-ROADS, MISSISSIPPI
OCTOBER 26, 1863.

Vincent's Cross-Roads, Miss., Oct. 26, 1863. 1st Alabama
Cavalry. A Confederate detachment under Brig.-Gen. S. W. Fer-
guson came upon about 500 men of the 1st Ala. cavalry drawn up
in line of battle at Vincent's cross-roads near Bay Springs.
After a fight of some hours the Confederates were victorious,
suffering a loss of 2 killed and 11 wounded. Union reports
make no mention of casualties, but Ferguson says 20 were
killed, 9 wounded and 29 captured.


Source: The Union Army, vol. 6
............................................................................................................

Camp Davies, Miss.,
Nov. 22, 1863.

1st Alabama Cavalry.

A force of 150 Confederates, commanded by Maj. T. W. Ham was
attacked on the Ripley road, 5 miles from Camp Davies by Maj.
Cramer with 70 men of the 1st Ala. cavalry, and after a sharp
skirmish was driven toward Rienzi, with a loss of 4 killed and
several wounded.

Cramer's casualties were 2 men severely wounded.

Source: The Union Army, Vol.,5 p.,214

********************************************************************************

NOVEMBER 22, 1863.--Skirmish at Camp Davies, Miss.

Report of Brig. Gen. John D. Stevenson, U. S. Army.

CORINTH, MISS.,
November 22, 1863.
A force of enemy, 150 strong, under Ham, appearing on Ripley road,
5 miles from Camp Davies, were attacked by Maj. Cramer, First
Alabama Cavalry, with 70 men, and after a sharp fight were driven in
confusion in direction of Rienzi. Enemy's loss, 4 known to be killed.
Our loss, 2 severely wounded.

JOHN D. STEVENSON,
Brig.-Gen.

Maj.-Gen. HURLBUT.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLIII.] SKIRMISHES AT AND NEAR SPARTA, TENN. PAGE 573-54
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part I, Reports and Union Correspondence. Serial No. 54.]
..............................................................................................................................
 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
The 1st Al USV was also gen. Sherman's color guard during the march through Ga. My on another fourm a poster had a diary written by his GGGf who served in the 1st Al and deserted from the CSA. On the web there is an article that states that quite a few of the 1st Al had previously served in the CSA.
Leftyhunter
 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
First Alabama Cavalry
Organized: Huntsville & Memphis, TN on 10/1/62
Mustered Out: 10/20/65 at Huntsville Ala

Report of Maj. Sanford Tramel, First Alabama
Cavalry of operations January 28-March 24.

HDQRS. FIRST ALABAMA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY,
Faison's Depot, N. C., March 28, 1865.
LIEUT.: I have the honor to report that in obedience to orders
received from your headquarters, my regiment under command of Maj.
F. L. Cramer, numbering 28 officers and 292 men for duty, broke camp
near Savannah Ga., on the 28th day of January, 1865, and moved with
the brigade on the Springfield road leading to Sister's Ferry on the
Savannah River. We arrived at Sister's Ferry on the evening of the
29th, and camped two miles from the river, where we remained until
the 3d day of February, when we crossed the river and commenced our
march in south Carolina in the direction of Lawtonville.

On the 4th Capt. J. J. Hinds, commanding Second Battalion, was
ordered back to Sister's Ferry to report to Maj.-Gen. Slocum, in
obedience to orders from the colonel commanding brigade. This left
only one battalion of 170 men in the regiment. On the 6th we had some
skirmishing with Crews' brigade, of Wheeler's command, capturing
some prisoners. On the 7th assisted in destroying Charleston and
Augusta Railroad. On the 8th we moved from Blackville on the road
to Williston, my regiment in advance. I, with two squadrons, was
ordered in the advance, and came to the rebel pickets just before
reaching the village. We routed and drove them through the town, and
established a picket-post half a mile west of the village, awaiting the
arrival of the command. The regiment soon arrived, and as we were
about to establish camp the picket-post was attacked. Capt. Latty, in
command of two squadrons, was immediately ordered forward with
instructions to ascertain, if possible the force the enemy had in the
vicinity. As he advanced the firing became rapid, and I, with the
remaining three squadrons, was ordered to Capt. Latty's assistance.
We drove them one mile and a half, where we found they had
established a strong line. Maj. Cramer was soon on the ground and
took command of the main body in the center, while I, with twenty
men, and Capt. Latty with the same number, moved on each flank of
the enemy, Maj. Cramer advancing with the center. This movement
routed them. We drove them half a mile, where they had another line.
This we broke also, and halted for a short time, when Col. Spencer,
Cmdg. brigade, re-enforced us with the Fifth Kentucky Cavalry.
We were then ordered to resume the chase, and on advancing found the
enemy in a strong position in the woods near White Pond. On being
ordered we charged them, when followed the most complete rout I ever
witnessed. Guns, sabers, canteens, haversacks, saddle-bags, hats, and
everything which would impede the flight of the affrighted and flying
enemy were abandoned and completely strewn over the ground. We
continued the pursuit over five miles, capturing quite a number of
prisoners, with five stand of colors. We were then ordered to abandon
the pursuit, and returned to camp at Williston. We ascertained we had
been contending against a greatly superior force of the enemy.

The conduct of the officers and men of my regiment on this occasion
was praiseworthy in the highest degree. The loss of the regiment was
four men wounded, one mortally, who afterward died.

On the 10th of February Capt. Hinds joined us with his battalion,
and the regiment was present at the fight near Aiken, but took no active
part, except to build a barricade and hold a position on the right. On the
11th we again resumed our march with the brigade, and participated in
all the different scenes through which it passed, crossing the Edisto,
Saluda, Broad, Wateree, and Great Pedee Rivers, via Lexington, Alston,
Black Stocks, Lancaster, and Sneedsborough nothing of special
importance occurring. After crossing the Great Pedee River and going
into camp at 9 o'clock on the evening of March 6, I was ordered to take
fifty men and proceed to Rockingham, N. C., about twelve miles distant,
and, if possible, take the place and secure the mail. I advanced to
within three miles of the place without meeting any opposition. I there
found the road strongly picketed by the enemy, and immediately ordered
my men to charge, which they did in a gallant manner, driving the
enemy from post to post until we reached the edge of the village, where
we found a line too strong for us to break with the small force at my
command; consequently I ordered the men to fall back slowly, which
they did in good order. I then returned to camp, arriving there at 4 a.m.
on the 7th. We again moved with the brigade on the 7th, via
Rockingham, and Solemn Grove, and on the evening of the 9th camped
at Monroe's Cross-Roads, having marched during the day in close
proximity with the enemy. At the sounding of reveille on the morning
of the 10th instant, we were aroused from sleep by the whistling of
bullets and the friendship yelling of the enemy, who were charging into
our camp. Then followed a most bloody hand-to-hand conflict, our men
forming behind trees and stumps and the enemy endeavoring to charge
us (mounted) with the saber.

While gallantly cheering his men Maj. F. L. Cramer was wounded
and taken prisoner.

The fighting was most desperate for an hour, when we succeeded in
connection with the Fifth Kentucky and Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry,
in driving the enemy away from our camps.

During the fight I was captured by the enemy and held as prisoner until
the 14th instant, when I succeeded in making my escape, and after three
days lying in the swamps and traveling nights, I succeeded in rejoining
my command.

After my capture Capt. J. J. Hinds took command of the regiment
and retained it until my return, and I am indebted to him for the gallant
manner in which he handled the command during the remainder of that
severe and terrible fight.

Capt. Peek deserves special mention for his gallant daring and
coolness during this struggle. The loss of the regiment in the affair was
4 men killed, 27 wounded, and 41 missing.

My regiment moved with the brigade, and was present when the cavalry
encountered the enemy on the evening of the 15th, also in the fight of
the 16th instant, but sustained no loss as it held a position on the left.
We next encountered the enemy in strong force on the 18th, but evaded
him by taking a road leading more to the right, while a portion of the
Fifth Kentucky Cavalry attracted his attention at a certain point. We
encountered the enemy again same day, but he was easily repulsed and
driven away. My regiment continued with the brigade; was present and
assisted in guarding the left flank of the army during the hard battles
of the 19th, 20th, and 21st instant. The enemy then being routed and
the campaign ended, my regiment moved with the brigade to Faison's
Depot, where we arrived on the 24th instant and have remained in camp
since that time.

During the campaign my regiment has captured something over 100
prisoners and over 200 horses.

The regiment has lost during the campaign; Maj. F. L. Cramer,
severely wounded and a prisoner; afterward paroled on account of
wounds. Capt. John Latty, Company C; First Lieut. George W.
Emerick, Company A; First Lieut. Joseph H. Hornback, Company
K, Second Lieut. George C. Jenkins, Company M, wounded
severely; Surge. J. G. C. Swaving and First Lieut. John P. Moore,
Company E, captured. Moore afterward escaped. Four enlisted men
killed, 28 wounded (2 or 3 mortally, who afterward died), 46 captured;
215 horses-some by being captured, others by being worn out and
abandoned.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient
servant,

S. TRAMEL.
Maj. First Alabama Volunteer Cavalry, Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. J. N. LUKINS,
A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 3d Cav. Div., Mil. Div. of the Miss.

Source: Official Records
PAGE 896-98 OPERATIONS IN N. C., S. C., S. GA., AND E. FLA. [CHAP. LIX.
[Series I. Vol. 47. Part I, Reports. Serial No. 98.]

P2148459.gif


Francis Lytle Cramer

Residence Clarinda IA; 26 years old.

Enlisted on 7/17/1861 as a 2nd Lieutenant.

On 7/17/1861 he was commissioned into "I" Co. NE 1st Infantry
He was discharged for promotion on 10/24/1863

On 10/24/1863 he was commissioned into Field & Staff AL 1st Cavalry
He was Mustered Out on 10/20/1865 at Huntsville, AL

He was listed as:
* POW (date and place not stated)
* Wounded (date and place not stated)

Promotions:
* 1st Lieut 1/30/1862
* Adjutant 4/24/1862
* Major 10/24/1863 (As of 1st AL Cav)
* Brig-General 3/13/1865 by Brevet

Other Information:
born in Lancaster County, PA
died 2/20/1890 in Oklahoma City, OK
Buried: Fairlawn Cemty, Oklahoma City, OK

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Report of Adjutant-General Report of the State of Nebraska
- Brevet Brigadier Generals in Blue
- Dyer: A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion
- Official Army Register of the Volunteer Force 1861-1865
- Index to Compiled Military Service Records
- Alabama Tories: The 1st Alabama Cavalry, U.S.A.
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
................................................................................................................

The Union 1st Alabama Cavalry fought at Chickamauga Sept.20, 1863.

VINCENT'S CROSS-ROADS, MISSISSIPPI
OCTOBER 26, 1863.

Vincent's Cross-Roads, Miss., Oct. 26, 1863. 1st Alabama
Cavalry. A Confederate detachment under Brig.-Gen. S. W. Fer-
guson came upon about 500 men of the 1st Ala. cavalry drawn up
in line of battle at Vincent's cross-roads near Bay Springs.
After a fight of some hours the Confederates were victorious,
suffering a loss of 2 killed and 11 wounded. Union reports
make no mention of casualties, but Ferguson says 20 were
killed, 9 wounded and 29 captured.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 6
............................................................................................................

Camp Davies, Miss.,
Nov. 22, 1863.

1st Alabama Cavalry.

A force of 150 Confederates, commanded by Maj. T. W. Ham was
attacked on the Ripley road, 5 miles from Camp Davies by Maj.
Cramer with 70 men of the 1st Ala. cavalry, and after a sharp
skirmish was driven toward Rienzi, with a loss of 4 killed and
several wounded.

Cramer's casualties were 2 men severely wounded.

Source: The Union Army, Vol.,5 p.,214

********************************************************************************

NOVEMBER 22, 1863.--Skirmish at Camp Davies, Miss.

Report of Brig. Gen. John D. Stevenson, U. S. Army.

CORINTH, MISS.,
November 22, 1863.
A force of enemy, 150 strong, under Ham, appearing on Ripley road,
5 miles from Camp Davies, were attacked by Maj. Cramer, First
Alabama Cavalry, with 70 men, and after a sharp fight were driven in
confusion in direction of Rienzi. Enemy's loss, 4 known to be killed.
Our loss, 2 severely wounded.

JOHN D. STEVENSON,
Brig.-Gen.

Maj.-Gen. HURLBUT.

Source: Official Records
CHAP. XLIII.] SKIRMISHES AT AND NEAR SPARTA, TENN. PAGE 573-54
[Series I. Vol. 31. Part I, Reports and Union Correspondence. Serial No. 54.]
..............................................................................................................................
There is a 1st Al USV reanactor group with a good website. 1stalabamacavalryusv.com.
Leftyhunter
 
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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
The 1st Al USV was also gen. Sherman's color guard during the march through Ga. My on another fourm a poster had a diary written by his GGGf who served in the 1st Al and deserted from the CSA. On the web there is an article that states that quite a few of the 1st Al had previously served in the CSA.
Leftyhunter
That was often the case in Arkansas and Tennessee units.
 

NedBaldwin

Major
Joined
Feb 19, 2011
Location
California
In February 1864, Gen. Morgan Smith conducted an expedition into northern Alabama. His report included the following somewhat humorous anecdote:

"It also enabled men to come out of the fastnesses of Sand Mountain who had been secreted a great part of the time for two years, several of whom have since raised companies for the First Alabama Cavalry, and some have enlisted in infantry regiments. One man, McCurdy, immediately after our second advance, mustered his company with a pencil on brown paper, christened it, assumed command, ordered an advance into Sand Mountain, and actually made captures of rebel home guards in the same hiding places they had themselves just vacated. These loyal Alabamians are invaluable, and exceed in number and are equal in zeal to anything we discovered in East Tennessee."
 
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Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
There was also a unit called the 1st Alabama & Tennessee Vedette Cavalry, organized in 1863 and 1864, which was apparently a different unit than the 1st Alabama Cavalry though I find it confusing to distinguish the two
TENNESSEE
1st TENNESSEE AND ALABAMA VIDETTE CAVALRY.

Organized Companies "A," "B," "C," "G" and "H" at Stevenson and Bridgeport, Ala.,
September 10, 1863, to April 26, 1864. Companies "D," "E" and "F" at Tracy City and
Nashville, Tenn., December 9, 1863, to February 24, 1864. Participated in skirmish
at Hunt's Mills near Larkinsville, Ala., September 28, 1863. Beersheeba Springs
November 26. Expedition to Lebanon December 12-29. Skirmish at Sand Mountain, Ala.,
December 26. Mustered out June 16, 1864. Used primarily as scouts. Also included men from Georgia.

http://www.tngenweb.org/civilwar/usacav/usa1vcav.html


Frederick A. Dyer "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" vol. 3
 
Last edited:
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
In February 1864, Gen. Morgan Smith conducted an expedition into northern Alabama. His report included the following somewhat humorous anecdote:

"It also enabled men to come out of the fastnesses of Sand Mountain who had been secreted a great part of the time for two years, several of whom have since raised companies for the First Alabama Cavalry, and some have enlisted in infantry regiments. One man, McCurdy, immediately after our second advance, mustered his company with a pencil on brown paper, christened it, assumed command, ordered an advance into Sand Mountain, and actually made captures of rebel home guards in the same hiding places they had themselves just vacated. These loyal Alabamians are invaluable, and exceed in number and are equal in zeal to anything we discovered in East Tennessee."
P785.gif


Smith, Morgan L., brigadier-general, was born in the
state of New York, and in early manhood, on July 19, 1845, he
joined the United States regular army, in which he served five
years. For some reason or other he enlisted under the name of
Martin L. Sanford, and as such his name appears upon the
rolls, as private, corporal and sergeant. After retiring from
the regular army service he located in Missouri where he was
living at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. On July
4, 1861, he was commissioned colonel of the 8th Mo. infantry,
which, before its organization was complete, was called upon
to suppress the guerrillas engaged in committing depredations
along the line of the North Missouri railroad, defeating them
in the vicinity of St. Charles and Mexico. On July 29 he left
St. Louis with his regiment and on Sept. 7 landed at Paducah,
Ky., where he remained until the following February and then
joined the forces moving against Forts Henry and Donelson.
Fort Henry had surrendered before the regiment arrived, but at
Donelson the regiment and its colonel behaved in a gallant
manner, assisting in the repulse of the enemy when he
attempted to cut his way out. Col. Smith was in some of the
heaviest fighting at Shiloh on the second day of that battle,
then participated in the advance upon Corinth, and while in
that vicinity, on July 16, 1862, he was commissioned
brigadier-general of volunteers. He continued to serve in
that capacity until the close of the war, rendering faithful
and meritorious service, and on July 12, 1865, he resigned his
commission and took up the threads of civil life. He died on
Dec. 29, 1874.

Source: The Union Army, vol. 8
 
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leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
In February 1864, Gen. Morgan Smith conducted an expedition into northern Alabama. His report included the following somewhat humorous anecdote:

"It also enabled men to come out of the fastnesses of Sand Mountain who had been secreted a great part of the time for two years, several of whom have since raised companies for the First Alabama Cavalry, and some have enlisted in infantry regiments. One man, McCurdy, immediately after our second advance, mustered his company with a pencil on brown paper, christened it, assumed command, ordered an advance into Sand Mountain, and actually made captures of rebel home guards in the same hiding places they had themselves just vacated. These loyal Alabamians are invaluable, and exceed in number and are equal in zeal to anything we discovered in East Tennessee."
Hi Ned,
I have gotten the two units mixed up my self. From a previous thread I learned from another poster the Viddete unit was more of a home guard unit and I remember on the web(and I dont have time to research it right now) the Videttes were not considered that good and has noted they where mustered out a year or so prior to the end of the CW. Interesting that Gen.Smith made mention of his opinion that the Al Unionists where of better quality or more enthusiastic then those of East Tn. Maybe we can make a thread of what Unionist regiments where best. Per the 1stalabamausv.com website in common with all Union regiments that I know of not all members of the 1st Al where from Al nor where all US citizens but apparently the majority where from Al.
Leftyhunter
 
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Location
Kingsport, Tennessee
If only we could find similar information about the Alabaman named McCurdy who Smith wrote about.
Seems there were a clan of them. This is probably the one Gen.Smith spoke of. No details, but he apparently didn't survive the war. Also, Elijah C, Nathaniel W, Samuel R, and Seborn W. Couple of them buried in the same cemetery with Mechlen. " These loyal Alabamians are invaluable, and exceed in number and are equal in zeal to anything we discovered in East Tennessee." I believe the General meant," as of Feb.1864." This was probably true. I certainly don't believe he was referring to all Union troops from east Tennessee that had first put their lives on the line to get through Confederate lines to the Federal Army in Kentucky. Any list of " best " southern Union regiments would have to start with the 1st Tenn Cavalry.

Mechlen A. McCurdy

Residence was not listed;
Enlisted as a Comm Sergt (date unknown).
He also had service in:
"B" Co. TN Vidette Cavalry
Other Information:

Buried: Warren Cemty, Town Creek, AL

(Or Michlen McCurdy)

Sources used by Historical Data Systems, Inc.:

- Index to Compiled Military Service Records
- Research provided by HDS subscriber
(c) Historical Data Systems, Inc. @ www.civilwardata.com
 

leftyhunter

Brev. Brig. Gen'l
Joined
May 27, 2011
Location
los angeles ca
If only we could find similar information about the Alabaman named McCurdy who Smith wrote about.
Hi Ned,
You might when you get time check out oocitirs.org/chedear001/videttecavalry. The Viddetes get trash talked by a Union general and the fact they where only in service for six months suggests they where the Gomer Pyle battalion of the Union Army. None the less the other soldiers from Al did well from what I gather.
Leftyhunter
 
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