History Southern Sweet Potato Bread

Joined
Jan 6, 2013
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Location
Buford, Georgia
#1
tlanta Constitution, Jun. 21, 1892 -- page 11

Southern Sweet Potato Bread

Bake three large sweet potatoes, peel and mash them through a colander with a potato masher, adding them to a teaspoonful of slt. after they have been mashed, mix them with a cup ful and a half of cornmeal, a scant cupful of milk and one egg (beaten smooth); pour this batter into a buttered baking dish and bake in amoderate oven ofr twenty minutes. use the bread hot with plenty of butter. - Good Houskeeping
 

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Joined
Apr 24, 2017
Messages
349
#4
Another recipe of the times. Sweet Potatoes are referred to in many accounts in the Army of the West in the summer of 62 and after.

Harry Wilt Pflager Chief QM A.W.

"Office Chf. Q. ,.. A.W.
Camp near Granada, Jan. 1863.

I propose this time to weary you with a long letter.
I will write a few lines from day to day until I have an oppor-
tunity to send it. I have written to you several times within
the last month and in one of my letters I wrote you how to send
an answer. So I expect to hear from you very soon, in eight or
ten days.

We are having lovely weather here in Dixie this winter:
Vie have not had any snow here yet except a slight one in Oct. last.
The nights are generally pretty cold but hardly ever cold enough
to freeze the ground or make ice. I have had but little use for
an overcoat so far. The days are generally mild and pleasant.
I can hardly realize that it is winter. .•'i e have had a good deal
of rain since the first of the month and the roads are getting
very bad, but as long as we do not have to move, it makes no
difference. If this were a specimen of the Southern winters I
should want to live here afterthe war is over, but the citizens
tell me it is much milder than usual.

There is nothing we miss as much as apples. I have
not tasted an apple for three months. There are none in this
country. The Army is living on corn bread and beef and
occasionally a little pork. We can buy plenty of Sweet Potatoes
but they are seldom ever issued to the men. I do not know how
I would get along if it were not for the Sweet Potatoes. vie use
them as a substitute for Coffee (and a very good one it is when
Coffee is selling for X3.00 a pound) ; and also make bread of them
by mixing them with corn meal, and I can assure you it is a great
improvement on corn bread. If you want to eat something nice,
take a few Potatoes, boil them soft, mash them up with an equal
quantity of corn meal and a spoonful of lard and bake same as
other corn bread, and you will have the kind of bread we live on
in Camp. Flour is very scarce and sells from 750 to $1.00 a
barrel. So you may know that we touch it lightly. We have the
best cook in the Army, he is a black boy "Daniel'. He fixes up
things very nice. I wish you could drop in sometime and see our
table. I know you would be surprised to see how nice we live,
and how he does up our white shirts and collars, nicer than I
ever had them done at home.

I believe I wrote you about having Brother Marvin
with us. He is Chaplain for Hd Qs and Messes with us. He makes a
very agreeable mess-mate I can assure you. He is the best preacher
in the Army. I wish you could hear him preach to the Missourians
sometime. He takes great interest in the Missourians and is a
great favorite with them. I hardly know which I like best, he or
Bro. Caples. I suppose you still have Bro. Caples to preach for
you at B. Occasionally I wish he were here to preach to the Army.
We have much need for such men as him and Marvin."
 
Joined
Apr 3, 2018
Messages
195
#5
Made this recipe and hubby and I quite liked it. Pretty heavy for a modern bread but comparable to other recipes of the time. I sometimes think they used "bread" more in a "staff of life" sense, while we moderns think of it as something fluffy you use as a base for other flavors. Americans are not big on unleavened breads -- and even when they eat them, they don't think of them as bread, but more as crackers or tortillas or matzos or whatever. As something separate from bread, anyhow.
 

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